GOP leaders delay Kavanaugh confirmation for one-week FBI investigation

Senate Republicans on Friday agreed to ask the FBI to investigate sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, a move that will temporarily delay his nomination.
 
The move came as multiple senators, including GOP Sens. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeCheney clashes with Trump Sessions-Tuberville Senate runoff heats up in Alabama GOP lawmakers stick to Trump amid new criticism MORE (Ariz.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenators will have access to intelligence on Russian bounties on US troops Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police Senators push to limit transfer of military-grade equipment to police MORE (Alaska), called for the FBI to be given a chance to investigate, raising questions about if Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPublic awareness campaigns will protect the public during COVID-19 Democrats: A moment in history, use it wisely 'Comrade' Trump gets 'endorsement' from Putin in new mock ad by Lincoln Project MORE (R-Ky.) would be able to move the nomination without a deal.
 

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Asked how long the FBI would have to investigate, Cornyn said not more than a week.
 
The Judiciary Committee said in a statement that it will ask the administration to instruct the FBI to conduct the investigation. 
 
"The supplemental FBI background investigation would be limited to current credible allegations against the nominee and must be completed no later than one week from today," the committee said in a statement.
 
 
"As the Senate has requested, this update must be limited in scope and completed in less than one week," he added.
 
Senators are still expected to hold a procedural vote on Kavanaugh's nomination on Saturday. But a vote to end debate on Kavanaugh on Monday and hold a final vote on his nomination Tuesday are expected to be pushed back to allow the FBI investigation to wrap up.
 
Flake said that he expected that as part of the agreement Democrats would let Republicans do the Saturday vote as a voice vote instead of forcing the Senate to hold a rare weekend session. Cornyn also noted he thought that Saturday could be a voice vote.  

The decision is a u-turn for Republicans and the White House, who have repeatedly dismissed the need for having the FBI reopen Kavanaugh’s background check investigation. The bureau, they argued, had already done six background checks and would not reach a conclusion about the allegations.

Trump's order for a new FBI investigation came hours after the Judiciary Committee sent Kavanaugh’s nomination to the full Senate after Flake's agreement.

"I'm a conservative. I would love to see Judge Kavanaugh confirmed and I would hope to be able to do that, but I want a better process,” Flake told reporters after a meeting in McConnell’s office. 

Flake alone can’t hold up Kavanaugh’s nomination. But he was quickly backed by multiple undecided senators, signaling Kavanaugh’s nomination will likely be delayed.

Murkowski, a key swing vote, told reporters that she supports Flake’s request to delay a vote for up to a week

"I support the FBI having an opportunity to bring some closure to this," she said.

Murkowski and GOP Sen. Susan Collins (Maine) are the two Republicans who remain undecided on Kavanaugh’s nomination.

Collins told reporters on Friday afternoon that asking for the one-week delay to let the FBI investigate was an “important development” that she hoped would let the Senate “go forward.”

Flake pointed to Collins and Murkowski as "pivotal" and "very much involved" in the negotiations inside McConnell's office. Asked if he knew they had his back when he made the decision to ask for a delay, Flake added: "I assumed. We've talked. I knew that ... people needed to be more comfortable moving ahead." 

Democrats quickly lauded Flake for his effort to let the FBI investigate the current allegations.

“I applaud Senator Jeff Flake’s decision to rise above the partisan circus on display during this entire process. It took courage to take a stand and call for a one-week FBI investigation to get to the bottom of the allegations against Judge Kavanaugh. ... It is what is right and fair for Dr. Ford, Judge Kavanaugh, and the American people,” said Democratic Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinTrump nominee faces Senate hurdles to securing public lands post OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Watchdog accuses Commerce of holding up 'Sharpiegate' report | Climate change erases millennia of cooling: study | Senate nixes proposal limiting Energy Department's control on nuclear agency budget Senate nixes proposal limiting Energy Department's control on nuclear agency budget MORE (W.Va.), a potential swing vote.

Flake noted that he had talks with Democrats, including Sen. Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsHillicon Valley: Facebook takes down 'boogaloo' network after pressure | Election security measure pulled from Senate bill | FCC officially designating Huawei, ZTE as threats Democrats, voting rights groups pressure Senate to approve mail-in voting resources To safeguard our elections, Democrats and Republicans must work together MORE (Del.), but said most of the momentum came from talks with his Republican colleagues “who feel more comfortable moving ahead to a final vote once the FBI has done a supplemental background check."

Several GOP senators, including Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchDACA remains in place, but Dreamers still in limbo Bottom line Bottom line MORE (Utah) and John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.), declined to comment, citing a pending statement from Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyCongress gears up for battle over expiring unemployment benefits US, Mexico set for new post-NAFTA trade era Senators press IRS chief on stimulus check pitfalls MORE (R-Iowa).

Kennedy said Republicans had reached an “accord,” but declined to provide details.

The decision comes a day after Christine Blasey Ford and Kavanaugh testified publicly before the Judiciary panel in a rollercoaster hearing about the sexual assault allegations.

Ford delivered gripping testimony accusing Kavanaugh of pinning her to a bed and trying to remove her clothes at a house gathering while the pair where in high school in 1982.

Kavanaugh has flatly denied the allegations and blasted the confirmation process as a "national disgrace" during the hearing Thursday.

– Updated: 5:08 p.m.