Collins: Trump’s comments on Ford are ‘plain wrong’

Collins: Trump’s comments on Ford are ‘plain wrong’
© Greg Nash

GOP Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Energy: Perry to step down as Energy secretary | Future of big-game hunting council up in the air | Dems lose vote against EPA power plant rule Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes MORE (Maine) on Wednesday said President TrumpDonald John TrumpZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Trump leaning toward keeping a couple hundred troops in eastern Syria: report Warren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' MORE’s comments on Christine Blasey Ford were “plain wrong,” making her the second swing-vote senator to denounce the president's rhetoric.

“The president’s comments were just plain wrong,” Collins told reporters who were camped outside of an unrelated Senate Aging Committee hearing, which Collins oversees.

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Trump appeared to mock Ford, the first woman to publicly accuse Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault, during a rally in Mississippi on Tuesday night.

"'How did you get home?'" Trump said, imitating Ford. "'I don't remember.' 'How'd you get there?' 'I don't remember.' 'Where is the place?' 'I don't remember.' 'How many years ago was it?' 'I don't know.'"

Collins is the second undecided Republican senator to criticize Trump’s remarks. Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeVulnerable senators hold the key to Trump's fate Trump's GOP impeachment firewall holds strong How to survive an impeachment MORE (Ariz.) told NBC’s “Today” that the president's comments were “kind of appalling.”

Kavanaugh remains short of the simple majority needed for him to ultimately be confirmed in the Senate, and Republicans are worried female voters will turn against GOP candidates in the November midterm elections.

Republicans hold a 51-49 majority, meaning they cannot afford to lose more than one GOP senator without needing help from Democrats to confirm Kavanaugh.

Collins, Flake and Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiMulvaney defends decision to host G-7 at Doral: Trump 'considers himself to be in the hospitality business' Trump says his Doral resort will no longer host G-7 after backlash Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe MORE (R-Alaska) are viewed as the Republican swing votes. No Democrats have said they will support Kavanaugh, though Sens. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Energy: Perry to step down as Energy secretary | Future of big-game hunting council up in the air | Dems lose vote against EPA power plant rule Senate Dems lose forced vote against EPA power plant rule Schumer seeks focus on health care amid impeachment fever MORE (D-W.Va.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampThe Hill's Morning Report — Biden steadies in third debate as top tier remains the same Trump wins 60 percent approval in rural areas of key states Pence to push new NAFTA deal in visit to Iowa MORE (D-N.D.) remain undecided.

The Senate is expected to move forward with Kavanaugh's nomination this week upon conclusion of an FBI investigation stemming from the sexual assault allegations against him.