Amnesty International calls to halt Kavanaugh nomination

Amnesty International calls to halt Kavanaugh nomination
© Greg Nash

Amnesty International is calling on senators to to halt the nomination of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh over his "possible involvement" in human rights violations after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. 

The human rights organization wrote in a Monday letter that Kavanaugh might have been involved "in issues related to torture and rendition after 9/11."

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"More information must be made public to determine Kavanaugh’s role in relation to such practices," the organization wrote. "Amnesty International has long called for declassification of any documents or other materials depicting or describing enforced disappearance, torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or other human rights violations, including acts of abduction and rendition, by US or non-US personnel after the attacks in the USA on September 11, 2001." 

Kavanaugh was working in the George W. Bush administration at the time of the attacks. 

Amnesty International is calling for a freeze on Kavanaugh's confirmation process until those documents are released publicly, calling the vetting of Kavanaugh’s human rights record "insufficient." 

The organization said the vote on Kavanaugh should be "further postponed unless and until any information relevant to Kavanaugh’s possible involvement in human rights violations—including in relation to the U.S. government’s use of torture and other forms of ill-treatment, such as during the CIA detention program—is declassified and made public."

Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDemocrats detail new strategy to pressure McConnell on election security bills Democrats detail new strategy to pressure McConnell on election security bills Hillicon Valley: GOP senator wants one agency to run tech probes | Huawei expects to lose B in sales from US ban | Self-driving car bill faces tough road ahead | Elon Musk tweets that he 'deleted' his Twitter account MORE (D-Calif.), Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyTrump planning Air Force One flyover during July 4 celebration at Mall: report Senators reach .5B deal on Trump's emergency border request Senators reach .5B deal on Trump's emergency border request MORE (D-Vt.) and Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinOvernight Defense: Shanahan exit shocks Washington | Pentagon left rudderless | Lawmakers want answers on Mideast troop deployment | Senate could vote on Saudi arms deal this week | Pompeo says Trump doesn't want war with Iran Senators demand Trump explain decision to deploy troops amid Iran tensions Senators demand Trump explain decision to deploy troops amid Iran tensions MORE (D-Ill.) in an August letter made a similar request, calling for the declassification of documents from Kavanaugh's time in the White House after 9/11. The senators claimed he was more involved in those controversial policies than he originally let on. 

Two publicly available documents cast doubt on Kavanaugh's assertion that he was not involved in the United States' post-9/11 counterterrorism policy, the senators wrote.

The senators wrote that "in 2006, Judge Kavanaugh told the [Senate Judiciary] Committee under oath that he was 'not aware of any issues'" regarding post-9/11 policies, including the treatment of detainees and the Bush administration's warrantless wiretapping program.  

"At least two documents that are publicly available on the Bush Library website from Judge Kavanaugh’s time as Staff Secretary suggest that he was involved in issues related to torture and rendition after 9/11," the senators wrote, citing two documents that seem to indicate Kavanaugh was looped into conversations about polices regarding torture. 

Amnesty International does not typically weigh in on the appointment of individuals to government positions unless they "are reasonably suspected of crimes under international law," according to the Monday letter.