Senate passes criminal justice overhaul, handing Trump a win

The Senate passed a bipartisan criminal justice reform bill on Tuesday night, handing a significant victory to President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew EPA rule would expand Trump officials' powers to reject FOIA requests Democratic senator introduces bill to ban gun silencers Democrats: Ex-Commerce aide said Ross asked him to examine adding census citizenship question MORE and senators who lobbied to advance the legislation before the end of the year.

Senators voted 87-12 on the legislation, which merges a House-passed prison reform bill aimed at reducing recidivism with a handful of changes to sentencing laws and mandatory minimum prison sentences.

Its passage is also a win for Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerTrump puts the cart before the horse in Palestine Negotiators face major obstacles to meeting July border deadline GOP launches 'WinRed' online fundraising site in response to Democrats' small-donor advantage MORE, Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, who took on criminal justice reform as one of his primary policy goals and who has lobbied individual senators to back the bill for months.

Conservative lawmakers had scrambled to make changes to the White House-backed bill ahead of the vote Tuesday night. Twelve Republican senators ended up voting against the measure despite Trump’s support.

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The bill still needs to clear the House, which starts back in session on Wednesday, before it can go to Trump’s desk for a signature. Advocates believe it will get a vote in the lower chamber as soon as Thursday as lawmakers aim to wrap up their work this week before leaving town for the holiday recess.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanPaul Ryan praises Trump: 'He's not taking any crap' The Hill's Morning Report - Crunch time arrives for 2020 Dems with debates on deck Ocasio-Cortez calls out Steve King, Liz Cheney amid controversy over concentration camp remarks MORE (R-Wis.) indicated after the Senate vote that the House would take it up before the end of the year.

"Criminal justice reform is about giving more Americans a chance at redemption. The House looks forward to sending it to the president to become law," he said in a tweet

Trump quickly touted passage of the legislation in the Senate on Tuesday night, tweeting that the bill "will keep our communities safer, and provide hope and a second chance, to those who earn it."

Senate passage of the criminal justice bill is a major victory for advocates following years of legislative limbo for such bills amid vocal opposition from conservatives and an indifferent reception from GOP leadership. Republicans appeared poised as recently as this month to punt the bill to 2019 amid deep divisions in the GOP caucus and a tight floor schedule.

Supporters got a major break in November when Trump endorsed the bill, calling it “tough on crime” and telling lawmakers he was “waiting with a pen” to sign the legislation. He doubled down earlier this month on urging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellEXCLUSIVE: Trump on reparations: 'I don't see it happening' Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids — Trump issues order to bring transparency to health care prices | Fight over billions in ObamaCare payments heads to Supreme Court Hillicon Valley: Senate bill would force companies to disclose value of user data | Waters to hold hearing on Facebook cryptocurrency | GOP divided on election security bills | US tracking Russian, Iranian social media campaigns MORE (R-Ky.) to bring the bill for a vote before the end of the year, saying in a tweet, “Go for it Mitch!”

Those backing the bill touted the president's support for the legislation, pledging that criminal justice reform would give the White House a major bipartisan win before Republicans lose their unified government starting in January.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGrassley raises concerns about objectivity of report critical of GOP tax law's effects Overnight Health Care: Key Trump drug pricing proposal takes step forward | Missouri Planned Parenthood clinic loses bid for license | 2020 Democrats to take part in Saturday forum on abortion rights Key Trump proposal to lower drug prices takes step forward MORE (R-Iowa), the outgoing chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said even Trump — “who has a reputation for being tough on crime” — supported the bill because he realized there was “unfairness” within the judicial system and that Republicans could be both “tough on crime” but also “fair on crime.”

“This is an opportunity for a Republican majority in the United States Senate to show that this Republican president can do something that even President Obama couldn’t get done,” Grassley said Tuesday, adding that passage of the bill is a “big, bipartisan legislative accomplishment” for the president.

Senators have been negotiating on a potential criminal justice deal for months, working closely with Kushner.

For a group of conservative senators, Trump’s backing wasn’t enough to quell their opposition to the bill. In the end, 12 GOP senators voted against the bill: John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoTrump proposal nixes review of long-term climate impacts Bipartisan senators propose forcing EPA to set drinking water standard for 'forever chemicals' Trump hails D-Day veterans in Normandy: 'You are the pride of our nation' MORE (Wyo.), Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonUS officials express optimism negotiations with Iran possible Cotton: 'Healthy skepticism warranted' when dealing with Democrats on immigration Cotton: I hope Trump's statement 'got through' to Iran's leaders MORE (Ark.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziBottom Line Former GOP Rep. Cynthia Lummis files to run for Wyoming Senate seat Beware of the 'unknown knowns' of budget reform MORE (Wyo.), John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.), Jon Kyl (Ariz.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiGOP lawmakers want Mulvaney sidelined in budget talks Overnight Defense: Officials brief Congress after Iran shoots down drone | Lawmakers fear 'grave situation' | Trump warns Iran | Senate votes to block Saudi arms sales | Bombshell confession at Navy SEAL's murder trial The 7 GOP senators who voted to block all or part of Trump's Saudi arms sale MORE (Alaska), Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischOvernight Defense: Officials brief Congress after Iran shoots down drone | Lawmakers fear 'grave situation' | Trump warns Iran | Senate votes to block Saudi arms sales | Bombshell confession at Navy SEAL's murder trial Senate votes to block Trump's Saudi arms sale Trump's UN pick faces Senate grilling MORE (Idaho), Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseSwing-state Democrats see trouble in proposed pay hike House Dems move to give lawmakers a pay increase Conservatives spark threat of bloody GOP primaries MORE (Neb.), Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanSenators weigh potential security risks from Chinese-made drones August recess under threat as yearly spending bills pile up Overnight Health Care: Liberals rip Democratic leaders for writing drug pricing bill in secret | Dems demand answers from company that shelters migrant kids | Measles cases top 1,000 MORE (Alaska), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids — Trump issues order to bring transparency to health care prices | Fight over billions in ObamaCare payments heads to Supreme Court Ex-Obama counterterrorism official: Huawei could pose security threat to international intelligence community The Memo: All eyes on faltering Biden ahead of first debate MORE (Fla.), Mike RoundsMarion (Mike) Michael RoundsHouse panel advances bill to create cybersecurity standards for government IT devices The Hill's Morning Report - Trump, Biden go toe-to-toe in Iowa August recess under threat as yearly spending bills pile up MORE (S.D.) and Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyThis week: Congress set for clash on Trump's border request Congress unlikely to reach deal on Trump border bill before break GOP lawmakers want Mulvaney sidelined in budget talks MORE (Ala.). 

Senators on Tuesday also voted down several floated changes from Cotton and Kennedy, who were the bill's biggest opponents in the Senate.

Cotton argued that his amendments were in line with the intent of the bill and would “fix some of the worst part of the bill.” But, he added, he still believed the legislation is “deeply unwise” and would result in the “early release from prison thousands of serious, repeat and potentially violent felons over the next few months.”

“There are very modest amendments. The are consistent with the rhetoric of the bill’s sponsors. I know that some of the sponsors have said this is a poison pill. I frankly don’t see why. It is consistent with their own rhetoric,” Cotton said.

Kennedy separately told reporters that he wouldn’t support the bill even if his amendments were added, saying, “I just think the approach is wrong.”

The Cotton-Kennedy amendments would including requiring that the victims or families of victims are notified when an individual is released. Another change would be to make publicly available the rearrest data for those released, as well as information on prior offenses by those released and the crimes for which they were imprisoned.

The Kennedy-Cotton amendments would also add approximately 10 offenses to a list that excludes someone from being eligible for the bill’s earned-time credits, which could be used to shorten sentences.

But each of their amendments was rejected with more than a dozen GOP senators joining with Democrats to block them from getting added to the bill, warning that their inclusion would threaten support for the legislation and likely sink its chances of passing the Senate.

No Democrats voted for Cotton and Kennedy's proposed changes on Tuesday night and Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinNegotiators face major obstacles to meeting July border deadline Senate set to bypass Iran fight amid growing tensions Schumer calls for delay on passage of defense bill amid Iran tensions MORE (Ill.), the No. 2 Senate Democrat, warned the caucus was “overwhelmingly opposed” to them.

The criminal justice fight put a spotlight on the sort of GOP divisions leadership generally tries to avoid. And McConnell, who ended up voting for the bill, acknowledged earlier Tuesday that some members of his caucus continued to have “outstanding concerns that the bill currently leaves unaddressed.”

Grassley tried to bring up an amendment that included changes for faith-based groups, would add additional crimes that exclude an individual from earning credits that reduce a sentence, extend an independent review committee tasked with overseeing implementation of the bill from two to five years and require annual supports.

The amendment would have worked in requested changes from GOP Sens. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordGOP senators divided over approach to election security Hillicon Valley: Facebook unveils new cryptocurrency | Waters wants company to halt plans | Democrats look to force votes on election security | Advertisers partner with tech giants on 'digital safety' | House GOP unveils cyber agenda Democrats detail new strategy to pressure McConnell on election security bills MORE (Okla.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz Hickenlooper, Bennet bring deep ties to 2020 debate stage 2020 Democrat Bennet releases comprehensive government reform plan GOP frets about Trump's poll numbers MORE (Texas) that are considered noncontroversial by both sides, but Kennedy objected because of the extension of the review committee.

“If you believe our sentencing laws are unjust then I am prepared to stay here night and day through Christmas and let’s debate them and fix them,” he said. “But that’s not what this is doing. What this is doing is giving away all our authority as United States senators to nameless bureaucrats.”

Instead they approved an amendment advocated by Lankford that only included the changes for faith-based groups and the additional exclusions on what criminals are eligible for the earned-time credits, requested by Cruz.

Drafters of the legislation said they thought they had included the changes in a revised bill they rolled out last week, but acknowledged after filing it that the provisions for Lankford and Cruz were left out and instead would have to be added on the floor.

The Senate’s passage of the criminal justice bill is years in the making. Grassley and Durbin led a bipartisan group of senators who introduced a broader sentencing and prison reform bill in 2015, only to see the legislation go nowhere despite believing they had 60 votes.

Supporters blamed the standstill on leadership not wanting to highlight GOP divisions heading into the 2016 election, when they were defending two dozen Senate seats.

They reintroduced the bill in 2017 but acknowledged they had an uphill climb with Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump: Appointing Sessions was my biggest mistake Nikki Haley blasts Roy Moore's Senate bid: 'He does not represent our Republican Party' Time magazine: Trump threatened reporter with prison time MORE, who had been a vocal Senate opponent to the bill, as attorney general and Trump in the White House. And they were at a standstill with the House for months, which passed a prison reform only bill earlier this year.

Durbin and Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBiden to debate for first time as front-runner Rules for first Democratic primary debates announced Press: Democrats form circular firing squad MORE (D-N.J.) have also been furiously working to build Democratic support for the bill amid public concerns that Trump’s endorsement of the bill could spark backlash from several Democrats eyeing White House bids in 2020.

No Democrats voted against the bill on Tuesday night.

“We’ve worked long and hard on this. We’ve had policy groups, prosecutors, civil liberties groups. All have carefully reviewed this. No one is getting what they wanted completely. This is a product of compromise. But that’s how you pass a bill in the United States Senate,” Durbin said. 

Updated: 9:10 p.m.