Schumer: 2020 'doesn't bode well' for GOP

Schumer: 2020 'doesn't bode well' for GOP
© Stefani Reynolds
 
"Last night was a really good night for Democrats and what happened last night doesn't bode well for President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump opens new line of impeachment attack for Democrats Bloomberg to spend 0M on anti-Trump ads in battleground states New witness claims first-hand account of Trump's push for Ukraine probes MORE and Republicans in 2020 and beyond," Schumer told reporters. 
 
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Schumer pointed to Democrats taking over control of the House — calling the victory "far and away the most significant change" and "great news for America" — as well as highlighting the Democratic gubernatorial wins and state legislatures. 
 
"Republicans lost women, minorities and suburban voters across the country in such margins that it should worry every Republican candidate in 2020 and President Trump," Schumer added. 
 
Though Democrats made gains in the House and were able to unseat Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerThis week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary MORE (R-Nev.), Senate Republicans took down three Democrats: Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillMSNBC's McCaskill: Trump used 'his fat thumbs' to try to intimidate Yovanovitch GOP senator rips into Pelosi at Trump rally: 'It must suck to be that dumb' Iranian attacks expose vulnerability of campaign email accounts MORE (Mo.), Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyWatchdog accuses pro-Kavanaugh group of sending illegal robotexts in 2018 Lobbying world Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (Ind.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampThe Hill's Morning Report — Biden steadies in third debate as top tier remains the same Trump wins 60 percent approval in rural areas of key states Pence to push new NAFTA deal in visit to Iowa MORE (N.D.). A fourth, Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonBottom Line Bottom Line Media and candidates should be ashamed that they don't talk about obesity MORE (D-Fla.), is headed toward a recount. 
 
But Schumer countered that Trump's narrative that Tuesday night was a "tremendous success" for Republicans was "delusional."
 
Democrats went into 2018 with a deeply unfavorable map. They had to defend more than two dozen Senate seats, with 10 of those in states Trump won in 2016. 
 
Schumer, on Wednesday, argued that "given the map" Democrats did better than some predicted and added that he believed Democrats were facing better odds in 2020. 
 
"We'll have a very good shot in 2020. ... In 2020 our map is better, in 2022 our map is even better, still," Schumer said. 
 
They face a more favorable map in 2020. Democrats will have to defend 12 seats, while Republicans will be defending 21. Democrats have one senator who is already considered vulnerable — Alabama Sen. Doug Jones (D). 
 
Republicans are expected to have anywhere from a 51 to a 54 seat majority in 2019 depending on the outcomes in Florida, Arizona and the Mississippi runoff election that is scheduled for later this month. 
 
 
If Republicans sweep each of the three races that would mean Democrats would have to pick up four Senate seats and win back the White House or five seats to win control outright.