Cornyn: 'All the money in the world' won't help O'Rourke win Texas

Cornyn: 'All the money in the world' won't help O'Rourke win Texas
© Anna Moneymaker
Senate Majority Whip John CornynJohn CornynThis week: Democrats move funding bills as caps deal remains elusive This week: Democrats move funding bills as caps deal remains elusive Trump puts GOP in tough spot with remarks on foreign 'dirt' MORE (R-Texas) on Friday brushed off a record-breaking fundraising haul from Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeProgressive activist: Democratic nominee will 'need to ride a little bit to the center' Poll: Biden leads Sanders by 22 points Poll: Biden leads Sanders by 22 points MORE (D), saying it won't be enough for the Democratic challenger to unseat Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Health Care: Democrats attack after Trump revives talk of ObamaCare replacement | Cruz, Ocasio-Cortez efforts on birth control face major obstacles | CVS investing M to fight teen e-cig use Overnight Health Care: Democrats attack after Trump revives talk of ObamaCare replacement | Cruz, Ocasio-Cortez efforts on birth control face major obstacles | CVS investing M to fight teen e-cig use Biden says he will beat Trump in Texas, Georgia and South Carolina MORE (R-Texas).
 
O'Rourke's campaign announced Friday that he raised more than $38 million during the third quarter, which ended Sept. 30. Cruz, who is seeking a second Senate term, brought in $12 million during the same three-month period.
 
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Cornyn — who has at times had a strained relationship with Cruz but is supporting his campaign — acknowledged that O'Rourke raised "a lot of money," but he predicted Cruz will still win when voters head to the polls on Nov. 6.
 
"I think all the money in the world is not going to help Beto at this point because I think he is self-identified as a national Democrat, which means he's way too liberal to get elected in Texas," Cornyn told reporters.
 
O'Rourke, who was elected to the House in 2012, has pledged not to take money from PACs in his Senate bid. In a video posted to Twitter he said the third-quarter funds came from more than 800,000 contributions.
 
Cornyn said "adoring [media] coverage" explains part of the enthusiasm for O'Rourke's campaign.
 
"He's obviously captured a lot of people's imagination and the ability to raise money through these portals — like ActBlue, small donations — is obviously allowed him to raise a bunch of money," Cornyn said. "Good for him, but I still don't think he's going to win."
 
O'Rourke is considered an underdog in his race against Cruz, despite his fundraising numbers.
 
A survey from Quinnipiac University Poll released Thursday found Cruz with a 9-point lead. It's the same edge Cruz had in the same poll three weeks ago.
 
Cornyn said the poll is "probably in the ballpark" for the race, but predicted Cruz will "win by double digits" next month.
 
Cruz has a 7-point lead over O'Rourke in the race, according to a RealClearPolitics average of polling.
 
Cruz and O'Rourke have been locked in a tighter-than-expected campaign for months, bolstering hopes among Democrats that they might be able to flip the seat.
 
In addition to Texas, Democrats are trying to pick up Senate seats in Tennessee and Arizona, where GOP Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerPress: How 'Nervous Nancy' trumped Trump Press: How 'Nervous Nancy' trumped Trump Amash gets standing ovation at first town hall after calling for Trump's impeachment MORE (Tenn.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeDemocrats needle GOP on standing up to Trump Democrats needle GOP on standing up to Trump Amash gets standing ovation at first town hall after calling for Trump's impeachment MORE (Ariz.) are retiring from Congress. They're also hoping to unseat Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerThis week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary MORE (Nev.), the only Senate Republican up for reelection in a state won by Hillary Clinton in 2016.
 
Rep. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnElection security bills face GOP buzzsaw Election security bills face GOP buzzsaw Trump puts GOP in tough spot with remarks on foreign 'dirt' MORE (R) is leading the Tennessee race by more than 5 percentage points on average, according to RealClearPolitics. But a New York Times/Siena College poll released Friday had up her 14 points over Democratic candidate Phil Bredesen, a former governor of Tennessee.
 
Cornyn added on Friday that he was feelingly "increasingly optimistic" that Republicans would hold their majority in the Senate, where they currently have a 51-49 advantage over Democrats. He pointed to Tennessee as well as races in Missouri and North Dakota, where Democratic Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillConservatives spark threat of bloody GOP primaries Congress needs to work to combat the poverty, abuse and neglect issues that children face Lobbying world MORE and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampLobbying World Pro-trade group targets Democratic leadership in push for new NAFTA On The Money: Stocks sink on Trump tariff threat | GOP caught off guard by new trade turmoil | Federal deficit grew 38 percent this fiscal year | Banks avoid taking position in Trump, Dem subpoena fight MORE, respectively, are up for reelection in states that President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says 'Failing New York Times' should be held 'fully accountable' over Russia report Trump says 'Failing New York Times' should be held 'fully accountable' over Russia report Trump tweets ICE will begin removing 'millions' of undocumented migrants MORE won by double digits in 2016.
 
"All of the races seem to be moving in our direction," said Cornyn, who gave some credit to the recent confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughSupreme Court hands Virginia Democrats a win in gerrymandering case Supreme Court hands Virginia Democrats a win in gerrymandering case Supreme Court rules defendants can be tried on state and federal charges, potentially impacting Manafort MORE. "I just think the Kavanaugh hearing was important. But it's not just that, but the realization of who would be in charge if, in fact, Democrats did win the majority."