Senate passes criminal justice overhaul, handing Trump a win

The Senate passed a bipartisan criminal justice reform bill on Tuesday night, handing a significant victory to President TrumpDonald TrumpHillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — Twitter's algorithm boosts right-leaning content, internal study finds Ohio Democrat calls Vance an 'ass----' over Baldwin tweet Matt Taibbi says Trump's rhetoric caused public perception of US intelligence services to shift MORE and senators who lobbied to advance the legislation before the end of the year.

Senators voted 87-12 on the legislation, which merges a House-passed prison reform bill aimed at reducing recidivism with a handful of changes to sentencing laws and mandatory minimum prison sentences.

Its passage is also a win for Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerTrump attacks Meghan McCain and her family McCain: Ivanka Trump, Jared Kushner had 'no goddamn business' attending father's funeral Hillicon Valley — Presented by LookingGlass — Hackers are making big money MORE, Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, who took on criminal justice reform as one of his primary policy goals and who has lobbied individual senators to back the bill for months.

Conservative lawmakers had scrambled to make changes to the White House-backed bill ahead of the vote Tuesday night. Twelve Republican senators ended up voting against the measure despite Trump’s support.

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The bill still needs to clear the House, which starts back in session on Wednesday, before it can go to Trump’s desk for a signature. Advocates believe it will get a vote in the lower chamber as soon as Thursday as lawmakers aim to wrap up their work this week before leaving town for the holiday recess.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanJuan Williams: Pelosi shows her power Cheney takes shot at Trump: 'I like Republican presidents who win re-election' Cheney allies flock to her defense against Trump challenge MORE (R-Wis.) indicated after the Senate vote that the House would take it up before the end of the year.

"Criminal justice reform is about giving more Americans a chance at redemption. The House looks forward to sending it to the president to become law," he said in a tweet

Trump quickly touted passage of the legislation in the Senate on Tuesday night, tweeting that the bill "will keep our communities safer, and provide hope and a second chance, to those who earn it."

Senate passage of the criminal justice bill is a major victory for advocates following years of legislative limbo for such bills amid vocal opposition from conservatives and an indifferent reception from GOP leadership. Republicans appeared poised as recently as this month to punt the bill to 2019 amid deep divisions in the GOP caucus and a tight floor schedule.

Supporters got a major break in November when Trump endorsed the bill, calling it “tough on crime” and telling lawmakers he was “waiting with a pen” to sign the legislation. He doubled down earlier this month on urging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden says he's open to altering, eliminating filibuster to advance voting rights Pelosi says GOP senators 'voted to aid and abet' voter suppression for blocking revised elections bill Manchin insists he hasn't threatened to leave Democrats MORE (R-Ky.) to bring the bill for a vote before the end of the year, saying in a tweet, “Go for it Mitch!”

Those backing the bill touted the president's support for the legislation, pledging that criminal justice reform would give the White House a major bipartisan win before Republicans lose their unified government starting in January.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyAnother voice of reason retires Overnight Health Care — Presented by Carequest — FDA moves to sell hearing aids over-the-counter McConnell: GOP should focus on future, not 'rehash' 2020 MORE (R-Iowa), the outgoing chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said even Trump — “who has a reputation for being tough on crime” — supported the bill because he realized there was “unfairness” within the judicial system and that Republicans could be both “tough on crime” but also “fair on crime.”

“This is an opportunity for a Republican majority in the United States Senate to show that this Republican president can do something that even President Obama couldn’t get done,” Grassley said Tuesday, adding that passage of the bill is a “big, bipartisan legislative accomplishment” for the president.

Senators have been negotiating on a potential criminal justice deal for months, working closely with Kushner.

For a group of conservative senators, Trump’s backing wasn’t enough to quell their opposition to the bill. In the end, 12 GOP senators voted against the bill: John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoSenate appears poised to advance first Native American to lead National Park Service Sunday shows preview: Senate votes to raise debt ceiling; Facebook whistleblower blasts company during testimony The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - After high drama, Senate lifts debt limit MORE (Wyo.), Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonIs the Navy totally at sea? The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Altria - House debt vote today; Biden struggles to unite Arkansas legislature splits Little Rock in move that guarantees GOP seats MORE (Ark.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziCheney on same-sex marriage opposition: 'I was wrong' What Republicans should demand in exchange for raising the debt ceiling Senate votes to end debate on T infrastructure bill MORE (Wyo.), John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.), Jon Kyl (Ariz.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiHouse passes bill to expand workplace protections for nursing mothers Democrats look for plan B on filibuster Senate will vote on John Lewis voting bill as soon as next week MORE (Alaska), Jim RischJim Elroy RischOvernight Defense & National Security — Presented by Raytheon Technologies — Biden backtracks on Taiwan Top GOP senators want joint review of Afghan visa process Biden pick for China envoy raises concern over nuclear buildup MORE (Idaho), Ben SasseBen SasseNearly 200 Americans want to leave Afghanistan, State Department tells Congress Trump goes after Cassidy after senator says he wouldn't support him for president in 2024 Invoking 'Big Tech' as an accusation can endanger American security MORE (Neb.), Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanOvernight Health Care — Presented by Carequest — Key CDC panel backs Moderna, J&J boosters GOP senators call on Biden to back down from vaccine mandates Alaska man accused of threatening senators to remain detained ahead of trial MORE (Alaska), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSenate GOP campaign arm outraises Democratic counterpart in September House passes bills to secure telecommunications infrastructure Senators call for answers from US firm over reported use of forced Uyghur labor in China MORE (Fla.), Mike RoundsMike RoundsSenate GOP signals they'll help bail out Biden's Fed chair The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - After high drama, Senate lifts debt limit Schumer frustrates GOP, Manchin with fiery debt ceiling speech MORE (S.D.) and Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyBlack Hawk pilot shot down in Somalia jumps into Alabama Senate race Senate Democrats ditch Hyde amendment for first time in decades Senate Democrats unveil remaining spending bills, teeing up clash with Republicans MORE (Ala.). 

Senators on Tuesday also voted down several floated changes from Cotton and Kennedy, who were the bill's biggest opponents in the Senate.

Cotton argued that his amendments were in line with the intent of the bill and would “fix some of the worst part of the bill.” But, he added, he still believed the legislation is “deeply unwise” and would result in the “early release from prison thousands of serious, repeat and potentially violent felons over the next few months.”

“There are very modest amendments. The are consistent with the rhetoric of the bill’s sponsors. I know that some of the sponsors have said this is a poison pill. I frankly don’t see why. It is consistent with their own rhetoric,” Cotton said.

Kennedy separately told reporters that he wouldn’t support the bill even if his amendments were added, saying, “I just think the approach is wrong.”

The Cotton-Kennedy amendments would including requiring that the victims or families of victims are notified when an individual is released. Another change would be to make publicly available the rearrest data for those released, as well as information on prior offenses by those released and the crimes for which they were imprisoned.

The Kennedy-Cotton amendments would also add approximately 10 offenses to a list that excludes someone from being eligible for the bill’s earned-time credits, which could be used to shorten sentences.

But each of their amendments was rejected with more than a dozen GOP senators joining with Democrats to block them from getting added to the bill, warning that their inclusion would threaten support for the legislation and likely sink its chances of passing the Senate.

No Democrats voted for Cotton and Kennedy's proposed changes on Tuesday night and Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinManchin: Negotiators to miss Friday target for deal on reconciliation bill Democrats look for plan B on filibuster The Memo: Cuts to big bill vex Democrats MORE (Ill.), the No. 2 Senate Democrat, warned the caucus was “overwhelmingly opposed” to them.

The criminal justice fight put a spotlight on the sort of GOP divisions leadership generally tries to avoid. And McConnell, who ended up voting for the bill, acknowledged earlier Tuesday that some members of his caucus continued to have “outstanding concerns that the bill currently leaves unaddressed.”

Grassley tried to bring up an amendment that included changes for faith-based groups, would add additional crimes that exclude an individual from earning credits that reduce a sentence, extend an independent review committee tasked with overseeing implementation of the bill from two to five years and require annual supports.

The amendment would have worked in requested changes from GOP Sens. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordBill requiring companies report cyber incidents moves forward in the Senate Manchin's 'red line' on abortion splits Democrats Lankford draws second GOP primary challenger in Oklahoma MORE (Okla.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Health Care — Presented by Carequest — Colin Powell's death highlights risks for immunocompromised The Senate confirmation process is broken — Senate Democrats can fix it Australian politician on Cruz, vaccines: 'We don't need your lectures, thanks mate' MORE (Texas) that are considered noncontroversial by both sides, but Kennedy objected because of the extension of the review committee.

“If you believe our sentencing laws are unjust then I am prepared to stay here night and day through Christmas and let’s debate them and fix them,” he said. “But that’s not what this is doing. What this is doing is giving away all our authority as United States senators to nameless bureaucrats.”

Instead they approved an amendment advocated by Lankford that only included the changes for faith-based groups and the additional exclusions on what criminals are eligible for the earned-time credits, requested by Cruz.

Drafters of the legislation said they thought they had included the changes in a revised bill they rolled out last week, but acknowledged after filing it that the provisions for Lankford and Cruz were left out and instead would have to be added on the floor.

The Senate’s passage of the criminal justice bill is years in the making. Grassley and Durbin led a bipartisan group of senators who introduced a broader sentencing and prison reform bill in 2015, only to see the legislation go nowhere despite believing they had 60 votes.

Supporters blamed the standstill on leadership not wanting to highlight GOP divisions heading into the 2016 election, when they were defending two dozen Senate seats.

They reintroduced the bill in 2017 but acknowledged they had an uphill climb with Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump criticizes Justice for restoring McCabe's benefits McCabe wins back full FBI pension after being fired under Trump Overnight Hillicon Valley — Apple issues security update against spyware vulnerability MORE, who had been a vocal Senate opponent to the bill, as attorney general and Trump in the White House. And they were at a standstill with the House for months, which passed a prison reform only bill earlier this year.

Durbin and Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerSenate Democrats call for diversity among new Federal Reserve Bank presidents Progressives push back on decision to shrink Biden's paid family leave program Emanuel to take hot seat in Senate confirmation hearing MORE (D-N.J.) have also been furiously working to build Democratic support for the bill amid public concerns that Trump’s endorsement of the bill could spark backlash from several Democrats eyeing White House bids in 2020.

No Democrats voted against the bill on Tuesday night.

“We’ve worked long and hard on this. We’ve had policy groups, prosecutors, civil liberties groups. All have carefully reviewed this. No one is getting what they wanted completely. This is a product of compromise. But that’s how you pass a bill in the United States Senate,” Durbin said. 

Updated: 9:10 p.m.