GOP to retain Senate majority

Republicans are guaranteed to keep control of the Senate after netting early victories by flipping four Democratic seats and winning a marquee race in Texas.

GOP candidates scored major victories in Indiana, Missouri and North Dakota, while several other toss-up races remain too close to call, paving the way for the party to potentially expand its 51-49 majority.

Businessman Mike Braun (R) unseated Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) — marking the first red-state Democrat to lose on Tuesday and giving the GOP an early seat flip.

Three more Democrats followed: Sens. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn Heitkamp11 former Democratic senators call for 'meaningful reform to Senate rules' Harry Reid, political pugilist and longtime Senate majority leader, dies Virginia loss lays bare Democrats' struggle with rural voters MORE (N.D.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillBiden, lawmakers mourn Harry Reid Harry Reid, political pugilist and longtime Senate majority leader, dies On The Trail: Trump-inspired challengers target GOP governors MORE (Mo.) and Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonOvernight Energy & Environment — Earth records its hottest years ever Global temperatures in past seven years hottest ever observed, new data show NASA welcomes chief scientist, senior climate adviser in new dual role MORE (Fla.).

The red-state Democratic losses came after Republicans avoided a major upset in Texas, where Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke says he raised record .2M since launching campaign for Texas governor Eleven interesting races to watch in 2022 Cruz bullish on his 2024 chances: 'The runner-up is almost always the next nominee' MORE (D) shot into an early lead but was ultimately unable to overcome Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzHillicon Valley — Senate panel advances major antitrust bill Senate panel advances bill blocking tech giants from favoring own products Lawmakers press Biden admin to send more military aid to Ukraine MORE (R).

Absent a last-minute upset in a seat controlled by Republicans, the three Democratic losses and the GOP win in Texas guarantees Republicans will hold onto the chamber, even with undecided races in Arizona and Nevada.

Democrats entered Election Day looking to defend seats in 10 states that Trump won in 2016, presenting them with an uphill battle to take back the Senate or maintain the GOP's slim majority.

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Sen. Jon Tester (Mont.) is the last vulnerable Democrat whose race has yet to be called. Though he remains in the lead against GOP challenger Matt Rosendale, the race has tightened as more precincts have begun reporting.

One race that will not be decided on Tuesday is a special election in Mississippi, where Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R) was hoping to prevent a runoff election for her Senate seat.

Hyde-Smith and Democrat Mike Espy, as the top two candidates, will advance to a Nov. 27 runoff, but the outcome of that race will not determine control of the Senate.

Even with the Mississippi race undecided, Democrats could sweep the remaining battleground states and fall short, with Republicans holding a 52-47 majority in that scenario.

If Democrats sweep the remaining battleground states and Republicans ultimately win Mississippi, where Trump remains popular, that would give Republicans a 53-47 majority.

Democrats have gotten some good news on Tuesday night. Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinArizona Democratic Party executive board censures Sinema Biden seeks to save what he can from Build Back Better On The Money — Labor chief touts efforts to promote job growth MORE (D-W.Va.) held off state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey in what was expected to be a competitive race.

Meanwhile, Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats call on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans Manchin, Sinema join GOP to sink filibuster change for voting bill Desperate Dems signal support for cutting Biden bill down in size MORE (D-Va.) and Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Biden calls Intel's B investment to build chip factories a tool for economic recovery Democrats see good chance of Garland prosecuting Trump MORE (D-Ohio) easily won reelection, and voters in New Jersey decided to send Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezDems block Cruz's Nord Stream 2 sanctions bill Overnight Defense & National Security — Differences remain between NATO, Russia Senate Democrats unveil bill sanctioning Russia over Ukraine MORE back to Washington for another six-year term.

But the defeat in Texas comes after Tennessee, another potential pickup, was quickly taken out of reach for Democrats with Rep. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnSunday shows preview: Democrats' struggle for voting rights bill comes to a head CNN legal analyst knocks GOP senator over remark on Biden nominee Senate GOP introduces resolution to nix Biden health worker vaccine mandate MORE (R-Tenn.) defeating former Gov. Phil Bredesen (D) after holding a lead in the polls heading into Tuesday.

Democrats are still eyeing potential pick-ups in two western states with seats currently held by Republicans — Arizona and Nevada.

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) had a slight lead over Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Business groups, sensing victory, keep up pressure over tax hikes Kelly raises million in third quarter MORE (R-Ariz.) heading into Tuesday as they battle to succeed retiring Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeCruz to get Nord Stream 2 vote as part of deal on Biden nominees Democrats threaten to play hardball over Cruz's blockade Rubio vows to slow-walk Biden's China, Spain ambassador nominees MORE (R). If Sinema is victorious it would be the first time since 1988 that Arizonans have elected a Democrat to the Senate.

Meanwhile, Democrats held a lead among early voters in Nevada, where Democrats are feeling bullish about their ability to unseat Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerSeven most vulnerable governors facing reelection in 2022 Nevada becomes early Senate battleground Nevada governor Sisolak injured in car accident, released from hospital MORE (R-Nev.), the only Republican senator up for reelection in a state won by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonNo Hillary — the 'Third Way' is the wrong way The dangerous erosion of Democratic Party foundations The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats see victory in a voting rights defeat MORE in 2016.

Updated at 12:54 a.m.