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Grassley: No corroboration of Kavanaugh accusers' allegations in FBI report

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyHouse unveils antitrust package to rein in tech giants Iowa governor questions lack of notice on migrant children flights to Des Moines Senate crafts Pelosi alternative on drug prices MORE (R-Iowa) said Thursday there’s no corroboration of sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in a supplementary FBI report submitted to the Senate.

“I’ve now received a committee staff briefing on the FBI’s supplement to Judge Kavanaugh’s background investigation file. There’s nothing in it that we didn’t already know,” Grassley said in a statement.

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“These uncorroborated accusations have been unequivocally and repeatedly rejected by Judge Kavanaugh, and neither the Judiciary Committee nor the FBI could locate any third parties who can attest to any of the allegations. There’s also no contemporaneous evidence,” he added.

"This investigation found no hint of misconduct ... I’ll be voting to confirm Judge Kavanaugh.”

Grassley made his statement after being briefed by Senate GOP staff who viewed the report.

Senators have been filing into and out of the secure compartmented information facility in the Capitol Visitor Center to view the report Thursday morning. They are being granted access to the results of the confidential FBI background investigation into the allegations brought forward against Kavanaugh by Christine Blasey Ford and two other women. Kavanaugh has denied the allegations.

GOP lawmakers said the FBI failed to find any significant evidence backing Ford’s claims after interviewing an additional 10 witnesses — going beyond the four witnesses that a group of three GOP lawmakers, Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSunday shows preview: Biden foreign policy in focus as Dem tensions boil up back home Why the Democrats need Joe Manchin White House briefed on bipartisan infrastructure deal but says questions remain MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiWhite House briefed on bipartisan infrastructure deal but says questions remain Bipartisan Senate group announces infrastructure deal The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden mission abroad: reward friends, constrain adversaries MORE (Alaska) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeOn The Trail: Arizona is microcosm of battle for the GOP Trump looms large over fractured Arizona GOP Why Republican politicians are sticking with Trump MORE (Ariz.), requested.

“They wound up interviewing 10 people, not four. They were given the latitude they wanted, nobody told them where to go, who to interview or how to interview them,” said Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamProgressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema GOP senators applaud Biden for global vaccine donation plans Lindsey Graham: Dismissal of Wuhan lab leak theory cost Trump 2020 election MORE (R-S.C.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, after reviewing the report.

“The main thing for me is the FBI did a professional job,” he added. “I didn’t learn anything I didn’t already know.”

Collins, a key swing vote, praised the thoroughness of the FBI report.

“It appears to be a very thorough investigation,” she told CNN.

Flake, another key vote, said he saw “no additional corroborating information” in an initial review of the FBI report.

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinProgressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema 'If this thing qualifies, I'm toast': An oral history of the Gray Davis recall in California The big myths about recall elections MORE (Calif.), the ranking Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, initially declined to comment after reviewing the document.

She later told reporters that the FBI report "looks to be the product of an incomplete investigation that was limited."

"Perhaps by the White House," she added. "I don't know."

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) said he disagreed with Grassley's assessment "that there was no hint of misconduct" in the FBI's report.

"We had many fears that this was a very limited process that would constrain the FBI from getting the facts. ... Those fears have been realized," Schumer said.

Deputy White House press secretary Raj Shah said in a statement early Thursday that the White House is now "fully confident the Senate will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.”

"This is now the 7th. time the FBI has investigated Judge Kavanaugh," President TrumpDonald TrumpEx-DOJ official Rosenstein says he was not aware of subpoena targeting Democrats: report Ex-Biden adviser says Birx told him she hoped election turned out 'a certain way' Cheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' MORE later tweeted. "If we made it 100, it would still not be good enough for the Obstructionist Democrats."

Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMaher goes after Manchin: 'Most powerful Republican in the Senate' Supreme Court confounding its partisan critics Why the Democrats need Joe Manchin MORE (R-Ky.) has vowed to bring Kavanaugh's nomination to the full Senate this week, though several key GOP and Democratic senators have so far refused to say how they will vote. 

—Last updated at 11:49 a.m.