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Schumer: 2020 'doesn't bode well' for GOP

Schumer: 2020 'doesn't bode well' for GOP
© Stefani Reynolds
Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerNew York court worker arrested, accused of threats related to inauguration Schumer: Trump should not be eligible to run for office again McConnnell, McCarthy accept Biden invitation to pre-inauguration church service MORE (D-N.Y.) played defense Wednesday, saying Democrats had a "really good night" and warning Republicans to not feel confident heading into 2020. 
 
"Last night was a really good night for Democrats and what happened last night doesn't bode well for President TrumpDonald TrumpLil Wayne gets 11th hour Trump pardon Trump grants clemency to more than 100 people, including Bannon Trump expected to pardon Bannon: reports MORE and Republicans in 2020 and beyond," Schumer told reporters. 
 
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Schumer pointed to Democrats taking over control of the House — calling the victory "far and away the most significant change" and "great news for America" — as well as highlighting the Democratic gubernatorial wins and state legislatures. 
 
"Republicans lost women, minorities and suburban voters across the country in such margins that it should worry every Republican candidate in 2020 and President Trump," Schumer added. 
 
Though Democrats made gains in the House and were able to unseat Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (R-Nev.), Senate Republicans took down three Democrats: Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillLobbying world Former McCaskill aides launch PAC seeking to thwart Hawley Ex-GOP senator blasts Hawley's challenge to electoral vote count as 'highly destructive attack' MORE (Mo.), Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyBiden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big Harris walks fine line on Barrett as election nears The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by JobsOhio - Showdown: Trump-Biden debate likely to be nasty MORE (Ind.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampHarrison seen as front-runner to take over DNC at crucial moment Biden to tap Vilsack for Agriculture secretary: reports OVERNIGHT ENERGY: EPA guidance may exempt some water polluters from Supreme Court permit mandate | Vilsack's stock rises with Team Biden | Arctic wildfires linked to warming temperatures: NOAA MORE (N.D.). A fourth, Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonGeorgia Senate races shatter spending records Georgia voters flood polls ahead of crucial Senate contests The Hill's Morning Report - Fearing defeat, Trump claims 'illegal' ballots MORE (D-Fla.), is headed toward a recount. 
 
But Schumer countered that Trump's narrative that Tuesday night was a "tremendous success" for Republicans was "delusional."
 
Democrats went into 2018 with a deeply unfavorable map. They had to defend more than two dozen Senate seats, with 10 of those in states Trump won in 2016. 
 
Schumer, on Wednesday, argued that "given the map" Democrats did better than some predicted and added that he believed Democrats were facing better odds in 2020. 
 
"We'll have a very good shot in 2020. ... In 2020 our map is better, in 2022 our map is even better, still," Schumer said. 
 
They face a more favorable map in 2020. Democrats will have to defend 12 seats, while Republicans will be defending 21. Democrats have one senator who is already considered vulnerable — Alabama Sen. Doug Jones (D). 
 
Republicans are expected to have anywhere from a 51 to a 54 seat majority in 2019 depending on the outcomes in Florida, Arizona and the Mississippi runoff election that is scheduled for later this month. 
 
 
If Republicans sweep each of the three races that would mean Democrats would have to pick up four Senate seats and win back the White House or five seats to win control outright.