GOP moves to prevent shutdown with stopgap spending bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care: White House projects grim death toll from coronavirus | Trump warns of 'painful' weeks ahead | US surpasses China in official virus deaths | CDC says 25 percent of cases never show symptoms 14 things to know for today about coronavirus Trump says he wouldn't have acted differently on coronavirus without impeachment MORE (R-Ky.) said Wednesday he will move a stopgap measure funding the government until early February. 

The measure if passed by Congress and signed into law by President TrumpDonald John TrumpIllinois governor says state has gotten 10 percent of medical equipments it's requested Biden leads Trump by 6 points in national poll Tesla offers ventilators free of cost to hospitals, Musk says MORE would prevent a partial shutdown set to begin Saturday and would fund government departments and agencies through Feb. 8.

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It will keep funding for border fencing flat and punt a showdown on that issue until next year — when Trump will have less leverage with Democrats in control of the House.

McConnell warned that Trump has no intention of dropping the issue.
 
"There will be important unfinished business in front of us and we'll owe it to the American people to finally tackle it," he said. 
 
The move signals that negotiations between Senate Republicans and Democrats over a larger spending package are breaking down.  

McConnell said the stopgap is necessary because “our Democratic colleagues rejected an extremely reasonable offer,” which Trump and the GOP leader offered this week: a spending package that included $1.6 billion for border fencing and $1 billion for other immigration-related matters. 

Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerMcConnell launches ad touting role in passing coronavirus relief Joe Biden can't lead the charge from his home in Delaware Texas man arrested for allegedly threatening Democrats over coronavirus bill MORE (N.Y.) later rejected what he said would be a “slush fund” for Trump to carry out his “radical” immigration agenda. 

“I’m sorry that my Democratic colleagues couldn’t put the partisanship aside and show the same good-faith flexibility that the president has shown in order to provide the resources of our nation needs to secure the integrity of our borders as well as the safety of American families,” McConnell said on Wednesday. 

McConnell said he will continue to negotiate with Schumer and House Democratic Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care: White House projects grim death toll from coronavirus | Trump warns of 'painful' weeks ahead | US surpasses China in official virus deaths | CDC says 25 percent of cases never show symptoms 14 things to know for today about coronavirus Hillicon Valley: Trump, telecom executives talk coronavirus response | Pelosi pushes funding for mail-in voting | New York AG wants probe into firing of Amazon worker | Marriott hit by another massive breach MORE (Calif.) but plans to move the stopgap measure as a fallback. 

"The Senate will continue our work on the remaining bills, the result of bipartisan work and collaboration, and in the meantime we will turn to a clean continuing resolution later today so we can make sure we don't end this year the way we began it, with another government shutdown because of Democrats' allergy to sensible policies," he said.