Kavanaugh friend says he'll cooperate with 'confidential' law enforcement investigation

Mark Judge, a high school friend of Brett Kavanaugh's whom Christine Blasey Ford says was in the room during her 1980s sexual assault at the Supreme Court nominee's hands, says he will cooperate with a "confidential" FBI investigation into the allegation.

Judge's statement follows the Senate Judiciary Committee's vote along party lines Friday afternoon sending Kavanaugh's nomination to the full Senate for a vote, accompanied by a statement from Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump says he's 'very happy' some GOP senators have 'gone on to greener pastures' Trump endorses McSally in Arizona Senate race Jeff Flake becoming Harvard fellow MORE (R-Ariz.) claiming that he will vote against Kavanaugh's nomination unless the FBI is allowed to look into the claims further.

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Judge wrote to the top Judiciary panel senators on Friday, explaining that he denies allegations brought forward by Kavanaugh's latest accuser, Julie Swetnick, and that he will cooperate with any investigation that takes place ahead of Kavanaugh's vote on the Senate floor.

"I will cooperate with any law enforcement agency that is assigned to confidentially investigate these allegations," Judge wrote in the letter provided by his lawyer, Barbara Van Gelder.

"The allegations in the Swetnick affidavit are so bizarre that, even while suffering from my addiction, I would remember actions so outlandish. I categorically deny them," Judge added in the brief statement. 

"I do not know Julie Swetnick," he went on, saying: "I do not recall attending parties during 1981-1983 when I fondled or grabbed women in an aggressive or unwanted manner."

Flake has called for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPelosi: Congress will receive election security briefing in July Adam Scott calls on McConnell to take down 'Parks & Rec' gif Trump says he spoke to Pelosi, McConnell on border package MORE (R-Ky.) to delay Kavanaugh's vote by a week to facilitate further investigation.

"I think it would be proper to delay the floor vote for up to but not more than one week in order to let the FBI do an investigation, limited in time and scope to the current allegations that are there," he said Friday.

Flake's statement was later backed up by Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump says he's 'very happy' some GOP senators have 'gone on to greener pastures' Pressure builds to secure health care data Trump plan to strip public land conservation fund gets bipartisan pushback MORE (R-Alaska) and Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinManchin on 'Medicare for All': 'We can't even pay for Medicare for some' Overnight Energy: New EPA rule could expand officials weighing in on FOIA requests | Trump plan to strip conservation fund gets bipartisan pushback | Agriculture chief downplays climate concerns Trump plan to strip public land conservation fund gets bipartisan pushback MORE (D-W.Va.), suggesting that Republicans may lack the votes needed to confirm President TrumpDonald John Trump2020 Democrats spar over socialism ahead of first debate Senate passes .5 billion border bill, setting up fight with House 'Teflon Don' avoids the scorn of the 'family values' GOP — again MORE's nominee without agreeing to the lawmakers' terms.