Trump leaves GOP in turmoil with shutdown looming

Republicans are girding themselves for a partial government shutdown, just in time for Christmas.

The partial shutdown has grown more and more likely, they say, because of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump claims media 'smeared' students involved in encounter with Native American man Al Sharpton criticizes Trump’s ‘secret’ visit to MLK monument Gillibrand cites spirituality in 2020 fight against Trump’s ‘dark’ values MORE’s self-defeating comments at a White House meeting with congressional Democrats earlier this week about how he would accept blame for a shutdown caused by his demands for $5 billion in wall funding.

Two days later, the GOP has no plan for keeping the government open — or for escaping blame for a partial shutdown.

“There is no discernable plan, none that’s been disclosed,” Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynGraham angers Dems by digging into Clinton, Obama controversies Trump tells GOP senators he’s sticking to Syria and Afghanistan pullout  Texas governor, top lawmakers tell Trump not to use hurricane relief funds to build border wall MORE (Texas) said when asked how President Trump and GOP leaders would avoid a shut down.

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GOP lawmakers are waiting on Trump to signal what kind of funding bill he’s willing to sign into law in the face of staunch Democratic opposition to spending any new money on a border wall. 

“Everybody is looking to him for a signal about what he wants to do, and so far it’s not clear,” Cornyn said of the president.  

The House held its last vote of the week Thursday and will not be back in session until Wednesday — just two days before the deadline for keeping the government open.

GOP leaders have talked about moving a funding bill that includes the $5 billion in funding for a wall. They’ve even said they believe they could get the votes for the legislation. But the fact that they have not brought a bill to the floor suggests they lack the votes, since passing the bill could give them more leverage in the fight with Democrats.

Trump at the Tuesday meeting with Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerProtecting our judiciary must be a priority in the 116th Congress Baldwin's Trump plays 'Deal or No Deal' with shutdown on 'Saturday Night Live' Sunday shows preview: Shutdown negotiations continue after White House immigration proposal MORE (D-N.Y.) and House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiElise Stefanik seeks to tackle GOP’s women ‘crisis’ ahead of 2020 Our legislators must commit to making children a priority Dreamer: Dems 'should absolutely not' take Trump's immigration deal MORE (D-Calif.) said he could have a bill passed by the House easily. “Then do it,” Pelosi said, goading the president.

Rep. Patrick McHenryPatrick Timothy McHenryOn The Money: Shutdown Day 26 | Pelosi calls on Trump to delay State of the Union | Cites 'security concerns' | DHS chief says they can handle security | Waters lays out agenda | Senate rejects effort to block Trump on Russia sanctions Local banks can lead bipartisan efforts on financial regulation Senate agrees to last-ditch talks, but no clear path over shutdown MORE (R-N.C.), the chief deputy whip, asked whether the GOP would gain leverage by passing the funding bill with $5 billion in wall funding, said he wasn’t sure it was in the House GOP’s interest to send the bill to the Senate if it couldn’t get through that chamber.

“Ok, so it's December after the election. We shouldn't be here for show, we should be here to get our work done and get out of here,” he told reporters Wednesday evening. “We have to look at where we are in this process and what is the additive piece here: Is it the stay and wait or is it to take action? So those two things matter for a call like this.” 

Republicans are coming off an election in which they lost 40 seats, and their leadership is in transition.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanTrump once asked Paul Ryan why he couldn’t be ‘loyal': book AEI names Robert Doar as new president GOP can't excommunicate King and ignore Trump playing to white supremacy and racism MORE (R-Wis.), who is retiring at the end of the year, has largely kept out of public view. His deputies, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyElise Stefanik seeks to tackle GOP’s women ‘crisis’ ahead of 2020 Steve King fundraising off controversy surrounding white supremacy comments House rejects GOP measure to pay workers but not open government MORE (R-Calif.) and Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseElise Stefanik seeks to tackle GOP’s women ‘crisis’ ahead of 2020 Democrats will push to retake vote on funding government after chaos on the floor Pelosi pulls State of the Union surprise on Trump MORE (R-La.), aren’t always on the same page.  

Scalise announced Thursday that the House would advance a bill with Trump’s requested $5 billion for the border wall. 

But McCarthy seemed unaware of that plan, according to Bloomberg News, which reported that when asked about it, McCarthy told a reporter, “I didn’t hear him say that. ... Interesting.”    

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyCentrist efforts to convince Trump to end shutdown falter Bipartisan group of senators will urge Trump to reopen government for 3 weeks Leaders nix recess with no shutdown deal in sight MORE (R-Ala.) said the House’s failure to pass a bill presented a significant problem.

“That’s a central question,” he said. “We’re at an impasse and at the moment it doesn’t look like things are getting any better.”

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He floated the possibility of Congress passing an emergency stopgap bill funding the government until Dec. 26 or Jan. 3. He also said there is discussion about a stopgap lasting until late January or early February. 

A House GOP aide said the negotiations now are primarily between the president and Senate leaders. 

“At this point it’s really between Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerProtecting our judiciary must be a priority in the 116th Congress Baldwin's Trump plays 'Deal or No Deal' with shutdown on 'Saturday Night Live' Sunday shows preview: Shutdown negotiations continue after White House immigration proposal MORE and Trump,” the source said.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGraham angers Dems by digging into Clinton, Obama controversies Senate GOP eyes 'nuclear option' for Trump nominees next week Taiwan’s President Tsai should be invited to address Congress MORE (R-Ky.) is the GOP's Senate point man in talks with Trump, but he and the president disagree on tactics. 

While Trump declared Tuesday that he would be proud to shut down the government over border security, McConnell strongly wants to avoid that scenario.

“He has zero interest in going through a government shutdown,” said Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoOvernight Energy: Wheeler weathers climate criticism at confirmation hearing | Dems want Interior to stop drilling work during shutdown | 2018 was hottest year for oceans Dems blast EPA nominee at confirmation hearing Republican senators skeptical of using national emergency for wall funding MORE (R-W.Va.), the chairwoman of the Senate Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee, said of McConnell. 

Rank-and-file Republicans are also pushing back against Trump’s threat to shut down the government.

“This is a case where I think people are putting their political interests ahead of the best interests of the American people. The best interest of the American people is for the government to function smoothly,” said Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeBottom Line Dems hit GOP on health care with additional ObamaCare lawsuit vote Overnight Health Care: House files motion to defend ObamaCare in lawsuit | Trump Medicaid director leaving after three months MORE (R-Okla.), a member of the House Appropriations Committee.

“I personally don’t think a government shutdown will work,” he added.

Schumer on Thursday morning declared in a Senate floor speech that Democrats won’t budge from the offer they made to Trump in the Oval Office Tuesday. 

He said Democrats will pass a yearlong stopgap bill funding the Department of Homeland Security or a measure funding all the departments and agencies covered by the seven unfinished appropriations bills. 

Both options would keep funding for border fencing at the same level Congress appropriated for fiscal 2018: $1.3 billion. 

“I want to be crystal clear. There will be no additional appropriations to pay for the border wall. It’s done,” Schumer declared on the Senate floor.

In the House, some Republicans sounded ready to try to find a compromise — and a way out.

“We need to secure our borders, I support that, I support the president, but at some point and time we need to get things done,” said Rep. Paul MitchellPaul MitchellDem leaders avert censure vote against Steve King Steve King faces new storm over remarks about white supremacy GOP conference chair: Steve King's comments were 'abhorrent' and 'racist' MORE (R-Mich.).

With few bargaining chips left on the table, a lame-duck Speaker and Democrats set to retake the majority in January, House Republicans are acknowledging their colleagues across the aisle may have the upper hand. 

“Well, with the dynamic of the Senate, I think there's certainly some degree of truth there and with the change of the majority in the House, that I think gives the Democrats a little more leverage than they would have otherwise,” Rep. Dan NewhouseDaniel (Dan) Milton NewhouseTrump leaves GOP in turmoil with shutdown looming Washington governor announces killer whale recovery plan GOP struggles to find right Republican for Rules MORE (R-Wash.) told The Hill. “I don't know if they have the upper hand, but they certainly have a more equal hand than they would have otherwise.”