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GOP loads up lame-duck agenda as House control teeters

Republican lawmakers are packing their agenda for the lame-duck session after the Nov. 6 elections, recognizing it could be their last shot for at least two years to pass legislation under unified GOP control of Congress.

Their top priorities include spending legislation, the farm bill, a package to extend expiring tax breaks, criminal justice reform, reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act and passing the Jobs Act 3.0, which is intended to spur capital formation.

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Also high on the to-do list is a batch of executive and judicial branch nominees — including 36 federal District Court and three circuit court judges. 

Asked about the agenda for December, Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynThe Hill's Campaign Report: Obama to hit the campaign trail l Biden's eye-popping cash advantage l New battleground polls favor Biden Quinnipiac poll finds Biden, Trump tied in Texas Biden endorses Texas Democratic House candidate Julie Oliver MORE (Texas) said, “Nominations, more nominations.”

Many of the legislative items on the GOP agenda could be weighed down or even pushed aside by a partisan brawl over President TrumpDonald John TrumpMore than 300 military family members endorse Biden Five takeaways from the final Trump-Biden debate Biden: 'I would transition from the oil industry' MORE’s demand that Congress fund construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

“There’s going to be a major fight over that and that’s going to make progress on other areas difficult,” said Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump's erratic tweets upend stimulus talks; COVID-19 spreads in White House Republican fears grow over rising Democratic tide Bottom line MORE (R-Okla.), a member of the House Appropriations Committee.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerFive takeaways on Iran, Russia election interference Pelosi calls Iran 'bad actor' but not equivalent to Russia on election interference Schumer says briefing on Iranian election interference didn't convince him effort was meant to hurt Trump MORE (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday opened the door to a possible deal by saying Democrats are not opposed to strengthening the U.S. border.

“We Democrats believe in strong border security,” he said, noting that the Senate immigration reform bill backed by Democrats in 2013 included billions of dollars in border security funding. “We’re going to keep fighting for the strongest, toughest border security.”

Cole later said Schumer’s remarks could pave the way for a compromise linking border wall funding to legislation shielding immigrants who came to the country illegally as children — known as "Dreamers" — from deportation.

“The natural deal is DACA and the wall,” he said, referring to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that Trump rescinded last year, putting young immigrants at risk of removal.

But Republicans acknowledge that getting a deal on the border wall and other contentious issues will depend on the outcome of the midterm elections.

“What kind of mood the Democrats are in, I don’t think we know,” Cole said.

Schumer on Tuesday said he would discuss Democratic priorities for the lame duck at a later date.

Senate Republican Conference Chairman John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneGOP power shift emerges with Trump, McConnell GOP coronavirus bill blocked as deal remains elusive Clyburn predicts action on coronavirus relief after elections MORE (S.D.) said there’s strong desire among GOP lawmakers to pass a package of so-called tax extenders and to make some corrections to the $1.5 trillion tax-reform legislation Congress passed last year.

“There will be an attempt to try and get as much done as we can before the end of this calendar year,” Thune said. “We could get something done on finishing up the tax reform stuff of last year, technical corrections.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell says 'no concerns' after questions about health Overnight Health Care: Trump says he hopes Supreme Court strikes down ObamaCare | FDA approves remdesivir as COVID-19 treatment | Dems threaten to subpoena HHS over allegations of political interference at CDC The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump, Biden face off for last time on the debate stage MORE (R-Ky.) on Wednesday told reporters that he would put criminal justice reform legislation on the floor in the lame-duck session if it can garner 60 votes to overcome a potential filibuster.

“Criminal justice has been much discussed,” he said. “What we’ll do after the election is take a whip count and if there are more than 60 senators who want to go forward on that bill, we’ll find time to address it.”

That legislation combines a House-passed prison reform bill, the First Step Act, with bipartisan sentencing reform provisions crafted by the Senate. It is a top priority of senior White House adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump creates federal council on global tree planting initiative | Green group pushes for answers on delayed climate report | Carbon dioxide emissions may not surpass 2019 levels until 2027: analysis Trump creates federal government council on global tree planting initiative Kardashian West uses star power to pressure US on Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict MORE, the president’s son-in-law.

Trump signaled he could support the criminal justice reform compromise when he met with Republican senators in early August.

McConnell has never been a big fan of the legislation, which divides his caucus, but Trump’s support is a major factor to consider.

“We’re going to try real hard to get it done,” said Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOn The Money: Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi bullish, Trump tempers optimism | Analysis: Nearly 1M have run out of jobless benefits Grassley: Voters should be skeptical of Biden's pledge to not raise middle class taxes GOP to Trump: Focus on policy MORE (R-Iowa), who helped put the compromise together.

Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsSenate GOP's campaign arm releases first ad targeting Bollier in Kansas The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump, Biden hit campaign trail in Florida National Republicans will spend to defend Kansas Senate seat MORE (R-Kan.) says it now looks certain that the farm bill, which has been stuck in protracted Senate and House negotiations, won’t move until after the election.

“We’re making progress, we are closing out titles,” he said.

GOP lawmakers are also pressing for action on reforms that have been under discussion for months by the Joint Select Committee on Budget and Appropriations Reform.

Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordMcConnell says he would give Trump-backed coronavirus deal a vote in Senate Senators push for Turkey sanctions after reports Ankara used Russian system to detect US-made jets McConnell: Plan is to confirm Trump's Supreme Court pick before election MORE (R-Okla.), a member of the task force, said Congress needs to pass the reforms and they need to be signed by the president by the end of the year, at which time the select committee will dissolve.

Also up for consideration is legislation overhauling how Congress handles sexual harassment claims and bills designed to improve the security of U.S. elections and to slap sanctions on foreign powers that try to interfere in U.S. elections.

Senate and House negotiators have yet to reconcile measures passed by each chamber dealing with sexual harassment, and the election security measure could hinge on what, if any, meddling is seen in connection with the midterm elections.

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandInternal Democratic poll: Desiree Tims gains on Mike Turner in Ohio House race Hillicon Valley: Facebook, Twitter's handling of New York Post article raises election night concerns | FCC to move forward with considering order targeting tech's liability shield | YouTube expands polices to tackle QAnon Democrats question Amazon over reported interference of workers' rights to organize MORE (D-N.Y.), who played a prominent role in pushing the Senate to pass sexual harassment legislation earlier this year, said she would talk to McConnell about its timing after the election, adding that Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanMcCarthy faces pushback from anxious Republicans over interview comments Pelosi and Trump go a full year without speaking Jordan vows to back McCarthy as leader even if House loses more GOP seats MORE (R-Wis.) will also be needed to help push the measure toward the finish line.

“I will speak to Sen. McConnell again because we’re just waiting on Republican leadership,” she said. “We’re waiting on both Speaker Ryan and Leader McConnell to decide to let the bills be conferenced.”

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntPower players play chess match on COVID-19 aid GOP to Trump: Focus on policy Low-flying helicopters to measure radiation levels in DC before inauguration MORE (R-Mo.), who has jurisdiction over the issue as chairman of the Senate Rules Committee, said part of the problem is that the House had been out of session in August and recently recessed again to allow lawmakers to campaign for the midterms.

“If you look back at the end of July on, there have been maybe 10 days when House and Senate members have really been here at the same time,” he said.

Blunt, who also has jurisdiction over the election security legislation, said he was uncertain of its prospects in the lame-duck session.

“I don’t know about that. We will certainly look at the election and see what happened,” he added. “I’m never very optimistic about a lame duck.”

“It will be totally dependent on what happens Election Day, the whole atmosphere,” Blunt said. 

Cornyn, the second-ranking GOP leader in the Senate, said Congress needs to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act.

“That goes until Dec. 7, so we’ll need to address that before then,” he said.

Republican chairmen are pushing to get some of their pet priorities onto the loaded schedule.

Senate Banking Committee Chairman Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoBarrett says she did not strike down ObamaCare in moot court case GOP Sen. Thom Tillis tests positive for coronavirus 22 GOP attorneys general urge Congress to confirm Barrett as Supreme Court justice MORE (R-Idaho) said he hopes the Senate will take up the House-passed Jobs Act 3.0, which addresses capital formation.

And Thune, chairman of the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, said he wants McConnell to schedule time on the AV Start Act, which would set national standards for the testing and deployment of self-driving cars.

He also wants action on legislation known as the Streamline Act that would promote the rapid deployment of 5G networks.