Tester to oppose Kavanaugh

Tester to oppose Kavanaugh
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterSenate votes to overturn IRS guidance limiting donor disclosure Senate confirms Trump's pick to be deputy Treasury secretary O’Rourke is fireball, but not all Dems are sold MORE (D-Mont.) said Friday that he will oppose Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination.

Tester said Friday that he has a myriad of "concerns" about Kavanaugh, but could not get an in-person meeting with him to discuss the issues.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I have concerns that Judge Kavanaugh defended the PATRIOT Act instead of Montanans' privacy. I have concerns about his support for more dark money in politics. I have concerns about who he believes is in charge of making personal health decisions," Tester said.

Tester added that he had "deep concerns about the allegations of sexual assault against Judge Kavanaugh."

Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, the first of Kavanaugh's accusers to come forward publicly, testified before the Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

Tester noted that because he couldn't schedule a meeting with Kavanaugh the "only information I have is from what he said in his hearing."

Republicans don't need Tester's vote to confirm Kavanaugh. They have a 51-seat majority and can lose one senator before they need help from Democrats.

No Republican senator has said she or he will oppose Kavanaugh. Moderate GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report — No deal in sight as shutdown looms Bipartisan senators doubt ruling striking down ObamaCare GOP's Collins: Judge's ruling striking down ObamaCare 'will be overturned' MORE (Maine) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiWhen is a deal not a deal? When there’s a wildlife refuge to be exploited House funding bill scraps Arctic icebreaker program Senate advances Trump energy pick after Manchin flips MORE (Alaska) are the two Republican senators who remain undecided.

Tester is the latest Democrat from a state President TrumpDonald John TrumpReturn hope to the Middle East by returning to the Iran Deal Government shutdowns tend to increase government spending 'Full Frontal' gives six-bedroom house to group that works with detained immigrants MORE won in 2016 to say he will oppose Kavanaugh.

Democratic Sens. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyHatch warns Senate 'in crisis' in farewell speech Dem senators Heitkamp, Donnelly urge bipartisanship in farewell speeches Schumer gets ready to go on the offensive MORE (Ind.), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonMcCaskill: 'Too many embarrassing uncles' in the Senate Bill Nelson uses farewell address to remind colleagues ‘no one person is above the law’ Coal supporter Manchin named top Dem on Senate Energy Committee MORE (Fla.) and Doug Jones (Ala.) also announced their opposition following Thursday's hearing.

Tester and Nelson did not support Trump's first Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, and were viewed as likely 'no' votes on Kavanaugh.

Donnelly was one of three Democrats who supported Gorsuch. Democratic Sens. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Defense: Senate bucks Trump with Yemen war vote, resolution calling crown prince 'responsible' for Khashoggi killing | House briefing on Saudi Arabia fails to move needle | Inhofe casts doubt on Space Force Hillicon Valley — Presented by AT&T — New momentum for privacy legislation | YouTube purges spam videos | Apple plans B Austin campus | Iranian hackers targeted Treasury officials | FEC to let lawmakers use campaign funds for cyber Manchin puts hold on FCC nomination over wireless internet fund delay MORE (W.Va.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampHatch warns Senate 'in crisis' in farewell speech Dem senators Heitkamp, Donnelly urge bipartisanship in farewell speeches House passes bipartisan bill aimed at reversing rising maternal mortality rates MORE (N.D.) remain undecided.

-- Updated 12:41 p.m.