Senate leaders strike deal on 15 judicial nominees, setting up early recess

Senate leaders strike deal on 15 judicial nominees, setting up early recess
© Stefani Reynolds

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKey House and Senate health leaders reach deal to stop surprise medical bills Biden: 'No party should have too much power' Overnight Energy: Pelosi vows bold action to counter 'existential' climate threat | Trump jokes new light bulbs don't make him look as good | 'Forever chemicals' measure pulled from defense bill MORE (R-Ky.) and Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOvernight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson — Democrats call on Supreme Court to block Louisiana abortion law | Michigan governor seeks to pause Medicaid work requirements | New front in fight over Medicaid block grants House, Senate Democrats call on Supreme Court to block Louisiana abortion law Why a second Trump term and a Democratic Congress could be a nightmare scenario for the GOP MORE (N.Y.) have struck a deal to vote on a package of 15 judges and recess the Senate until the Nov. 6 election.

All of the nominees, including three circuit court nominees, are expected to pass despite opposition from liberal groups that fought an all-out-battle to block Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughHere are the Senate Republicans who could vote to convict Trump Supreme Court denies Trump request to immediately resume federal executions House, Senate Democrats call on Supreme Court to block Louisiana abortion law MORE earlier this month.

The development is welcome news for vulnerable incumbents in tough races eager to get back home to campaign.

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The Senate had been scheduled to be in session until Oct. 26.

Now most lawmakers likely won’t return to Washington until the week after the Nov. 6 election.

The deal is a bigger help to Democrats, who have more members of their conference locked in tough races, but it also helps vulnerable Republicans, such as Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzDemocrats express confidence in case as impeachment speeds forward Chuck Todd challenges Cruz after senator pushes theory that Ukraine meddled in election Sunday shows — Nadler: A jury would convict Trump in 'three minutes flat' MORE (R-Texas).

“I’m always happier to be in Texas,” Cruz told reporters when asked whether he would prefer to be campaigning or slowing working through judicial nominees over the next two weeks.

Liberal activists criticized Schumer Thursday afternoon for even considering the deal.

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“There is no reason Democrats should be making any deals with Mitch McConnell to make it easier to confirm more radical conservatives to the courts. Especially not after Kavanaugh,” Leah Greenberg, the co-executive director of Indivisible, a liberal advocacy group, tweeted.

Joan McCarter, a writer for Daily Kos, an activist liberal blog, argued that Democrats should stay in Washington to drag out consideration of the nominees while colleagues in tough races go home to campaign.

“You would have plenty of Democratic senators willing to stick around D.C. to gum up the Senate works while your red state incumbents could go home and campaign. They need you to be fighting McConnell, particularly after the Brett Kavanaugh debacle,” she wrote Thursday afternoon.

McConnell at around 4:30 pm Thursday circulated a hotline request to vote on the nominees, with two minutes of debate on each equally divided between the parties.

The chamber began voting on the package of nominees shortly before 5 pm.

The nominees include David James Porter of Pennsylvania to sit on the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals, Ryan Nelson of Idaho to sit on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and Richard Sullivan of New York to sit on the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals.

Some District Court nominees include William Ray of Georgia to serve for the Northern District of Georgia, Liles Clifton Burke of Alabama to the North District of Alabama, Michael Juneau of Louisiana to serve for the Western District of Louisiana and Mark Norris Sr. of Tennessee to the Western District of Tennessee.