McCaskill: 'Too many embarrassing uncles' in the Senate

Outgoing Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillLobbying world Dem candidate has Hawley served subpoena at CPAC Annual scorecard ranks GOP environmental efforts far below Dems in 2018 MORE (D-Mo.) jabbed at her colleagues in her final Senate floor speech on Thursday, arguing that the Senate was filled with "too many embarrassing uncles."

In her speech, McCaskill knocked "dysfunction" in the Senate and said senators were afraid of making tough votes.

ADVERTISEMENT

"Peter Morgan, an author, wrote that no family is complete without an embarrassing uncle," McCaskill said Thursday. "We have too many embarrassing uncles in the United States Senate. Lots of embarrassing stuff."

"The United States Senate is no longer the world's greatest deliberative body," McCaskill continued in her farewell address to the chamber. "And everybody needs to quit saying it, until we recover from this period of polarization and the fear of the political consequences of tough votes."

McCaskill delivered her farewell speech Thursday alongside other departing U.S. senators including Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeSchumer to introduce bill naming Senate office building after McCain amid Trump uproar Trump keeps tight grip on GOP McSally to back Trump on emergency declaration MORE (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonEx-House Intel chair: Intel panel is wrong forum to investigate Trump's finances The Hill's Morning Report - Trump budget reignites border security fight 2020 party politics in Puerto Rico MORE (D-Fla.).

The two-term Missouri Democrat was denied a third term in November by Sen.-elect Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyGOP steps up attack over tech bias claims Hillicon Valley: Nunes sues Twitter for 0 million | Trump links tech giants to 'Radical Left Democrats' | Facebook settles suits over ad discrimination | Dems want answers over spread of New Zealand shooting video Trio of NFL players intern on Capitol Hill as part of league program MORE (R), previously the state's attorney general, in a crucial pickup for Republicans who saw a net gain of two seats in the Senate during the midterm elections.

Hawley won the seat by 6 points after President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump mocks wind power: 'When the wind doesn't blow, just turn off the television' Pentagon investigator probing whether acting chief boosted former employer Boeing Trump blasts McCain, bemoans not getting 'thank you' for funeral MORE previously won Missouri by roughly 18 points in the 2016 election.