GOP senators introduce bill to give Trump $25 billion for border wall

Republican senators have introduced legislation to fully fund President TrumpDonald John TrumpMcCabe says he was fired because he 'opened a case against' Trump McCabe: Trump said 'I don't care, I believe Putin' when confronted with US intel on North Korea McCabe: Trump talked to me about his election victory during 'bizarre' job interview MORE's request of $25 billion for the U.S.-Mexico border wall. 

"The WALL Act would fully fund the border wall by closing existing loopholes that provide illegal immigrants with federal benefits and tax credits, without affecting the benefits and tax credits used by Americans," Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzEl Chapo's lawyer fires back at Cruz: 'Ludicrous' to suggest drug lord will pay for wall Democrats have a chance of beating Trump with Julian Castro on the 2020 ticket Poll shows competitive matchup if O’Rourke ran for Senate again MORE (R-Texas) said in a statement on Thursday. 

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To pay for the border wall, the Republicans propose to crack down on benefits for undocumented immigrants, including requiring that parents have a Social Security number to claim refundable tax credits, requiring any welfare applicants to prove they are a citizen and increasing minimum fines on individuals who cross the border illegally or overstay visas. 

"If you want to receive food stamps and other benefits, then you should prove your citizenship. If you cross the border illegally or overstay your visit to this country, then you should pay a stiff penalty," Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) added.

In addition to Kennedy and Cruz, the bill was introduced by Sens. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeOn The Money: Trump to sign border deal, declare emergency to build wall | Senate passes funding bill, House to follow | Dems promise challenge to emergency declaration Trump to sign border deal, declare national emergency Foreign Affairs chairman: US military intervention in Venezuela 'not an option' MORE (R-Okla.) and Mike RoundsMarion (Mike) Michael RoundsGOP senator: Trump thinks funding deal is 'thin gruel' Lawmakers put Pentagon's cyber in their sights Endorsing Trump isn’t the easiest decision for some Republicans MORE (R-S.D.). 

The legislation, which is unlikely to go anywhere, comes amid a stalled out fight over the border. Congress has until the end of the day Friday to prevent a partial government shutdown.

The House’s bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security would give Trump $5 billion for the border, while the Senate’s bill would provide $1.6 billion.