Rubio mocks Gillibrand tweet saying the future is ‘female’ and ‘intersectional’

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTikTok's leader to meet with lawmakers next week GOP senators unveil bill to expand 'opportunity zone' reporting requirements Three dead, several injured in Pensacola naval station shooting MORE (R-Fla.) mocked a tweet from Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandWhite House, Congress near deal to give 12 weeks paid parental leave to all federal workers Bloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money' Harris posts video asking baby if she'll run for president one day MORE (D-N.Y.) in which she said the future is "female" and "intersectional."

"Our future is: AMERICAN," Rubio tweeted. "An identity based not on gender,race,ethnicity or religion. But on the powerful truth that all people are created equal with a God given right to life, liberty & the pursuit of happiness."

Rubio's tweet mimicked the format of Gillibrand's post about America's future.

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"Our future is: Female, Intersectional, Powered by our belief in one another," she wrote. "And we’re just getting started."

Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpWhite House calls Democratic witness's mentioning of president's youngest son 'classless' Lawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing Top Democrats knock Trump on World AIDS Day MORE also criticized Gillibrand’s tweet, asking “When is it appropriate to let my boys (9, 7 and 6 years old) that there's no future for them?”

“Not sure this is a winning platform but you be you.” 

A record number of women were elected to Congress during the November midterms. Additionally, Sen.-elect Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) will become the first openly bisexual senator, while Reps.-elect Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarHouse approves two-state resolution in implicit rebuke of Trump Al Green calls for including Trump's 'racism' in impeachment articles Republicans disavow GOP candidate who said 'we should hang' Omar MORE (D-Minn.) and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) became the first Muslim women elected to Congress.