GOP senators reject Trump proposal to go 'nuclear' on wall

Senate Republicans quickly rejected President TrumpDonald John TrumpPentagon update to missile defense doctrine will explore space-base technologies, lasers to counter threats Giuliani: 'I never said there was no collusion' between the Trump campaign and Russia Former congressmen, RNC members appointed to Trump administration roles MORE's push that they go "nuclear" and change Senate rules to eliminate the legislative filibuster in order to pass a funding bill with $5 billion for his wall on the Mexican border.

"I’ve long said that eliminating the legislative filibuster would be a mistake," said outgoing Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchPhRMA CEO 'hopeful' Trump officials will back down on drug pricing move Live coverage: Trump AG pick grilled on Mueller probe at confirmation hearing Trump praises RNC chairwoman after she criticizes her uncle Mitt Romney MORE (R-Utah) in a string of tweets explaining his position. 

"It’s what’s prevented our country for decades from sliding toward liberalism. It’s inconvenient sometimes, but requiring compromise is in the interest of both parties in the long term," Hatch said.

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"The Senate filibuster is about the only mechanism left in Washington that brings the parties together. Deploying the nuclear option would blow that up. I will not vote to do it," Flake said. 
 
Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerThe Memo: Romney moves stir worries in Trump World Senate GOP names first female members to Judiciary panel Former US special envoy to anti-ISIS coalition joins Stanford University as lecturer MORE (R-Tenn.), who also is retiring early next month, said he would "continue to follow rules relative to legislation as they exist today as I finish my term." 
 
 
“We have rules to follow. I want to put a stop to this practice of the Senate breaking its rules to change its rules. I will not vote to turn the Senate into a rule-breaking institution and I hope that my colleagues will not," said Alexander, who announced this week that he would retire at the end of the next Congress.
 
 
"With the regard to the filibuster rule, as I've told him repeatedly, the votes aren't there to change it. They just aren't there," McConnell said at an event earlier this year, adding, "I simply disagree with the president about the harm that [the filibuster] does."
 
A spokesman for McConnell said that remains the leader's position.
 
"The Leader has said for years that the votes are not there in the Conference to use the nuclear option. Just this morning, several Senators put out statements confirming their opposition, and confirming that there is not a majority in the conference to go down that road," David Popp, a spokesman for McConnell, said in a statement. 
 
Trump, reversing course to blame Democrats for a partial shutdown, publicly urged McConnell to use the nuclear in a tweet, adding that "our Country is counting on you!"
 
The demand comes as Congress has roughly 13 hours to prevent a partial government shutdown expected to begin Saturday. 
 
Both sides remain far apart on funding for the border with no clear path on how to prevent a lapse in funding that would impact roughly 25 percent of the government. Republicans, including McConnell, went to the White House on Friday morning to talk with Trump.
 
The Senate passed a seven-week stopgap bill on Wednesday but Trump has said he will not sign the bill. House Republicans added $5.7 billion for the border as well as disaster recovery money to the legislation and kicked the shutdown fight back to the Senate.