McCaskill: 'Too many embarrassing uncles' in the Senate

Outgoing Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillDemocratic-linked group runs ads in Kansas GOP Senate primary Trump mocked for low attendance at rally Missouri county issues travel advisory for Lake of the Ozarks after Memorial Day parties MORE (D-Mo.) jabbed at her colleagues in her final Senate floor speech on Thursday, arguing that the Senate was filled with "too many embarrassing uncles."

In her speech, McCaskill knocked "dysfunction" in the Senate and said senators were afraid of making tough votes.

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"Peter Morgan, an author, wrote that no family is complete without an embarrassing uncle," McCaskill said Thursday. "We have too many embarrassing uncles in the United States Senate. Lots of embarrassing stuff."

"The United States Senate is no longer the world's greatest deliberative body," McCaskill continued in her farewell address to the chamber. "And everybody needs to quit saying it, until we recover from this period of polarization and the fear of the political consequences of tough votes."

McCaskill delivered her farewell speech Thursday alongside other departing U.S. senators including Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeCheney clashes with Trump Sessions-Tuberville Senate runoff heats up in Alabama GOP lawmakers stick to Trump amid new criticism MORE (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William Nelson Trump, facing trouble in Florida, goes all in NASA names DC headquarters after agency's first Black female engineer Mary W. Jackson NASA, SpaceX and the private-public partnership that caused the flight of the Crew Dragon MORE (D-Fla.).

The two-term Missouri Democrat was denied a third term in November by Sen.-elect Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyHillicon Valley: Facebook bans ads from pro-Trump PAC | Uber reports big drop in revenue | US offers M reward for election interference info Senate passes legislation to ban TikTok on federal devices Yates spars with GOP at testy hearing MORE (R), previously the state's attorney general, in a crucial pickup for Republicans who saw a net gain of two seats in the Senate during the midterm elections.

Hawley won the seat by 6 points after President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeWine tests negative for coronavirus a second time Several GOP lawmakers express concern over Trump executive orders Beirut aftermath poses test for US aid to frustrating ally MORE previously won Missouri by roughly 18 points in the 2016 election.