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McCaskill: 'Too many embarrassing uncles' in the Senate

Outgoing Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillThe Memo: Punish Trump or risk a repeat, warn Democrats GOP senators criticized for appearing to pay half-hearted attention to trial Hawley watches trial from visitor's gallery MORE (D-Mo.) jabbed at her colleagues in her final Senate floor speech on Thursday, arguing that the Senate was filled with "too many embarrassing uncles."

In her speech, McCaskill knocked "dysfunction" in the Senate and said senators were afraid of making tough votes.

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"Peter Morgan, an author, wrote that no family is complete without an embarrassing uncle," McCaskill said Thursday. "We have too many embarrassing uncles in the United States Senate. Lots of embarrassing stuff."

"The United States Senate is no longer the world's greatest deliberative body," McCaskill continued in her farewell address to the chamber. "And everybody needs to quit saying it, until we recover from this period of polarization and the fear of the political consequences of tough votes."

McCaskill delivered her farewell speech Thursday alongside other departing U.S. senators including Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeKlain on Manchin's objection to Neera Tanden: He 'doesn't answer to us at the White House' Tanden's path to confirmation looks increasingly untenable On The Money: What's next for Neera Tanden's nomination MORE (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonFlorida Democrats mired in division, debt ahead of 2022 Centrist Democrats pose major problem for progressives NRSC chair says he'll back GOP incumbents against Trump primary challengers MORE (D-Fla.).

The two-term Missouri Democrat was denied a third term in November by Sen.-elect Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyTrump to attack Biden in CPAC speech Laurence Tribe: Justice Thomas is out of order on 2020 election The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Finger-pointing on Capitol riot; GOP balks at Biden relief plan MORE (R), previously the state's attorney general, in a crucial pickup for Republicans who saw a net gain of two seats in the Senate during the midterm elections.

Hawley won the seat by 6 points after President TrumpDonald TrumpSenators given no timeline on removal of National Guard, Capitol fence Democratic fury with GOP explodes in House Georgia secretary of state withholds support for 'reactionary' GOP voting bills MORE previously won Missouri by roughly 18 points in the 2016 election.