Schumer reelected as Senate Democratic Leader

Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOn The Money: Trump, Congress reach two-year budget, debt limit deal | What we know | Deal gets pushback from conservatives | Equifax to pay up to 0M in data breach settlement | Warren warns another 'crash' is coming Overnight Defense: Iran's spy claim adds to tensions with US | Trump, lawmakers get two-year budget deal | Trump claims he could win Afghan war in a week Trump, Democrats clinch two-year budget deal MORE (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday was named Senate Democratic leader as both parties met to decide their leadership teams for the next Congress.

Schumer was reelected as minority leader by acclamation in the closed-door meeting, according to a source.

Schumer, in a statement, said he was “excited and humbled” to remain in the top Democratic spot.

“We have a unique opportunity in the new Congress to reach more bipartisan agreements to get things done for families across the country, and we will be ready to work with the president and our Republican colleagues on issues where we agree,” he said.

“However, we will not shy away from standing up to President TrumpDonald John Trump5 things to know about Boris Johnson Conservatives erupt in outrage against budget deal Trump says Omar will help him win Minnesota MORE and Congressional Republicans with everything we’ve got when the values we as Americans hold dear are threatened,” he added.

Schumer, who has served in the post since 2017, was not expected to face competition for the caucus’s top spot.

Sen.-elect Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), who pledged during the campaign that she wouldn’t vote for Schumer, attended the leadership election. She declined to comment to reporters when asked if she backed Schumer in the closed-door meeting. Her campaign didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

In a press conference with other Democratic Senate leaders, Schumer said he thought Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonAl Franken says he 'absolutely' regrets resigning Democrats target Florida Hispanics in 2020 Poll: Six Democrats lead Trump in Florida match-ups MORE (D-Fla.) had a "good chance" of winning in the Florida recount and touted the Democrats ability to keep or 48 seats in the 2018 midterms despite "facing the worst map that we've ever had."

"With the Senate map wildly tilted in Republicans favor, we're at worst only one seat worst off than we were when we stood here two years ago and if Bill Nelson wins, which I believe he has a very good chance of doing, we'll be even," Schumer said. "When all the votes are counted in Florida, we could be just where we started at the beginning of the 115th Congress with 48 members, even facing the worst map that we've ever had. We were defending 10 seats that Donald Trump won. Much to the surprise of the prognosticators who thought we'd lose a whole bunch of seats, we didn't."

As the top Democrat in the Senate, Schumer will have to navigate the presidential ambitions of several members of his caucus who are considered potential 2020 contenders and negotiate with Republicans heading into the next election. 

While Republicans were looking a leadership shakeup, the Democratic leadership team is expected to largely stay the same.

One position remains unfilled: the leader of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) next year. Democrats emerged from the meeting without announcing a decision. Sen. Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenOvernight Energy: USDA expected to lose two-thirds of research staff in move west | EPA hails Trump's work on reducing air pollution | Agency eyes reducing inspections of nuclear reactors USDA expected to lose two-thirds of research staff in move to Kansas City Lawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens MORE (D-Md.), who currently chairs the campaign arm, has said he doesn’t want to continue in the position.

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats pledge to fight Trump detention policy during trip to border Dems open to killing filibuster in next Congress Democrats warm to idea of studying reparations MORE (D-Ill.), who is up for reelection in 2020, is staying on as Senate Democratic whip and Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayFinding a path forward to end surprise medical billing Trump's new labor chief alarms Democrats, unions Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Sanders mounts staunch defense of 'Medicare for All' | Biden, Sanders fight over health care heats up | House votes to repeal ObamaCare 'Cadillac Tax' | Dems want details on fetal tissue research ban MORE (D-Wash.) will keep her position as assistant Democratic Leader.

Sens. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowDemocrats grill USDA official on relocation plans that gut research staff USDA expected to lose two-thirds of research staff in move to Kansas City GOP Senate challenger in Michigan raises .5 million in less than a month MORE (D-Mich.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenPoll: Biden leads 2020 Democratic field by 15 points, followed by Sanders and Warren Warren introduces bill to cancel student loan debt for millions Democrats, advocacy groups urge Pompeo to abolish new 'unalienable rights' commission MORE (D-Mass.), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerEquifax breach settlement sparks criticism Election security to take back seat at Mueller hearing Top Democrats demand security assessment of Trump properties MORE (D-Va.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharDemocrats, advocacy groups urge Pompeo to abolish new 'unalienable rights' commission Equifax breach settlement sparks criticism The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump targets Mueller ahead of testimony MORE (D-Minn.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: Biden leads 2020 Democratic field by 15 points, followed by Sanders and Warren Warren introduces bill to cancel student loan debt for millions Democrats, advocacy groups urge Pompeo to abolish new 'unalienable rights' commission MORE (I-Vt.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Dems open to killing filibuster in next Congress Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (D-W.Va.) and Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinThe Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Judge upholds Trump expansion of non-ObamaCare plans | Williamson says she believes in vaccines | House committee to hold oversight hearing on Juul The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants MORE (D-Wis.) are also remaining in leadership.

Warren, Klobuchar and Sanders are considered potential 2020 contenders, while Warner is up for re-election.

Manchin and Baldwin were re-elected last week in states Trump won in 2016.

This report was updated at 1:26 p.m.