Dems wonder if Sherrod Brown could be their magic man

Democrats say Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownHillicon Valley: Commerce extends Huawei waiver | Senate Dems unveil privacy bill priorities | House funding measure extends surveillance program | Trump to tour Apple factory | GOP bill would restrict US data going to China Senate Democrats unveil priorities for federal privacy bill On The Money: Trump asks Supreme Court to block Dem subpoena for financial records | Kudlow 'very optimistic' for new NAFTA deal | House passes Ex-Im Bank bill opposed by Trump, McConnell MORE (D-Ohio) is a potential 2020 candidate who could thread the needle and unite a party divided by people debating whether it’s better to move to the left or the center to win back the White House.

Brown is the kind of politician who can appeal to both sides in that debate, which has defined the 2020 conversation in Democratic circles so far.

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He’s a progressive who has embraced progressive social views on gay rights and abortion, who just won reelection in Ohio — which increasingly is seen as Trump territory.

Brown might be best known for his liberal economic views, including support for a higher minimum wage and opposition to the Trump tax law. But on trade, he’s long espoused positions similar to President TrumpDonald John TrumpWatergate prosecutor says that Sondland testimony was 'tipping point' for Trump In private moment with Trump, Justice Kennedy pushed for Kavanaugh Supreme Court nomination: book Obama: 'Everybody needs to chill out' about differences between 2020 candidates MORE’s, which have been popular with his political base.

He’s got the image of a somewhat rumpled local politician who fits in well with the industrial Midwest, perhaps the key geographic area in the next presidential race.

If a Democratic candidate can take back Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, the three states central to Trump’s victory in 2016, they’d win back the White House assuming they carry the other states won by Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocratic strategist laments 'low bar' for Biden debate performance Wasserman Schultz makes bid for House Appropriations Committee gavel Trump to hold campaign rally in Pennsylvania next month MORE

“Those states will be critical,” said Sen. Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedSenators want Air Force probe into allegations military housing provider faked records Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pentagon watchdog says Syria withdrawal hurt ISIS fight | Vindman testifies on third day of public hearings | Lawmakers to wrap up defense bill talks this week Lawmakers expect to finish defense policy bill negotiations this week MORE (D-R.I.), who said Brown’s win was a shot in the arm that should be credited to the candidate’s specific brand of politics.

“Sherrod’s victory shows a Democrat, a progressive Democrat did very, very well,” he said. “But it’s a function of more than campaign platform. It’s also the person.” 

When it comes to taking on Trump, a candidate like Brown could be the solution, Democrats say. 

“In many respects he provides the perfect antidote to President Trump,” said Democratic strategist Jim Manley, who got to know Brown when he served in the Senate for then-Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidHarry Reid: Early voting states Iowa, New Hampshire 'not representative of the country anymore' The Memo: Democrats confront prospect of long primary Bottom Line MORE (D-Nev.).

“He’s a proud progressive but he doesn’t utilize the harsh rhetoric that some on the left use,” Manley said. “That’s the difference.”

In an interview with The New York Times this week, Brown acknowledged that he is “thinking” about running for president. He told the newspaper that he and his wife, the journalist Connie Schultz, “have been overwhelmed by the number of people that have come forward and said ‘You’ve got to run. You have the right message. You come from the right state.’ ” 

Those who know Brown well say he was never interested in a White House bid.

One source, however, said the senator was “slightly disappointed” he wasn’t selected by Clinton as her running mate in 2016.

“He thought he could have added something to the ticket,” the source said. “I think he was right.” 

Brown could have a future as a vice presidential candidate again, though there would surely be fears in Democratic circles that it would risk losing a seat to Republicans in the closely divided Senate. The incoming governor of Ohio, Mike DeWine, is a Republican.

More recently, particularly after the controversies surrounding the Trump presidency, Brown began to give a White House run more thought, associates say. 

“His focus was always on winning reelection but he was definitely giving it a lot of thought at the same time, and why not?” said one Democrat who discussed the topic with the senator. “I think he saw how Trump won and that’s his constituency. He gets them and they get him.”

At a time when Democrats are struggling to rally around a unifying message for the party, Democrats keep pointing to Brown’s economic vision, one they say worked well in his reelection bid. 

Ben LaBolt, the Democratic strategist and longtime Obama spokesman who worked for Brown, said that message can easily be applied to a 2020 campaign.  

“He has a vision for how to make sure good paying jobs that allow you to support your family will be created not just on the coasts but throughout the country,” LaBolt said.

To that point, Sen. Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichSenate reviews Interior, FERC nominees criticized on ethics This week: House to vote on Turkey sanctions bill Hillicon Valley: Facebook launches 'News Tab' | Senate passes bill to take on 'deepfakes' | Schumer outlines vision for electric cars MORE (D-N.M.) said Brown is an attractive candidate because of “his strength in rural communities” and his ability to connect with working-class voters. 

“The dignity of work is really fundamental to the DNA of the Democratic Party and when we consistently communicate that, we have a much broader appeal than when we don’t,” Heinrich said. “That’s Sherrod to a T.” 

If he does choose to run, Brown could be a rival to former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Watergate prosecutor says that Sondland testimony was 'tipping point' for Trump Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Deal on defense bill proves elusive | Hill, Holmes offer damaging testimony | Trump vows to block Navy from ousting officer from SEALs MORE if he also enters the race.

“Sherrod and Joe share a very similar lane,” said David B. Cohen, the assistant director of the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron, adding that it would probably weigh on his decision if Biden entered the race. 

Like Biden, Brown is “not someone who is a bullet-point politician,” Cohen said. “He doesn’t poll before he opens his mouth. He has a plain way of speak, he’s consistent and people respect him for that.” 

Brown would also likely face a number of colleagues if he chooses to run for the White House.

Among the senators thought to be considering bids are fellow Democratic Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Warren speech in Georgia interrupted by pro-charter school protesters Hillicon Valley: Senators ask Trump to halt Huawei licenses | Warren criticizes Zuckerberg over secret dinner with Trump | Senior DHS cyber official to leave | Dems offer bill on Libra oversight MORE (Mass.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBooker hits fundraising threshold for December debate after surge of post-debate donations Bicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers The Hill's Morning Report - Sondland stuns; Dems pull punches in fifth debate MORE (N.J.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandBooker hits fundraising threshold for December debate after surge of post-debate donations Maloney primary challenger calls on her to return, donate previous campaign donations from Trump Senate confirms controversial circuit court nominee MORE (N.Y.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance On The Money: Trump signs short-term spending bill to avoid shutdown | Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 | California high court strikes down law targeting Trump tax returns Democratic strategist laments 'low bar' for Biden debate performance MORE (Calif.), in addition to Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersKamala Harris receives new Iowa endorsements after debate performance Wasserman Schultz makes bid for House Appropriations Committee gavel Overnight Health Care: Crunch time for Congress on surprise medical bills | CDC confirms 47 vaping-related deaths | Massachusetts passes flavored tobacco, vaping products ban MORE (I-Vt.).  

Asked this week if Brown would be a strong presidential candidate, Harris replied, “I love Sherrod. I think he’s fantastic.”

“I think Sherrod will be good at whatever he chooses to do,” Harris said. 

She made sure to highlight that Brown invited her to campaign with him in Ohio. 

“We traveled up and down Ohio together and I’ve seen him in his state and he is well respected. He is a strong voice for labor and organized labor,” she added. “I think his voice is a very important voice in our caucus and in our country.”