Poll: Sanders most popular senator, Flake least

Poll: Sanders most popular senator, Flake least

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersGun control: Campaigning vs. legislating Booker defends middle-ground health care approach: 'We're going to fight to get there' Sunday shows preview: Democratic candidates make the rounds after debate MORE (I-VT) remains Americans' most popular senator, while departing Arizona Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeFlake donates to Democratic sheriff being challenged by Arpaio in Arizona The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says US-China trade talks to resume, hails potential trade with Japan, UK Joe Arpaio to run for Maricopa County sheriff in 2020  MORE (R) is the least popular member of Congress's upper chamber.

A Morning Consult poll released Thursday found that Sanders enjoys the support of 64 percent of voters in his state.

The number is highest level recorded among any sitting senator and places him in the top spot for the 11th poll in a row, according to Morning Consult's pollsters. Just 28 percent of Vermont voters disapproved of the job the senator is doing, according to the poll. 

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His fellow Vermonter, Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyThe Hill's Morning Report — Biden steadies in third debate as top tier remains the same Overnight Defense: Dems grill Trump Army, Air Force picks | House chair subpoenas Trump Afghanistan negotiator | Trump officials release military aid to Ukraine On The Money: Trump delays increase in China tariffs until Oct. 15 | Treasury says US deficit topped trillion in 11 months | Defense spending bill advances over Democratic wall objections MORE (D), sat in 2nd place on the rankings list, with 62 percent support in the state. Leahy's approval numbers were tied with Wyoming Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoHouse votes to block drilling in Arctic refuge Lobbying World Meet the Democratic senator trying to negotiate gun control with Trump MORE (R) on the poll, though Barrasso faced slightly higher disapproval numbers.

Republican Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann Murkowski The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Overnight Energy: Trump administration to repeal waterway protections| House votes to block drilling in Arctic refuge| Administration takes key step to open Alaskan refuge to drilling by end of year Overnight Health Care: Juul's lobbying efforts fall short as Trump moves to ban flavored e-cigarettes | Facebook removes fact check from anti-abortion video after criticism | Poll: Most Democrats want presidential candidate who would build on ObamaCare MORE (Alaska.) and Cindy Hyde-Smith (MI) experienced the greatest drops in net support between Thursday's poll and a previous Morning Consult survey last year, dropping 10 percent approval in their home states in a matter of months.

Flake, who remained a vocal opponent of the president's style in the last year of his term saw the highest disapproval rating of any senator, 49 percent, while just 28 percent of Arizonans said he was doing a good job. Flake is reportedly considering a position at CBS News following his departure from the Senate this month.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellO'Rourke responds to Buttigieg's gun criticism: 'That calculation and fear is what got us here in the first place' Cicilline on Trump investigations versus legislation: 'We have to do both' The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation MORE (R-Ky.), previously the lowest-ranked senator on the poll, rose slightly to surpass both Flake and Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillEx-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity Ocasio-Cortez blasts NYT editor for suggesting Tlaib, Omar aren't representative of Midwest Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (D), who was defeated in November, in terms of popularity. 47 percent of voters in Kentucky say they disapprove of the job the top GOP senator is doing, compared to 38 percent who approve.

Morning Consult's poll was conducted between Oct. 1, 2018 and Dec. 31, 2018, and surveyed 416,853 registered voters across the country, based by state. The margin of error varied by senator, but did not exceed 5 percentage points.