Schumer: Interfering with Mueller would spark 'constitutional crisis'

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerPelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' 3 reasons why Biden is misreading the politics of court packing Cruz blocks amended resolution honoring Ginsburg over language about her dying wish MORE (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday warned that attempts by President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal prosecutor speaks out, says Barr 'has brought shame' on Justice Dept. Former Pence aide: White House staffers discussed Trump refusing to leave office Progressive group buys domain name of Trump's No. 1 Supreme Court pick MORE or a successor to Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsRoy Moore sues Alabama over COVID-19 restrictions GOP set to release controversial Biden report Trump's policies on refugees are as simple as ABCs MORE to interfere in special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's investigation would spark a “constitutional crisis.”  

"I'd say this: Protecting Mueller and his investigation is paramount,” Schumer told reporters during a previously scheduled press conference. “It would create a constitutional crisis if this were a prelude to ending or greatly limiting the Mueller investigation and I hope President Trump and those he listens to will refrain from that.”

Schumer was peppered with questions about the attorney general's exit minutes after Sessions was ousted from the top Justice Department spot. In his resignation letter, Sessions said he was submitting his resignation at Trump's request. 

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Sessions and Trump have had a frayed relationship for months, but firing him sparked immediate concerns by Schumer and other Democrats that it could be an effort to interfere in Mueller's investigation into potential collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign. Trump has lashed out at the probe, decrying it as a “witch hunt.”

Sessions recused himself from the Russia investigation shortly after being sworn in as attorney general, putting Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinDOJ kept investigators from completing probe of Trump ties to Russia: report Five takeaways from final Senate Intel Russia report FBI officials hid copies of Russia probe documents fearing Trump interference: book MORE in charge of the probe.  

Schumer, asked if he had any requirements for a new attorney general nominee, demurred, saying he wanted to view the details of Sessions's dismissal, after being told about the news during the press conference. 

"I'm not going to say much until I read what they said and why. I find the timing very suspect, number one," Schumer said, before adding that any attorney general "should not be able to interfere with the Mueller investigation in any way." 

Democrats are limited in their ability to block Trump's nominees. An attorney general nominee would only need a simple majority in the Senate, meaning Democrats would need to remain united and win over a handful of Republicans to be successful in blocking a nomination. 

Instead, Democrats have for months called for Congress to pass legislation that would protect Mueller if he is fired. But GOP leadership has dismissed the need for such a bill and Democrats are powerless to muscle through the proposal on their own.

Several House Democratic lawmakers quickly renewed their calls to protect Mueller on Wednesday, one day after the party took back the majority in the House.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), who will likely become the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, questioned the timing of Sessions's dismissal. 

"Why is the President making this change and who has authority over Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation? We will be holding people accountable," he said in a tweet

Rep. Lou CorreaJose (Lou) Luis CorreaCriminalization that never should have been: Cannabis Man arrested, charged with threatening to attack Muslims in Germany Gloves come off as Democrats fight for House seat in California MORE (D-Calif.) added that it's "imperative" that whoever Trump picks to succeed Sessions "vows to continue and protect the ongoing investigation."

And Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyA game theorist's advice to President Trump on filling the Supreme Court seat Watchdog confirms State Dept. canceled award for journalist who criticized Trump 3 reasons why Biden is misreading the politics of court packing MORE (D-Mass.) doubled down on calls for the Mueller legislation and raised concerns that Rosenstein could be Trump's next target. 

"Sessions faithfully carried out Trump's extremist agenda. Yet Trump fired him before all the midterm ballots have been counted. If Trump tries to fire Deputy AG Rosenstein next, it will trigger a constitutional crisis. Now more than ever we must protect Special Counsel Mueller," he said in a tweet.