Schumer reelected as Senate Democratic Leader

Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerBolton book alleges Trump tied Ukraine aid freeze to Biden investigations: NYT Trump legal team offers brisk opening defense of president Impeachment has been a dud for Democrats MORE (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday was named Senate Democratic leader as both parties met to decide their leadership teams for the next Congress.

Schumer was reelected as minority leader by acclamation in the closed-door meeting, according to a source.

Schumer, in a statement, said he was “excited and humbled” to remain in the top Democratic spot.

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“We have a unique opportunity in the new Congress to reach more bipartisan agreements to get things done for families across the country, and we will be ready to work with the president and our Republican colleagues on issues where we agree,” he said.

“However, we will not shy away from standing up to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump denies telling Bolton Ukraine aid was tied to investigations Former senior Senate GOP aide says Republicans should call witnesses Title, release date revealed for Bolton memoir MORE and Congressional Republicans with everything we’ve got when the values we as Americans hold dear are threatened,” he added.

Schumer, who has served in the post since 2017, was not expected to face competition for the caucus’s top spot.

Sen.-elect Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), who pledged during the campaign that she wouldn’t vote for Schumer, attended the leadership election. She declined to comment to reporters when asked if she backed Schumer in the closed-door meeting. Her campaign didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

In a press conference with other Democratic Senate leaders, Schumer said he thought Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonThe most expensive congressional races of the last decade Lobbying world Bottom Line MORE (D-Fla.) had a "good chance" of winning in the Florida recount and touted the Democrats ability to keep or 48 seats in the 2018 midterms despite "facing the worst map that we've ever had."

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"With the Senate map wildly tilted in Republicans favor, we're at worst only one seat worst off than we were when we stood here two years ago and if Bill Nelson wins, which I believe he has a very good chance of doing, we'll be even," Schumer said. "When all the votes are counted in Florida, we could be just where we started at the beginning of the 115th Congress with 48 members, even facing the worst map that we've ever had. We were defending 10 seats that Donald Trump won. Much to the surprise of the prognosticators who thought we'd lose a whole bunch of seats, we didn't."

As the top Democrat in the Senate, Schumer will have to navigate the presidential ambitions of several members of his caucus who are considered potential 2020 contenders and negotiate with Republicans heading into the next election. 

While Republicans were looking a leadership shakeup, the Democratic leadership team is expected to largely stay the same.

One position remains unfilled: the leader of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) next year. Democrats emerged from the meeting without announcing a decision. Sen. Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenDemocrats step up pressure over witnesses after Bolton bombshell Fox's Napolitano: There is 'ample and uncontradicted' evidence supporting Trump's removal from office Sen. Van Hollen releases documents from GAO investigation MORE (D-Md.), who currently chairs the campaign arm, has said he doesn’t want to continue in the position.

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats see Mulvaney as smoking gun witness at Trump trial Trump legal team offers brisk opening defense of president Democrats feel political momentum swinging to them on impeachment MORE (D-Ill.), who is up for reelection in 2020, is staying on as Senate Democratic whip and Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care: Trump becomes first sitting president to attend March for Life | Officials confirm second US case of coronavirus | Trump officials threaten California funding over abortion law Top health officials brief senators on coronavirus as infections spread Administration to give Senate briefing on coronavirus MORE (D-Wash.) will keep her position as assistant Democratic Leader.

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Sens. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowSenate fails to get deal to speed up fight over impeachment rules The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial John Lewis to miss Martin Luther King Jr. Day event MORE (D-Mich.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenPoll: Sanders leads Biden by 9 points in Iowa Poll: Biden leads in Iowa ahead of caucuses The Memo: Impeachment dominates final Iowa sprint MORE (D-Mass.), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerDemocrats worry Trump team will cherry-pick withheld documents during defense Commerce Department withdraws Huawei rule after Pentagon pushback: reports  Hillicon Valley — Presented by Philip Morris International — Bezos phone breach raises fears over Saudi hacking | Amazon seeks to halt Microsoft's work on 'war cloud' | Lawmakers unveil surveillance reform bill MORE (D-Va.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharPoll: Sanders leads Biden by 9 points in Iowa Democrats step up pressure over witnesses after Bolton bombshell The Memo: Impeachment dominates final Iowa sprint MORE (D-Minn.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: Sanders leads Biden by 9 points in Iowa Poll: Biden leads in Iowa ahead of caucuses The Memo: Impeachment dominates final Iowa sprint MORE (I-Vt.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinDemocrats Manchin, Jones signal they're undecided on Trump removal vote Schiff sparks blowback with head on a 'pike' line Schiff closes Dems' impeachment arguments with emotional appeal to remove Trump MORE (D-W.Va.) and Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinSenators ask FDA to crack down on non-dairy milks, cheeses Senate fails to get deal to speed up fight over impeachment rules Lawmakers introduce bill to bolster artificial intelligence, quantum computing MORE (D-Wis.) are also remaining in leadership.

Warren, Klobuchar and Sanders are considered potential 2020 contenders, while Warner is up for re-election.

Manchin and Baldwin were re-elected last week in states Trump won in 2016.

This report was updated at 1:26 p.m.