Gillibrand sidesteps question on possible Clinton 2020 run

Gillibrand sidesteps question on possible Clinton 2020 run
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandNew Hampshire feels overlooked in Democratic presidential race Booker aide sounds alarm about campaign's funding O'Rourke gun confiscation talk alarms Democrats MORE (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday dodged a question about whether she could support former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocrats go all out to court young voters for 2020 Pelosi: Whistleblower complaint 'must be addressed immediately' Election meddling has become the new normal of US diplomacy MORE as a potential 2020 presidential candidate following statements that Gillibrand made last year about former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonTrump sues to block NY prosecutors' subpoena for his tax returns Most voters say there is too much turnover in Trump administration RNC spokeswoman on 2020 GOP primary cancellations: 'This is not abnormal' MORE's affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

"Last year you said that President Clinton should have stepped aside in the Lewinsky affair," CNN's Brianna Keilar said to Gillibrand. "Hillary Clinton recently said she rejected the idea that it was an abuse of power, seemed very out of step with where the national Democratic conversation is. Is that reason for why she should not run?"

"I think every woman should consider whether they want to run, and there's going to be several, which is exciting," Gillibrand said.

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"But what she said, is that what you could stand behind?" Keilar asked. "I'm assuming that is not what you would want to hear your candidate saying."

Gillibrand said, "I think Secretary Clinton will make her own decision based on what she wants to do and what vision she wants to share with America. And I think that there are many women who will look at what President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump's top adviser on Asia to serve as deputy national security adviser United Auto Workers strike against GM poised to head into eighth day Trump doubles down on call to investigate Biden after whistleblower complaint: 'That's the real story' MORE has done to this country, dividing us, tearing us apart ... I think women will feel called to this moment as to whether they need to run whether they need to share their vision for America."

"How important is it for them to reflect the national conversation?" Keilar asked. "To reflect in this 'Time's Up,' 'Me Too' era in a way we didn't see her doing?"

"I think every candidate needs to run on their values," said Gillibrand, who has signaled that she may run for president in 2020.

She has made waves for rebuking individuals, including high-profile Democrats, accused of sexual misconduct.

Gillibrand criticized now-former Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenGOP Senate candidate said Republicans have 'dual loyalties' to Israel The Hill's Morning Report - What is Trump's next move on Iran? The Memo: Times correction gives GOP lifeline in latest Kavanaugh controversy MORE (D-Minn.) as well as former President Clinton.

Hillary Clinton, the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee, has defended her husband, saying last month that it was not an abuse of power for her husband to have had an affair with a White House intern.