McConnell: Mueller probe should be allowed to finish

McConnell: Mueller probe should be allowed to finish
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellWe don't need platinum to solve the debt ceiling crisis The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats argue price before policy amid scramble House passes standalone bill to provide B for Israel's Iron Dome MORE (R-Ky.) on Wednesday said special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE’s investigation should be allowed to finish, reiterating what has been a mantra for Senate Republicans this year.

The GOP leader, however, said legislation to protect Mueller from interference by President TrumpDonald TrumpJulian Castro knocks Biden administration over refugee policy Overnight Energy & Environment — League of Conservation Voters — Climate summit chief says US needs to 'show progress' on environment Five takeaways from Arizona's audit results MORE or his new acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker is unnecessary, an argument he has made before. 

“There’s been no indication — as you can imagine, I speak to the president fairly often — no indication the Mueller investigation will not be allowed to finish and it should be allowed to finish,” McConnell said.

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Asked if former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsOvernight Hillicon Valley — Apple issues security update against spyware vulnerability Stanford professors ask DOJ to stop looking for Chinese spies at universities in US Overnight Energy & Environment — Democrats detail clean electricity program MORE’s resignation under pressure might have changed his mind at all about the need for legislation to protect Mueller, McConnell answered with an exasperated “no.”

“We know how the president feels about the Mueller investigation but he’s never said he wants to shut it down. I’ve never heard anybody down there say they want to shut it down. I think it’s in no danger so I don’t think any legislation is necessary,” he said, referring to what he knows about conversations at the White House.

McConnell made his comments on the same day that two colleagues, Sens. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeBiden nominates former Sen. Tom Udall as New Zealand ambassador Biden to nominate Jane Hartley as UK ambassador: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Voting rights will be on '22, '24 ballots MORE (R-Ariz.) and Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsDems punch back over GOP holdup of Biden SBA nominee Biden threatens more sanctions on Ethiopia, Eritrea over Tigray conflict Senate Democrats to Garland: 'It's time to end the federal death penalty' MORE (R-Del.), said they would ask for unanimous consent to vote on the Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act.

The bill was co-authored by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump pushes back on book claims, says he spent 'virtually no time' discussing election with Lee, Graham The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden meets with lawmakers amid domestic agenda panic The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - House Democrats plagued by Biden agenda troubles MORE (R-S.C.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisGOP senators unveil bill designating Taliban as terrorist organization Without major changes, more Americans could be victims of online crime How to fix the semiconductor chip shortage (it's more than manufacturing) MORE (R-N.C.) and Cory BookerCory BookerDemocrats press Schumer on removing Confederate statues from Capitol The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Biden jumps into frenzied Dem spending talks Biden employs flurry of meetings to unite warring factions MORE (D-N.J.), and passed the Judiciary Committee in April.

The legislation codifies Department of Justice regulations mandating that a special counsel can only be fired for good cause and can only be fired by a senior Justice Department official.

It would also create a 10-day review period during which a judge would determine whether a special counsel’s termination was justified.