Rubio mocks Gillibrand tweet saying the future is ‘female’ and ‘intersectional’

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTrump putting TikTok ban on hold for 45 days: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Biden VP possible next week; Meadows says relief talks 'miles apart' Pompeo: Trump taking action on Chinese software firms 'in coming days' MORE (R-Fla.) mocked a tweet from Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandBiden should pick the best person for the job — not the best woman Overnight Defense: Guardsman to testify Lafayette Square clearing was 'unprovoked escalation' | Dems push for controversial Pentagon nominee to withdraw | Watchdog says Pentagon not considering climate change risks to contractors Democrats urge controversial Pentagon policy nominee to withdraw MORE (D-N.Y.) in which she said the future is "female" and "intersectional."

"Our future is: AMERICAN," Rubio tweeted. "An identity based not on gender,race,ethnicity or religion. But on the powerful truth that all people are created equal with a God given right to life, liberty & the pursuit of happiness."

Rubio's tweet mimicked the format of Gillibrand's post about America's future.

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"Our future is: Female, Intersectional, Powered by our belief in one another," she wrote. "And we’re just getting started."

Donald Trump Jr.Don John TrumpTwitter limits Donald Trump Jr.'s account after sharing coronavirus disinformation South Dakota governor flew with Trump on Air Force One after being exposed to coronavirus: report Gianforte halts in-person campaigning after wife, running mate attend event with Guilfoyle MORE also criticized Gillibrand’s tweet, asking “When is it appropriate to let my boys (9, 7 and 6 years old) that there's no future for them?”

“Not sure this is a winning platform but you be you.” 

A record number of women were elected to Congress during the November midterms. Additionally, Sen.-elect Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) will become the first openly bisexual senator, while Reps.-elect Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarTrump campaign rolls out TV spots in early voting states after advertising pause Trump adviser Jason Miller: Biden running mate pick 'his political living will' 'Squad' member Rashida Tlaib faces strong primary challenger MORE (D-Minn.) and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) became the first Muslim women elected to Congress.