Schumer reelected as Senate Democratic Leader

Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerJewish Democratic congresswoman and veteran blasts Trump's 'disloyalty' comments Schumer says Trump encouraging anti-Semites Saagar Enjeti: Biden's latest blunder; Krystal Ball: Did Schumer blow our chance to beat McConnell? MORE (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday was named Senate Democratic leader as both parties met to decide their leadership teams for the next Congress.

Schumer was reelected as minority leader by acclamation in the closed-door meeting, according to a source.

Schumer, in a statement, said he was “excited and humbled” to remain in the top Democratic spot.

“We have a unique opportunity in the new Congress to reach more bipartisan agreements to get things done for families across the country, and we will be ready to work with the president and our Republican colleagues on issues where we agree,” he said.

“However, we will not shy away from standing up to President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham: America must 'accept the pain that comes in standing up to China' Weld 'thrilled' more Republicans are challenging Trump New data challenges Trump's economic narrative MORE and Congressional Republicans with everything we’ve got when the values we as Americans hold dear are threatened,” he added.

Schumer, who has served in the post since 2017, was not expected to face competition for the caucus’s top spot.

Sen.-elect Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), who pledged during the campaign that she wouldn’t vote for Schumer, attended the leadership election. She declined to comment to reporters when asked if she backed Schumer in the closed-door meeting. Her campaign didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

In a press conference with other Democratic Senate leaders, Schumer said he thought Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonAl Franken says he 'absolutely' regrets resigning Democrats target Florida Hispanics in 2020 Poll: Six Democrats lead Trump in Florida match-ups MORE (D-Fla.) had a "good chance" of winning in the Florida recount and touted the Democrats ability to keep or 48 seats in the 2018 midterms despite "facing the worst map that we've ever had."

"With the Senate map wildly tilted in Republicans favor, we're at worst only one seat worst off than we were when we stood here two years ago and if Bill Nelson wins, which I believe he has a very good chance of doing, we'll be even," Schumer said. "When all the votes are counted in Florida, we could be just where we started at the beginning of the 115th Congress with 48 members, even facing the worst map that we've ever had. We were defending 10 seats that Donald Trump won. Much to the surprise of the prognosticators who thought we'd lose a whole bunch of seats, we didn't."

As the top Democrat in the Senate, Schumer will have to navigate the presidential ambitions of several members of his caucus who are considered potential 2020 contenders and negotiate with Republicans heading into the next election. 

While Republicans were looking a leadership shakeup, the Democratic leadership team is expected to largely stay the same.

One position remains unfilled: the leader of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) next year. Democrats emerged from the meeting without announcing a decision. Sen. Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenSenate Democrats push Trump to permanently shutter migrant detention facility USDA eases relocation timeline as researchers flee agency Fed to launch real-time payments system in 2023 MORE (D-Md.), who currently chairs the campaign arm, has said he doesn’t want to continue in the position.

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSenate Democrats push Trump to permanently shutter migrant detention facility House panel investigating decision to resume federal executions To combat domestic terrorism, Congress must equip law enforcement to fight rise in white supremacist attacks MORE (D-Ill.), who is up for reelection in 2020, is staying on as Senate Democratic whip and Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care: Planned Parenthood to leave federal family planning program absent court action | Democrats demand Trump withdraw rule on transgender health | Cummings, Sanders investigate three drug companies for 'obstructing' probe Democrats demand Trump officials withdraw rule on transgender health The Hill's Morning Report - Progressives, centrists clash in lively Democratic debate MORE (D-Wash.) will keep her position as assistant Democratic Leader.

Sens. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowUSDA cuts payments promised to researchers as agency uproots to Kansas City USDA eases relocation timeline as researchers flee agency USDA office move may have broken law, watchdog says MORE (D-Mich.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump preps conspiracy theory to explain faltering economy Sanders, Warren back major shift to fight drug overdoses Rendell: Biden 'baked in' as Democratic nominee MORE (D-Mass.), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerLawmakers sound alarm on China's disinformation campaign in Hong Kong Facebook users in lawsuit say company failed to warn them of known risks before 2018 breach New intel chief inherits host of challenges MORE (D-Va.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharKlobuchar knocks Trump: 'This negotiating by tweet hasn't been working' Sunday shows preview: Trump ratchets up trade war with China Steyer calls on DNC to expand polling criteria for debates MORE (D-Minn.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump preps conspiracy theory to explain faltering economy Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word' Sanders, Warren back major shift to fight drug overdoses MORE (I-Vt.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinAn ode to Joe Manchin's patriotism on his birthday Trump awards Medal of Freedom to NBA legend Bob Cousy Overnight Energy: Green groups sue Trump over Endangered Species Act changes | Bureau of Land Management retirees fight plan to relocate agency | Wildfires in Amazon rainforest burn at record rate MORE (D-W.Va.) and Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinRecessions happen when presidents overlook key problems Trade wars and the over-valued dollar Overnight Health Care: Senate panel advances drug pricing bill amid GOP blowback | House panel grills Juul executives | Trump gives boost to state drug import plans | Officials say new migrant kids' shelter to remain open but empty MORE (D-Wis.) are also remaining in leadership.

Warren, Klobuchar and Sanders are considered potential 2020 contenders, while Warner is up for re-election.

Manchin and Baldwin were re-elected last week in states Trump won in 2016.

This report was updated at 1:26 p.m.