Trump's military moves accelerate GOP search for next McCain

President TrumpDonald John TrumpHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Celebrating 'Hispanic Heritage Month' in the Age of Trump Let's not play Charlie Brown to Iran's Lucy MORE’s sudden announcements to pull U.S. troops out of Syria and dramatically reduce combat forces in Afghanistan have Republicans wondering who will fill the void left by the late John McCainJohn Sidney McCain The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Biden's debate performance renews questions of health At debate, Warren and Buttigieg tap idealism of Obama, FDR MORE, a prominent authority on national security willing to speak for the nation’s military commanders.

McCain’s absence was strongly felt last week when Trump unexpectedly announced his decision to pull U.S. troops out of Syria. While there was general pushback in the Senate, some observers said the GOP’s criticism of the commander in chief did not match the authoritative voice of McCain, who was a prisoner of war in Vietnam.

“We miss his voice and his actions,” said John Weaver, a longtime political adviser to McCain. “Can you imagine if John was still the chairman of the Armed Services Committee? It would have been rather dramatic.”

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Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeIs the Senate ready to protect American interests in space? Republicans grumble over Trump shifting military funds to wall Gun debate to shape 2020 races MORE (R-Okla.), the chairman of the Armed Services panel, is one of Trump’s staunchest allies on Capitol Hill, and the incoming chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Sen. Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischBolton exit provokes questions about Trump shift on Iran GOP senators say Trump deserves compatible national security adviser after Bolton firing Trump moves forward with billion F-16 sale to Taiwan MORE (R-Idaho), often defers to the president — at least compared to retiring panel chairman Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump announces, endorses ambassador to Japan's Tennessee Senate bid Meet the key Senate player in GOP fight over Saudi Arabia Trump says he's 'very happy' some GOP senators have 'gone on to greener pastures' MORE (R-Tenn.). 

McCain also spent almost every Christmas with U.S. troops overseas, whereas Trump made his first visit to a combat zone this week when he visited American forces in Iraq.

There’s also a growing sentiment among some Republican lawmakers that they need to do more to assert their independence from Trump on foreign policy and national security.

“I think senators need to step up and reassert a bigger role for the Senate in defining our foreign policy,” Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyNSA improperly collected US phone records in October, new documents show Overnight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns MORE (R-Pa.) told NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday. “With respect to foreign policy, in general, and Syria, in particular, we really have to step up.”

The leading contenders to take up McCain’s torch are Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamBolton exit provokes questions about Trump shift on Iran The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Graham: US should consider strike on Iranian oil refineries after attack on Saudi Arabia MORE (R-S.C.), who is spearheading the pushback on Trump’s Syria policy, and Sen.-elect Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt Romney The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Bolton returns to political group after exiting administration 2020 is not a family affair, for a change MORE (R-Utah), who was one of the first prominent voices to identify Russia as a dangerous geopolitical rival.

“There are only two people that have the standing and have shown the ability and past willingness to speak truth to power, and that’s Lindsey and Sen. Romney,” Weaver said. “There’s nobody else in our conference capable or willing to do that.”

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Corker was the Senate Republican Conference’s leading critic of Trump’s foreign policy decisions over the past two years, but he will retire at year’s end, leaving many to see Romney taking over that role.

“I would think Mitt Romney would be very vocal on these issues,” Corker told The Hill, citing what he called Trump’s “willy-nilly” tariff policy, the administration’s response to the murder of U.S.-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi and the decision to pull out of Syria.

“My guess is we’re building to a place where numbers of people [will speak out], and numbers of people are speaking out,” he said.

Romney, like McCain, ran two high-profile presidential campaigns and once won the party’s nomination. He was well out in front of most national leaders in the 2012 presidential election when he told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer that Russia “is without question our No. 1 geopolitical foe” and called then-President Obama’s willingness to negotiate with Russia “very troubling.”

Graham, who was McCain’s best friend in the Senate before the Arizona senator died in August, has introduced a resolution urging Trump to reverse his Syria decision and says he’s “willing to fight a Republican” president who doesn’t follow “sound military advice.”

Graham has been a voice for military leaders, much like McCain was when he was chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, in speaking out against the president.

Hours before Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisTrump needs a national security adviser who 'speaks softly' US could deploy 150 troops to Syria: report Trump blasts 'Mr. Tough Guy' Bolton: 'He made some very big mistakes' MORE announced his resignation, Graham told reporters that Mattis “thought the time was not right to leave” and is “very worried” about the future of Kurdish allies.

He invoked McCain’s name to bolster his argument on Syria, telling reporters: “John’s voice has been consistent, whether you agreed with him or not. We need to do more in Syria. It’s going to get worse if you leave and if you do nothing. As usual, he was almost always right.”

Republicans have traditionally dominated Democrats in the polls when it comes to national defense and the military, but some polls in the past year showed that advantage could slip as Trump has come under sharp criticism for disregarding military advice and pulling U.S. troops out of Syria.

Democrats gained some ground on national defense, an issue that isn’t surveyed as much as other hot-button topics like health care, immigration and gun control policy.

A survey from Quinnipiac University Poll from August showed the GOP’s advantage on national security starting to slip. Forty-eight percent of voters polled said they saw Republicans as better at handling defense issues, while 40 percent saw Democrats as more capable.

A Gallup poll from more than a year earlier — June 2017 — showed Republicans dominating Democrats on handling national defense and military issues, 57 percent to 35 percent.

Weaver said the party’s traditional strength on national security is slipping because “of Trump’s close ties to Russia and the way he has handled our alliances.”

“He defines the party these days,” he said.

Sen. Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedIs the Senate ready to protect American interests in space? Trump moving forward to divert .6B from military projects for border wall GOP lawmakers call for provisions barring DOD funds for border wall to be dropped MORE (R.I.), a West Point graduate who served with McCain on the Armed Services Committee and is now the top-ranking Democrat on the panel, said it’s going to take a long time for a Republican to fill McCain’s shoes.

“It’s not going to happen overnight. You’re stepping into the shoes of someone who is literally legendary. You’ll see things change but it will take a while,” he said.

Reed said McCain “would’ve objected strenuously” to last week’s decision to withdraw from Syria but added that no one in today’s GOP yet commands “the immediate attention, recognition and credibility” as McCain did as a two-time presidential candidate and war hero.

“But you’ll see people gradually emerging,” he added.

Graham and Romney, if he chooses to become a counterweight to Trump on foreign policy, could have support from a small group of Senate Republicans who are jockeying to become more influential voices on national security. They include Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio Rubio The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation GOP group's ad calls on Graham to push for election security: 'Are you still trying?' Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick joins CBS News as contributor MORE (Fla.), Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungSenators pressure Trump to help end humanitarian crisis in Kashmir Congress set for chaotic fall sprint Overnight Defense: Senate fails to override Trump veto on Saudi arms sales | Two US troops killed in Afghanistan | Senators tee up nominations, budget deal ahead of recess MORE (Ind.) and Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanExclusive: Kushner tells GOP it needs to unify behind immigration plan Republicans grumble over Trump shifting military funds to wall Overnight Defense: Esper sworn in as Pentagon chief | Confirmed in 90-8 vote | Takes helm as Trump juggles foreign policy challenges | Senators meet with woman accusing defense nominee of sexual assault MORE (Alaska).

Rubio warned after Trump’s chummy appearance with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Helsinki summit in July that “foreign policy must be based on reality, not hyperbole or wishful thinking. And the reality is Russia is an adversary.”

In November, Rubio criticized the Trump administration’s kid-glove treatment of Saudi Arabia after the murder of U.S.-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

“Our foreign policy must be about promoting our national interests. It is in our [national] interest to defend human rights,” he tweeted, arguing that looking past Saudi human rights abuses would “help extremism flourish.”

Sullivan and Young, who both have military credentials, were among a dozen Republican senators who grilled Vice President Pence over Trump’s Syria decision during a private meeting.

“They are positioning themselves, those who are speaking out,” said a Senate GOP aide.

Sullivan, a colonel in the Marine Corps Reserve, was called to active duty to serve with a counterterrorist task force in Afghanistan in 2013. He also served as a U.S. assistant secretary of State in the George W. Bush administration, where he worked on combating terrorist financing and energy and trade issues.

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann Murkowski The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Overnight Energy: Trump administration to repeal waterway protections| House votes to block drilling in Arctic refuge| Administration takes key step to open Alaskan refuge to drilling by end of year Overnight Health Care: Juul's lobbying efforts fall short as Trump moves to ban flavored e-cigarettes | Facebook removes fact check from anti-abortion video after criticism | Poll: Most Democrats want presidential candidate who would build on ObamaCare MORE (R-Alaska) said that kind of experience positions Sullivan to be an authoritative and independent voice on foreign policy and defense.

“He is not shy in expressing his views when it comes to national security,” she said. “He’s very much a patriot. He’s a very loyal Republican but he is one who will always put country first above the more political aspects of a debate.”

Young graduated from the Naval Academy with honors and accepted a commission in the Marine Corps, where he served as an intelligence officer.

McCain, who graduated from the Naval Academy more than 30 years before Young, saw the Indiana Republican as a potential ally after he was first elected to the Senate. 

And while Young has styled himself more as a traditional Republican than a McCain-style maverick, he has become one of the Senate’s most outspoken critics of the nation’s support of a Saudi-backed coalition fighting in Yemen’s civil war.

Young warns that famine caused by Saudi bombing of a port where humanitarian aid is received in Yemen could pose national security risks down the road.

“Starving people – denying them basic humanitarian assistance – leads to radicalization. We don’t want to create more terrorists,” he told USA Today in October.