Senate leaders strike deal on 15 judicial nominees, setting up early recess

Senate leaders strike deal on 15 judicial nominees, setting up early recess
© Stefani Reynolds

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump, Dems prep for Mueller report's release McConnell touts Trump support, Supreme Court fights in reelection video Why Ken Cuccinelli should be Trump's choice for DHS MORE (R-Ky.) and Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSchumer slams Justice Dept over 'pre-damage control' on Mueller report Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Sanders welcomes fight with Trump over 'Medicare for all' | DOJ attorney in ObamaCare case leaving | NYC mayor defends vaccination mandate | Ohio gov signs 'heartbeat' abortion bill Dems see room for Abrams in crowded presidential field MORE (N.Y.) have struck a deal to vote on a package of 15 judges and recess the Senate until the Nov. 6 election.

All of the nominees, including three circuit court nominees, are expected to pass despite opposition from liberal groups that fought an all-out-battle to block Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughOn The Money: Cain 'very committed' to Fed bid despite opposition | Pelosi warns no US-UK trade deal if Brexit harms Irish peace | Ivanka Trump says she turned down World Bank job GOP strategist: Alabama Republicans need to 'gather around' candidate who 'is not Roy Moore' Warren praises Ocasio-Cortez in Time 100 MORE earlier this month.

The development is welcome news for vulnerable incumbents in tough races eager to get back home to campaign.

The Senate had been scheduled to be in session until Oct. 26.

Now most lawmakers likely won’t return to Washington until the week after the Nov. 6 election.

The deal is a bigger help to Democrats, who have more members of their conference locked in tough races, but it also helps vulnerable Republicans, such as Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzO'Rourke sweeps through Virginia looking to energize campaign Disney to donate million to rebuild Notre Dame Celebs start opening their wallets for 2020 Dems MORE (R-Texas).

“I’m always happier to be in Texas,” Cruz told reporters when asked whether he would prefer to be campaigning or slowing working through judicial nominees over the next two weeks.

Liberal activists criticized Schumer Thursday afternoon for even considering the deal.

“There is no reason Democrats should be making any deals with Mitch McConnell to make it easier to confirm more radical conservatives to the courts. Especially not after Kavanaugh,” Leah Greenberg, the co-executive director of Indivisible, a liberal advocacy group, tweeted.

Joan McCarter, a writer for Daily Kos, an activist liberal blog, argued that Democrats should stay in Washington to drag out consideration of the nominees while colleagues in tough races go home to campaign.

“You would have plenty of Democratic senators willing to stick around D.C. to gum up the Senate works while your red state incumbents could go home and campaign. They need you to be fighting McConnell, particularly after the Brett Kavanaugh debacle,” she wrote Thursday afternoon.

McConnell at around 4:30 pm Thursday circulated a hotline request to vote on the nominees, with two minutes of debate on each equally divided between the parties.

The chamber began voting on the package of nominees shortly before 5 pm.

The nominees include David James Porter of Pennsylvania to sit on the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals, Ryan Nelson of Idaho to sit on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and Richard Sullivan of New York to sit on the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals.

Some District Court nominees include William Ray of Georgia to serve for the Northern District of Georgia, Liles Clifton Burke of Alabama to the North District of Alabama, Michael Juneau of Louisiana to serve for the Western District of Louisiana and Mark Norris Sr. of Tennessee to the Western District of Tennessee.