Key GOP senator: Shutdown could last for the 'long haul'

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyOn The Money: Trump appeals to Supreme Court to keep tax returns from NY prosecutors | Pelosi says deal on new NAFTA 'imminent' | Mnuchin downplays shutdown threat | Trump hits Fed after Walmart boasts strong earnings Overnight Health Care: Cigarette smoking rates at new low | Spread of vaping illness slowing | Dems in Congress push to block Trump abortion rule Lawmakers aim for agreement on top-line spending by next week MORE (R-Ala.) warned reporters on Thursday that the partial government shutdown could last for the "long haul” with no clear way out in sight.

"I'm thinking we might be in for a long haul here. ... A long haul, in other words, I don't see any quick resolution to this," Shelby told reporters.

Shelby separately told reporters that the shutdown could last for "months and months." 

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The partial shutdown, which is impacting roughly 25 percent of the government, is already in its 13th day as Congress and the White House are stalemated over funding for President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy Official testifies that Bolton had 'one-on-one meeting' with Trump over Ukraine aid Louisiana governor wins re-election MORE's U.S.-Mexico border wall. 

"My personal preference [is] we already would have had all these bills done as you well know. ... Right now, let's see what happens. At the moment things don't look good, as far as reaching a resolution," Shelby added. 

Lawmakers are bracing for a lengthy shutdown, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy On The Money: Trump asks Supreme Court to block Dem subpoena for financial records | Kudlow 'very optimistic' for new NAFTA deal | House passes Ex-Im Bank bill opposed by Trump, McConnell Top House Democrats ask for review of DHS appointments MORE (R-Ky.) saying on Wednesday that he hoped to get a resolution in the "coming days and weeks."

Congressional leadership, including McConnell, met with Trump on Wednesday at the White House for a briefing on the border but made no progress toward an agreement. They are expected to meet again on Friday. 

House Democrats are poised to pass legislation later Thursday that would fully reopen the government. The package would fund the Department of Homeland Security through Feb. 8, while a second bill would fold in funding through Sept. 30 for the remaining six appropriations measures. 

But McConnell is pledging that he will not bring up that legislation for a vote because it does not have Trump's support. The Senate previously passed legislation to fund part of the government through Feb. 8 but got caught flatfooted when the president said he wouldn't support it. 

"Let me say this again, the Senate will not take up any proposal that does not have a real chance of passing this chamber and getting a presidential signature," McConnell reiterated on Thursday.