McCaskill: 'Too many embarrassing uncles' in the Senate

Outgoing Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillEx-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity Ocasio-Cortez blasts NYT editor for suggesting Tlaib, Omar aren't representative of Midwest Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (D-Mo.) jabbed at her colleagues in her final Senate floor speech on Thursday, arguing that the Senate was filled with "too many embarrassing uncles."

In her speech, McCaskill knocked "dysfunction" in the Senate and said senators were afraid of making tough votes.

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"Peter Morgan, an author, wrote that no family is complete without an embarrassing uncle," McCaskill said Thursday. "We have too many embarrassing uncles in the United States Senate. Lots of embarrassing stuff."

"The United States Senate is no longer the world's greatest deliberative body," McCaskill continued in her farewell address to the chamber. "And everybody needs to quit saying it, until we recover from this period of polarization and the fear of the political consequences of tough votes."

McCaskill delivered her farewell speech Thursday alongside other departing U.S. senators including Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeArpaio considering running for former sheriff job after Trump pardon Overnight Energy: Warren edges past Sanders in poll of climate-focused voters | Carbon tax shows new signs of life | Greens fuming at Trump plans for development at Bears Ears monument Carbon tax shows new signs of life in Congress MORE (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonAl Franken says he 'absolutely' regrets resigning Democrats target Florida Hispanics in 2020 Poll: Six Democrats lead Trump in Florida match-ups MORE (D-Fla.).

The two-term Missouri Democrat was denied a third term in November by Sen.-elect Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyGovernment regulation of social media would kill the internet — and free speech Juan Williams: We need a backlash against Big Tech Twitter unlocks McConnell's campaign account after GOP boycott MORE (R), previously the state's attorney general, in a crucial pickup for Republicans who saw a net gain of two seats in the Senate during the midterm elections.

Hawley won the seat by 6 points after President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE previously won Missouri by roughly 18 points in the 2016 election.