GOP senators introduce bill to give Trump $25 billion for border wall

Republican senators have introduced legislation to fully fund President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governor Arkansas governor says it's 'disappointing' vaccinations have become 'political' Watch live: Trump attends rally in Phoenix MORE's request of $25 billion for the U.S.-Mexico border wall. 

"The WALL Act would fully fund the border wall by closing existing loopholes that provide illegal immigrants with federal benefits and tax credits, without affecting the benefits and tax credits used by Americans," Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia next week Here's evidence the Senate confirmation process is broken MORE (R-Texas) said in a statement on Thursday. 

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To pay for the border wall, the Republicans propose to crack down on benefits for undocumented immigrants, including requiring that parents have a Social Security number to claim refundable tax credits, requiring any welfare applicants to prove they are a citizen and increasing minimum fines on individuals who cross the border illegally or overstay visas. 

"If you want to receive food stamps and other benefits, then you should prove your citizenship. If you cross the border illegally or overstay your visit to this country, then you should pay a stiff penalty," Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) added.

In addition to Kennedy and Cruz, the bill was introduced by Sens. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeGillibrand expects vote on military justice bill in fall The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Biden backs Cuban protesters, assails 'authoritarian regime' Trump getting tougher for Senate GOP to ignore MORE (R-Okla.) and Mike RoundsMike RoundsBipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor Schumer sets up key vote on bipartisan deal Graham: Bipartisan infrastructure pay-fors are insufficient MORE (R-S.D.). 

The legislation, which is unlikely to go anywhere, comes amid a stalled out fight over the border. Congress has until the end of the day Friday to prevent a partial government shutdown.

The House’s bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security would give Trump $5 billion for the border, while the Senate’s bill would provide $1.6 billion.