Graham suggests lack of details in Ford’s testimony

Graham suggests lack of details in Ford’s testimony
© Greg Nash

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSupreme Court fight should drive Democrats and help Biden Graham to meet with Trump's Supreme Court pick on Tuesday Democratic super PAC launches .5M ad campaign against Graham MORE (R) on Thursday cast doubt on Christine Blasey Ford's sexual assault allegation against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, suggesting her testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee lacks details of the alleged incident.

"I don't know any more than I knew before," Graham, a member of the Judiciary panel, told reporters on Capitol Hill before the hearing was over. "I know that the people who've claimed to have been at the party say nothing happened. I don't know how she got home or how she got there."

ADVERTISEMENT

"I think something happened to Dr. Ford. I'm gonna listen to Brett Kavanaugh," he added, before expressing that he was "disappointed" with how Democrats handled Ford's allegations.

"They knew about this in July," Graham told reporters, adding that there was a polygraph test on Aug. 10 that the committee received on Sept. 26. "We offered to go out there," he said, referring to California, where Ford lives.

Ford said she initially notified her local congresswoman, Rep. Anna EshooAnna Georges EshooHillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close Lawmakers introduce legislation to boost cybersecurity of local governments, small businesses Democratic chairman says White House blocked FDA commissioner from testifying MORE (D-Calif.), in late July about her allegation. She said Eshoo urged her to write a letter to Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by JobsOhio - Trump's tax return bombshell Hawley warns Schumer to steer clear of Catholic-based criticisms of Barrett Senate GOP set to vote on Trump's Supreme Court pick before election MORE (Calif.), the top Democrat on the Judiciary panel, about the allegation. That letter to Feinstein was sent in late July.

Feinstein has said that she honored Ford's request for privacy. The letter's existence was later reported in the press and Ford eventually went public with her accusation in a Washington Post interview.

Graham joined other Republicans in asserting that Ford's remarks about her fear of flying, coupled with her saying that she flew to Washington for Thursday's hearing, are evidence that her accusations against Kavanaugh are overblown.

"She said she couldn't come here because of a fear of flying. None of that is holding water," he told reporters.

Donald Trump Jr.Don John Trump'Tiger King' star Joe Exotic requests pardon from Trump: 'Be my hero please' Zaid Jilani discusses Trump's move to cancel racial sensitivity training at federal agencies Trump International Hotel in Vancouver closes permanently MORE tweeted during the hearing: "I’m no psychology professor but it does seem weird to me that someone could have a selective fear of flying. Can’t do it to testify but for vacation, well it’s not a problem at all."

Kavanaugh is scheduled to testify later on Thursday. The Senate Judiciary Committee has not scheduled a hearing to hear the allegations from two other women who have accused Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct.

The committee is expected to vote Friday morning on whether to advance Kavanaugh's nomination to the full Senate for a confirmation vote.

Updated at 2:03 p.m.