Rubio mocks Gillibrand tweet saying the future is ‘female’ and ‘intersectional’

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTrump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy Trump crosses new line with Omar, Tlaib, Israel move MORE (R-Fla.) mocked a tweet from Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump on defense over economic jitters F-bombs away: Why lawmakers are cursing now more than ever White House offers reassurances amid recession fears as 2020 candidates sound alarm MORE (D-N.Y.) in which she said the future is "female" and "intersectional."

"Our future is: AMERICAN," Rubio tweeted. "An identity based not on gender,race,ethnicity or religion. But on the powerful truth that all people are created equal with a God given right to life, liberty & the pursuit of happiness."

Rubio's tweet mimicked the format of Gillibrand's post about America's future.

"Our future is: Female, Intersectional, Powered by our belief in one another," she wrote. "And we’re just getting started."

Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpDick Cheney to attend fundraiser supporting Trump reelection: report House chairman warns foreign governments to 'cease and desist' spending money at Trump properties Chris Cuomo: 'I should be better than the guys baiting me' MORE also criticized Gillibrand’s tweet, asking “When is it appropriate to let my boys (9, 7 and 6 years old) that there's no future for them?”

“Not sure this is a winning platform but you be you.” 

A record number of women were elected to Congress during the November midterms. Additionally, Sen.-elect Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) will become the first openly bisexual senator, while Reps.-elect Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarWorld Jewish Congress condemns Tlaib for suggesting boycott of Bill Maher's show A lesson of the Trump, Tlaib, Omar, Netanyahu affair Tlaib suggests boycotting Maher show after he calls anti-Israel boycott movement 'bulls--- purity test' MORE (D-Minn.) and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) became the first Muslim women elected to Congress.