Romney sworn in as senator

Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGiuliani: 'Nothing wrong' with campaign taking information from Russians Earth Day founder's daughter: Most Republican leaders believe in climate change in private Senate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller MORE was sworn into the Senate on Thursday, marking his formal re-entrance to Washington politics. 

Romney was sworn in by Vice President Pence to fill the seat held by outgoing Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchHatch warns 'dangerous' idea of court packing could hurt religious liberty Former Democratic aide pleads guilty to doxing GOP senators attending Kavanaugh hearing How do we prevent viral live streaming of New Zealand-style violence? MORE (R-Utah). He was accompanied on the floor by Hatch and Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeDems sound alarm over top DOJ nominee Restore Pell Grant eligibility to people in prison Former Democratic aide pleads guilty to doxing GOP senators attending Kavanaugh hearing MORE (R-Utah). 

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The former presidential candidate was spotted hobnobbing on the Senate floor before his swear in, shaking hands with Sen. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonOvernight Defense: Senators show skepticism over Space Force | Navy drops charges against officers in deadly collision | Trump taps next Navy chief Senators show deep skepticism on Space Force proposal GOP senators introduce bill to reduce legal immigration  MORE (R-Ark.) and Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsMenendez, Rubio lead Senate effort to regulate Venezuelan sanctions Dem report questions State Dept. decision to revoke award to Trump critic Senate Dem calls on Trump to apologize for attacks on McCain MORE (D-Del.), backslapping retiring Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerPollster says Trump unlikely to face 'significant' primary challenge GOP gets used to saying 'no' to Trump Democrats introduce bill to rein in Trump on tariffs MORE (R-Tenn.) and chatting with Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' 2020 Dems ratchet up anti-corporate talk in bid to woo unions MORE (D-N.Y.). 

Romney’s swearing-in comes days after he published an op-ed critical of President TrumpDonald John TrumpThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Obama condemns attacks in Sri Lanka as 'an attack on humanity' Schiff rips Conway's 'display of alternative facts' on Russian election interference MORE, who he argued hasn’t “risen to the mantle” of the presidency. 

The op-ed earned him pushback from President Trump, members of his own family and some of his Republican colleagues.

It’s a U-turn for Romney, who had routinely brushed off questions from reporters as he shuffled around the U.S. Capitol attending freshman orientation and largely kept his public focus off Trump following his comfortable election win. 

Reporters tried to approach him as he headed into the Senate chamber but were brushed off by a handler.  

Romney is one of nine new senators sworn, eight of whom were sworn in on Thursday. Sen.-elect Rick Scott (R-Fla.) is expected to be sworn in later this month. 

Sens. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnConservative groups defend tech from GOP crackdown Lawmakers weigh challenges in fighting robocalls Senators show deep skepticism on Space Force proposal MORE (R-Tenn.), Mike BraunMichael BraunOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — GOP senator issues stark warning to Republicans on health care | Rite Aid to stop selling e-cigs | CDC traces E.coli outbreak to ground beef The Hill's 12:30 Report: GOP wants Trump to keep them in the loop The Hill's Morning Report — Assange indictment adds new legal, political drama at DOJ MORE (R-Ind.), Kevin CramerKevin John CramerCain says he 'won't run away from criticism' in push for Fed seat Cain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed Conservatives urge Trump to stick with Moore for Fed MORE (R-N.D.), Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyHillicon Valley: Mueller report coming Thursday | YouTube adds 9/11 info to Notre Dame fire video | New details on case against Assange | Thousands sign petition to ban Trump on social media | Conservatives side with big tech in GOP fight Conservative groups defend tech from GOP crackdown Pelosi puts tech on notice with warning of 'new era' in regulation MORE (R-Mo.), Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenHillicon Valley — Presented by CTIA and America's wireless industry — Prosecutors used FISA warrant to get info on Huawei | Study finds discrimination in Facebook ads | Bezos retains voting control over ex-wife's Amazon stocks More than 30 Senate Dems ask Trump to reconsider Central American aid cuts Dem senators introduce bill to combat sexual harassment in STEM MORE (D-Nev.), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) and Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallySenate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller Trump gives nod to vulnerable GOP Sen. McSally with bill signing Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 MORE (R-Ariz.) were also sworn in. 

McSally lost her Senate bid against Sinema last year but was appointed to fill the seat that was formerly held by the late Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainEarth Day founder's daughter: Most Republican leaders believe in climate change in private Trump gives nod to vulnerable GOP Sen. McSally with bill signing Democrats need a 'celebrity' candidate — and it's not Biden or Sanders MORE (R-Ariz.). 

Her ascension, as well as Rosen and Sinema, will make Nevada and Arizona two of only a handful of states to be represented by two female senators.