Rubio mocks Gillibrand tweet saying the future is ‘female’ and ‘intersectional’

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids — Trump issues order to bring transparency to health care prices | Fight over billions in ObamaCare payments heads to Supreme Court Ex-Obama counterterrorism official: Huawei could pose security threat to international intelligence community The Memo: All eyes on faltering Biden ahead of first debate MORE (R-Fla.) mocked a tweet from Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandRules for first Democratic primary debates announced Juan Williams: Warren on the rise 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the first Democratic showdown MORE (D-N.Y.) in which she said the future is "female" and "intersectional."

"Our future is: AMERICAN," Rubio tweeted. "An identity based not on gender,race,ethnicity or religion. But on the powerful truth that all people are created equal with a God given right to life, liberty & the pursuit of happiness."

Rubio's tweet mimicked the format of Gillibrand's post about America's future.

"Our future is: Female, Intersectional, Powered by our belief in one another," she wrote. "And we’re just getting started."

Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpDemocrats seek to ban federal spending at Trump businesses Republicans, Trump Jr. signal support for embattled West Virginia governor The Hill's Morning Report — US strikes approved against Iran pulled back MORE also criticized Gillibrand’s tweet, asking “When is it appropriate to let my boys (9, 7 and 6 years old) that there's no future for them?”

“Not sure this is a winning platform but you be you.” 

A record number of women were elected to Congress during the November midterms. Additionally, Sen.-elect Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) will become the first openly bisexual senator, while Reps.-elect Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarPelosi, Democratic leaders seek to quell liberal revolt over border bill Sanders unveils student debt plan amid rivalry with Warren Sanders proposes canceling .6 trillion in US student debt MORE (D-Minn.) and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) became the first Muslim women elected to Congress.