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GOP to retain Senate majority

Republicans are guaranteed to keep control of the Senate after netting early victories by flipping four Democratic seats and winning a marquee race in Texas.

GOP candidates scored major victories in Indiana, Missouri and North Dakota, while several other toss-up races remain too close to call, paving the way for the party to potentially expand its 51-49 majority.

Businessman Mike Braun (R) unseated Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) — marking the first red-state Democrat to lose on Tuesday and giving the GOP an early seat flip.

Three more Democrats followed: Sens. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampMajor unions back Fudge for Agriculture secretary Five House Democrats who could join Biden Cabinet Biden names John Kerry as 'climate czar' in new administration MORE (N.D.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillDemocrats must turn around Utah police arrest man driving 130 mph claiming he was going to kill former Missouri senator McCaskill congratulates Hawley on birth of daughter MORE (Mo.) and Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonThe Hill's Morning Report - Fearing defeat, Trump claims 'illegal' ballots The Hill's Morning Report - Biden inches closer to victory Senate Democrats want to avoid Kavanaugh 2.0 MORE (Fla.).

The red-state Democratic losses came after Republicans avoided a major upset in Texas, where Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeMexican president breaks with other world leaders, refusing to acknowledge Biden win until election is finalized Mexico emerging as foreign policy challenge for Biden Beyoncé sports pro-Biden mask on Instagram MORE (D) shot into an early lead but was ultimately unable to overcome Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzO'Brien on 2024 talk: 'There's all kinds of speculation out there' Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation McSally, staff asked to break up maskless photo op inside Capitol MORE (R).

Absent a last-minute upset in a seat controlled by Republicans, the three Democratic losses and the GOP win in Texas guarantees Republicans will hold onto the chamber, even with undecided races in Arizona and Nevada.

Democrats entered Election Day looking to defend seats in 10 states that Trump won in 2016, presenting them with an uphill battle to take back the Senate or maintain the GOP's slim majority.

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Sen. Jon Tester (Mont.) is the last vulnerable Democrat whose race has yet to be called. Though he remains in the lead against GOP challenger Matt Rosendale, the race has tightened as more precincts have begun reporting.

One race that will not be decided on Tuesday is a special election in Mississippi, where Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R) was hoping to prevent a runoff election for her Senate seat.

Hyde-Smith and Democrat Mike Espy, as the top two candidates, will advance to a Nov. 27 runoff, but the outcome of that race will not determine control of the Senate.

Even with the Mississippi race undecided, Democrats could sweep the remaining battleground states and fall short, with Republicans holding a 52-47 majority in that scenario.

If Democrats sweep the remaining battleground states and Republicans ultimately win Mississippi, where Trump remains popular, that would give Republicans a 53-47 majority.

Democrats have gotten some good news on Tuesday night. Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinMajor unions back Fudge for Agriculture secretary Voters split on eliminating the filibuster: poll OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Barrasso to seek top spot on Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Forest Service finalizes rule weakening environmental review of its projects | Biden to enlist Agriculture, Transportation agencies in climate fight MORE (D-W.Va.) held off state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey in what was expected to be a competitive race.

Meanwhile, Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Rick Scott tests positive for coronavirus Grassley tests positive for coronavirus MORE (D-Va.) and Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownOn The Money: Democrats accuse Mnuchin of sabotaging economy in dispute with Fed | Trump administration proposal takes aim at bank pledges to avoid fossil fuel financing | JPMorgan: Economy will shrink in first quarter due to COVID-19 spike Democrats accuse Mnuchin of sabotaging economy in dispute with Fed McSally, staff asked to break up maskless photo op inside Capitol MORE (D-Ohio) easily won reelection, and voters in New Jersey decided to send Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezDemocrats urge YouTube to remove election misinformation, step up efforts ahead of Georgia runoff Democratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Trump appointee sparks bipartisan furor for politicizing media agency MORE back to Washington for another six-year term.

But the defeat in Texas comes after Tennessee, another potential pickup, was quickly taken out of reach for Democrats with Rep. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnSunday shows preview: Biden transition, COVID-19 spike in spotlight Senate GOP to drop documentary series days before election hitting China, Democrats over coronavirus Senate Judiciary to vote on subpoena for Twitter CEO next week MORE (R-Tenn.) defeating former Gov. Phil Bredesen (D) after holding a lead in the polls heading into Tuesday.

Democrats are still eyeing potential pick-ups in two western states with seats currently held by Republicans — Arizona and Nevada.

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) had a slight lead over Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyTrump nominee's long road to Fed may be dead end McSally, staff asked to break up maskless photo op inside Capitol McSally's final floor speech: 'I gave it my all, and I left it all on the field' MORE (R-Ariz.) heading into Tuesday as they battle to succeed retiring Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeProfiles in cowardice: Trump's Senate enablers McSally concedes Arizona Senate race The Hill's Morning Report - ObamaCare front and center; transition standoff continues MORE (R). If Sinema is victorious it would be the first time since 1988 that Arizonans have elected a Democrat to the Senate.

Meanwhile, Democrats held a lead among early voters in Nevada, where Democrats are feeling bullish about their ability to unseat Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (R-Nev.), the only Republican senator up for reelection in a state won by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonValadao unseats Cox in election rematch Trump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College Federal workers stuck it out with Trump — now, we're ready to get back to work MORE in 2016.

Updated at 12:54 a.m.