GOP moves to prevent shutdown with stopgap spending bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLawmakers run into major speed bumps on spending bills Budowsky: Donald, Boris, Bibi — The right in retreat Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to meet with lawmakers | Big tech defends efforts against online extremism | Trump attends secretive Silicon Valley fundraiser | Omar urges Twitter to take action against Trump tweet MORE (R-Ky.) said Wednesday he will move a stopgap measure funding the government until early February. 

The measure if passed by Congress and signed into law by President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump conversation with foreign leader part of complaint that led to standoff between intel chief, Congress: report Pelosi: Lewandowski should have been held in contempt 'right then and there' Trump to withdraw FEMA chief nominee: report MORE would prevent a partial shutdown set to begin Saturday and would fund government departments and agencies through Feb. 8.

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It will keep funding for border fencing flat and punt a showdown on that issue until next year — when Trump will have less leverage with Democrats in control of the House.

McConnell warned that Trump has no intention of dropping the issue.
 
"There will be important unfinished business in front of us and we'll owe it to the American people to finally tackle it," he said. 
 
The move signals that negotiations between Senate Republicans and Democrats over a larger spending package are breaking down.  

McConnell said the stopgap is necessary because “our Democratic colleagues rejected an extremely reasonable offer,” which Trump and the GOP leader offered this week: a spending package that included $1.6 billion for border fencing and $1 billion for other immigration-related matters. 

Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSchumer, Pelosi push Trump to back universal background check bill Sinema says she would back Kennedy in race against Markey Democrats threaten to withhold defense votes over wall MORE (N.Y.) later rejected what he said would be a “slush fund” for Trump to carry out his “radical” immigration agenda. 

“I’m sorry that my Democratic colleagues couldn’t put the partisanship aside and show the same good-faith flexibility that the president has shown in order to provide the resources of our nation needs to secure the integrity of our borders as well as the safety of American families,” McConnell said on Wednesday. 

McConnell said he will continue to negotiate with Schumer and House Democratic Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi: Lewandowski should have been held in contempt 'right then and there' Democrats bicker over strategy on impeachment Overnight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Pelosi set to unveil drug price plan | Abortion rate in US hits lowest level since Roe v. Wade | Dems threaten to subpoena Juul MORE (Calif.) but plans to move the stopgap measure as a fallback. 

"The Senate will continue our work on the remaining bills, the result of bipartisan work and collaboration, and in the meantime we will turn to a clean continuing resolution later today so we can make sure we don't end this year the way we began it, with another government shutdown because of Democrats' allergy to sensible policies," he said.