FEATURED:

Dems wonder if Sherrod Brown could be their magic man

Democrats say Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownDeval Patrick announces he will not run for president in 2020, citing 'cruelty of election process' The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — Congress to act soon to avoid shutdown On The Money: Trump touts China actions day after stock slide | China 'confident' on new trade deal | GM chief meets lawmakers to calm anger over cuts | Huawei CFO arrested MORE (D-Ohio) is a potential 2020 candidate who could thread the needle and unite a party divided by people debating whether it’s better to move to the left or the center to win back the White House.

Brown is the kind of politician who can appeal to both sides in that debate, which has defined the 2020 conversation in Democratic circles so far.

ADVERTISEMENT

He’s a progressive who has embraced progressive social views on gay rights and abortion, who just won reelection in Ohio — which increasingly is seen as Trump territory.

Brown might be best known for his liberal economic views, including support for a higher minimum wage and opposition to the Trump tax law. But on trade, he’s long espoused positions similar to President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoaquín Castro: Trump would be 'in court right now' if he weren't the president or 'privileged' Trump flubs speech location at criminal justice conference Comey reveals new details on Russia probe during House testimony MORE’s, which have been popular with his political base.

He’s got the image of a somewhat rumpled local politician who fits in well with the industrial Midwest, perhaps the key geographic area in the next presidential race.

If a Democratic candidate can take back Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, the three states central to Trump’s victory in 2016, they’d win back the White House assuming they carry the other states won by Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonComey reveals new details on Russia probe during House testimony Clinton among VIPS attending pre-wedding celebrations for daughter of India’s richest man Comey’s confession: dossier not verified before, or after, FISA warrant MORE

“Those states will be critical,” said Sen. Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedYemen resolution picks up crucial support in Senate Senate to get briefing on Saudi Arabia that could determine sanctions Dem senator: Trump's Saudi statement 'stunning window' into his 'autocratic tendencies' MORE (D-R.I.), who said Brown’s win was a shot in the arm that should be credited to the candidate’s specific brand of politics.

“Sherrod’s victory shows a Democrat, a progressive Democrat did very, very well,” he said. “But it’s a function of more than campaign platform. It’s also the person.” 

When it comes to taking on Trump, a candidate like Brown could be the solution, Democrats say. 

“In many respects he provides the perfect antidote to President Trump,” said Democratic strategist Jim Manley, who got to know Brown when he served in the Senate for then-Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidManchin’s likely senior role on key energy panel rankles progressives Water wars won’t be won on a battlefield Poll finds most Americans and most women don’t want Pelosi as Speaker MORE (D-Nev.).

“He’s a proud progressive but he doesn’t utilize the harsh rhetoric that some on the left use,” Manley said. “That’s the difference.”

In an interview with The New York Times this week, Brown acknowledged that he is “thinking” about running for president. He told the newspaper that he and his wife, the journalist Connie Schultz, “have been overwhelmed by the number of people that have come forward and said ‘You’ve got to run. You have the right message. You come from the right state.’ ” 

Those who know Brown well say he was never interested in a White House bid.

One source, however, said the senator was “slightly disappointed” he wasn’t selected by Clinton as her running mate in 2016.

“He thought he could have added something to the ticket,” the source said. “I think he was right.” 

Brown could have a future as a vice presidential candidate again, though there would surely be fears in Democratic circles that it would risk losing a seat to Republicans in the closely divided Senate. The incoming governor of Ohio, Mike DeWine, is a Republican.

More recently, particularly after the controversies surrounding the Trump presidency, Brown began to give a White House run more thought, associates say. 

“His focus was always on winning reelection but he was definitely giving it a lot of thought at the same time, and why not?” said one Democrat who discussed the topic with the senator. “I think he saw how Trump won and that’s his constituency. He gets them and they get him.”

At a time when Democrats are struggling to rally around a unifying message for the party, Democrats keep pointing to Brown’s economic vision, one they say worked well in his reelection bid. 

Ben LaBolt, the Democratic strategist and longtime Obama spokesman who worked for Brown, said that message can easily be applied to a 2020 campaign.  

“He has a vision for how to make sure good paying jobs that allow you to support your family will be created not just on the coasts but throughout the country,” LaBolt said.

To that point, Sen. Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichManchin’s likely senior role on key energy panel rankles progressives Senate panel advances Trump’s energy nominee despite Dem objections Dems wonder if Sherrod Brown could be their magic man MORE (D-N.M.) said Brown is an attractive candidate because of “his strength in rural communities” and his ability to connect with working-class voters. 

“The dignity of work is really fundamental to the DNA of the Democratic Party and when we consistently communicate that, we have a much broader appeal than when we don’t,” Heinrich said. “That’s Sherrod to a T.” 

If he does choose to run, Brown could be a rival to former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates — Trump taps William Barr as new AG | Nauert picked to replace Haley at UN | Washington waits for bombshell Mueller filing Warren fell for ‘Trump trap’ with DNA test, says progressive Major Obama 2008 fundraiser throws support behind Beto 2020: ‘Time to pass the torch’ MORE if he also enters the race.

“Sherrod and Joe share a very similar lane,” said David B. Cohen, the assistant director of the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron, adding that it would probably weigh on his decision if Biden entered the race. 

Like Biden, Brown is “not someone who is a bullet-point politician,” Cohen said. “He doesn’t poll before he opens his mouth. He has a plain way of speak, he’s consistent and people respect him for that.” 

Brown would also likely face a number of colleagues if he chooses to run for the White House.

Among the senators thought to be considering bids are fellow Democratic Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenDemocrats wise to proceed cautiously on immigration Strategist behind Warren's political rise to meet with O'Rourke: report Warren fell for ‘Trump trap’ with DNA test, says progressive MORE (Mass.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSanders to Colbert: 'You will be my vice presidential candidate!' Sanders: Trump said midterms were about him, and he lost Boston Globe pans Warren as ‘divisive figure’ ahead of potential 2020 run MORE (N.J.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandNRA's Loesch: Gillibrand’s 'future Is female’ tweet 'is pretty sexist' Would-be 2020 Dem candidates head for the exits Rubio mocks Gillibrand tweet saying the future is ‘female’ and ‘intersectional’ MORE (N.Y.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisWarren fell for ‘Trump trap’ with DNA test, says progressive Swalwell: Open to Swalwell-Biden or Biden-Swalwell ticket Boston Globe pans Warren as ‘divisive figure’ ahead of potential 2020 run MORE (Calif.), in addition to Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersChildren's singer Raffi on criticizing Trump: 'You have to fight fascism with everything you’ve got' Sanders to Colbert: 'You will be my vice presidential candidate!' Sanders: Trump said midterms were about him, and he lost MORE (I-Vt.).  

Asked this week if Brown would be a strong presidential candidate, Harris replied, “I love Sherrod. I think he’s fantastic.”

“I think Sherrod will be good at whatever he chooses to do,” Harris said. 

She made sure to highlight that Brown invited her to campaign with him in Ohio. 

“We traveled up and down Ohio together and I’ve seen him in his state and he is well respected. He is a strong voice for labor and organized labor,” she added. “I think his voice is a very important voice in our caucus and in our country.”