Trump Jr. to Dem Senator: 'You admitted to hitting your wife so hard it gave her a black eye!'

Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpSwalwell on flatulence allegation: Total exoneration Conway and Haley get into heated feud: 'You'll say anything to get the vice-presidential nomination' Conservative group cuts ties with Michelle Malkin MORE mocked Democratic Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperLobbying World Overnight Energy: BLM staff face choice of relocation or resignation as agency moves | Trump says he's 'very much into climate' | EPA rule would expand limits on scientific studies Democrats give Warren's 'Medicare for All' plan the cold shoulder MORE (D-Del.) on Friday over a decades-old admission of domestic violence after the senator criticized a member of the White House staff.

In a tweet, the president's son brought up Carper's 1998 admission that he once slapped his wife, leaving her with "some discoloration of her left eye," according to a deposition reported by the conservative The Washington Free Beacon. The incident was reported in a 1982 New York Post article that claimed his wife's two children from a previous relationship "were slapped around and bruised by Carper for doing such things as leaving the family dog on the bed."

Carper said late last year that he never lied about the incident in his 1982 bid for the House, but he did admit to slapping his wife.

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"You admitted to hitting your wife so hard it gave her a black eye!" Trump Jr. wrote.

"Maybe you shouldn’t be so worried about someone mistakenly putting #maga in a tweet??? Seems you have other serious issues to work out," he added of the nearly four-decades-old incident, for which Carper has apologized.

Carper has repeatedly apologized for the incident, including in December after a Free Beacon report accused him of lying about the incident during his 1982 bid for the House.

"I have made many mistakes in my life and have always been willing to admit them. One of those mistakes took place 37 years ago when I slapped my then-wife, Diane, during a heated argument," Carper said last year.

"It was wrong. I regretted it then, and I still do today," he added.

Trump Jr.'s tweet came in response to Carper's criticism on Thursday of first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpBilly Ray Cyrus thanks Melania Trump after meeting with family of cyberbullying victim Trump rips speculation about his health after Walter Reed visit Trump reversed course on flavored e-cigarette ban over fear of job losses: report MORE's spokeswoman, Stephanie Grisham. In a letter sent to Carper, the Office of the Special Counsel (OSC) warned Grisham for a tweet found to be in violation the Hatch Act.

The Hatch Act prohibits government employees from using their official capacities to endorse or campaign for a candidate seeking office. Several members of the administration, including White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayConway and Haley get into heated feud: 'You'll say anything to get the vice-presidential nomination' NBC signs Mueller 'pit bull' prosecutor Andrew Weissman as legal analyst George Conway and Trump Jr. trade personal insults during impeachment hearing MORE and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyTillerson: Using American aid for 'some kind of personal gain [is] wrong' Conway and Haley get into heated feud: 'You'll say anything to get the vice-presidential nomination' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Former Ukraine envoy offers dramatic testimony MORE, have been cited for past violations.

"Two months after my inquiry, the @US_OSC has confirmed that yet another Trump White House staffer has violated the Hatch Act. This administration's blatant and repeated disregard for the law is astounding and unacceptable," Carper tweeted Thursday. Carper's office had raised the allegations with the special counsel.

"At the very least, we should be able to trust that those who serve in the highest positions in our government will follow the law. Instead, this administration seems to promote a culture where showing that basic level of respect for the American taxpayer is optional," he added.