Poll: More Americans disapprove than approve of Kavanaugh's confirmation

Poll: More Americans disapprove than approve of Kavanaugh's confirmation
© Greg Nash

More Americans oppose Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughConstitutional conservatives need to oppose the national emergency Kavanaugh shows his stripes on Supreme Court's 'shadow docket' Ginsburg back at Supreme Court MORE’s confirmation than support it, according to a new ABC News/Washington Post poll released Friday.

The poll showed that 41 percent of Americans support his confirmation while 51 percent oppose it.

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 More Americans also support a deeper Congressional investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct by Kavanaugh while he was in high school and college, or by a 53-43 percent margin, the poll shows.

While men are roughly divided over the prospect, with 47 percent supporting an investigation and 49 percent opposing, women support it by a 21-point margin, or by 58 percent to 37 percent.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), the ranking member on the House Judiciary Committee, has said the House could conduct an investigation into the allegations and perjury accusations if the Democrats win the chamber in the midterm elections.

Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court to replace retired Justice Anthony Kennedy was thrown into tumult after three women publicly accused Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct.

Kavanaugh has strongly denied the claims, including at a hearing in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee to address accusations from the first accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, that he had forced himself on her during a high school party in the early 1980s.

Democrats quickly pounced on the allegations and Kavanaugh’s testimony, calling for an FBI investigation into the allegations and calling into question whether Kavanaugh’s temperament made him a good fit for the Supreme Court. 

The FBI conducted an investigation that found no corroborating evidence into some of the sexual misconduct claims, but Democrats said the inquiry was too limited in time and scope.

The Senate confirmed Kavanaugh by a 50-48 vote last Saturday.

The Supreme Court fight has energized political bases across the spectrum and raised the stakes in several Senate races just one month before the midterm elections.

The ABC News/Washington Post poll surveyed 1,144 adults from Oct. 8-11 and has a margin of error of +/- 3.5 percent.