Flake to ask again for vote on Mueller protection bill next week

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeCheney clashes with Trump Sessions-Tuberville Senate runoff heats up in Alabama GOP lawmakers stick to Trump amid new criticism MORE (R-Ariz.) said Thursday that he is planning to go back to the Senate floor next week to ask for a vote on legislation protecting special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE, after being blocked twice this month.

"We have a bill that's passed the committee with bipartisan support. There have been suggestions that I should accept a sense of the Senate, that sends the wrong message to the president. This is the message that needs to be sent to the president—passage of this bill," Flake said.

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He added that passing the legislation would show President TrumpDonald John TrumpOklahoma City Thunder players kneel during anthem despite threat from GOP state lawmaker Microsoft moving forward with talks to buy TikTok after conversation with Trump Controversial Trump nominee placed in senior role after nomination hearing canceled MORE that "the Senate won't have his back if he fires Mueller or if he tries to interfere in that investigation."

Flake's plan to go back to the Senate floor to ask for consent to schedule a vote on the legislation comes after his request was blocked, for a second time this month, on Wednesday by Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeTea Party rises up against McConnell's trillion relief plan Hillicon Valley: Twitter bans thousands of QAnon accounts | Bipartisan support grows for election funds in Senate stimulus bill | Senate committee advances bill to ban TikTok from federal devices Senators demand answers on expired surveillance programs MORE (R-Utah), who argued the bill was unconstitutional.

Senate GOP leadership have been searching for a way to defuse the fight over the special counsel legislation, which is complicating their ability to confirm President Trump’s judicial nominees.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynFrustration builds as negotiators struggle to reach COVID-19 deal Chamber of Commerce endorses Ernst for reelection Mini-exodus of Trump officials from Commerce to lobby on semiconductors MORE (R-Texas) told The Hill on Wednesday evening that they have whipped the legislation but hadn't figured out a way to end the stalemate, noting that senators within the Republican caucus have objections to the Mueller protection legislation.

“I think we haven’t really figured out how to deal with that,” Cornyn said.

With Republicans holding a narrow majority, Flake's pledge to vote against any judicial nominees until he gets a vote has placed a strain on Republicans ability to confirm judges, which is a top priority for Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP scrambles to fend off Kobach in Kansas primary Meadows: Election will be held on November third Don't let Trump distract us from the real threat of his presidency MORE (R-Ky.).

Vice President Pence had to break two ties on two different judicial nominations this week after Flake sided with every Democratic senator in opposing them on procedural hurdles.

And Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyRepublicans dismiss Trump proposal to delay election Timeline for GOP's Obama probe report slips as chairman eyes subpoenas GOP hunts for 'Plan B' as coronavirus talks hit wall MORE (R-Iowa), the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, cancelled a business meeting scheduled for Thursday where nearly two dozen nominees on the agenda for a vote because they failed to get Flake to back down.

Flake said GOP leaders were "hoping to resolve" the stalemate on judges but the only solution, in his view, was a vote on the Mueller bill on the Senate floor.

"We need to pass the bill. Whether it passes the House or not I'm not in control of that, but we need to pass it out of the Senate," he said, adding separately that "I think it's important enough, particularly after the firing of the attorney general, to use the leverage I have."

Republican leadership could wait out Flake, who is retiring at the end of the year. Kicking the nominees until next year would force the White House to renominate them in January, an untimely but not fatal setback.

Flake said he hoped that they could get agreement that would allow the Republican majority to move additional judges but his "priority" is getting a vote on the special counsel bill.

"There are a number of judges, one of whom is from Arizona who is non-controversial, there are a number of these that have bipartisan support, I hope that we can move them through. But the priority has to be this bill to protect the special counsel," he said.

The Senate Judiciary Committee has passed legislation that would protect Mueller, or any other special counsel, in the event he is fired, but the bill has stalled amid opposition from GOP leadership.

The bill would codify Justice Department regulations that say only a senior department official could fire Mueller or another special counsel.

It would give a special counsel an "expedited review" of their firing. If a court determines that it wasn't for "good cause," the special counsel would be reinstated.