Tester to oppose Kavanaugh

Tester to oppose Kavanaugh
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterSenate votes to reauthorize intel programs with added legal protections Senators request emergency funding for postal service in next coronavirus bill On The Money: Black workers may face disproportionate COVID-19 risk | Trump pick for pandemic response watchdog vows independence | Stocks inch higher as oil prices rise MORE (D-Mont.) said Friday that he will oppose Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination.

Tester said Friday that he has a myriad of "concerns" about Kavanaugh, but could not get an in-person meeting with him to discuss the issues.

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“I have concerns that Judge Kavanaugh defended the PATRIOT Act instead of Montanans' privacy. I have concerns about his support for more dark money in politics. I have concerns about who he believes is in charge of making personal health decisions," Tester said.

Tester added that he had "deep concerns about the allegations of sexual assault against Judge Kavanaugh."

Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, the first of Kavanaugh's accusers to come forward publicly, testified before the Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

Tester noted that because he couldn't schedule a meeting with Kavanaugh the "only information I have is from what he said in his hearing."

Republicans don't need Tester's vote to confirm Kavanaugh. They have a 51-seat majority and can lose one senator before they need help from Democrats.

No Republican senator has said she or he will oppose Kavanaugh. Moderate GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Surgeon General stresses need to invest much more in public health infrastructure, during and after COVID-19; Fauci hopeful vaccine could be deployed in December Republicans push for help for renewable energy, fossil fuel industries Senators weigh traveling amid coronavirus ahead of Memorial Day MORE (Maine) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRepublicans push for help for renewable energy, fossil fuel industries The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Mnuchin: More COVID-19 congressional action ahead Senators weigh traveling amid coronavirus ahead of Memorial Day MORE (Alaska) are the two Republican senators who remain undecided.

Tester is the latest Democrat from a state President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden slams Trump in new ad: 'The death toll is still rising.' 'The president is playing golf' Brazil surpasses Russia with second-highest coronavirus case count in the world Trump slams Sessions: 'You had no courage & ruined many lives' MORE won in 2016 to say he will oppose Kavanaugh.

Democratic Sens. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyEx-Sen. Joe Donnelly endorses Biden Lobbying world 70 former senators propose bipartisan caucus for incumbents MORE (Ind.), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonLobbying world The most expensive congressional races of the last decade Lobbying world MORE (Fla.) and Doug Jones (Ala.) also announced their opposition following Thursday's hearing.

Tester and Nelson did not support Trump's first Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, and were viewed as likely 'no' votes on Kavanaugh.

Donnelly was one of three Democrats who supported Gorsuch. Democratic Sens. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Surgeon General stresses need to invest much more in public health infrastructure, during and after COVID-19; Fauci hopeful vaccine could be deployed in December Congress headed toward unemployment showdown The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Mnuchin sees 'strong likelihood' of another relief package; Warner says some businesses 'may not come back' at The Hill's Advancing America's Economy summit MORE (W.Va.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn Heitkamp70 former senators propose bipartisan caucus for incumbents Susan Collins set to play pivotal role in impeachment drama Pro-trade group launches media buy as Trump and Democrats near deal on new NAFTA MORE (N.D.) remain undecided.

-- Updated 12:41 p.m.