Poll: Sanders most popular senator, Flake least

Poll: Sanders most popular senator, Flake least

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersButtigieg surges ahead of Iowa caucuses Biden leads among Latino Democrats in Texas, California On The Money: Trump appeals to Supreme Court to keep tax returns from NY prosecutors | Pelosi says deal on new NAFTA 'imminent' | Mnuchin downplays shutdown threat | Trump hits Fed after Walmart boasts strong earnings MORE (I-VT) remains Americans' most popular senator, while departing Arizona Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeLindsey Graham basks in the impeachment spotlight Kelly, McSally virtually tied in Arizona Senate race: poll The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Nareit — White House cheers Republicans for storming impeachment hearing MORE (R) is the least popular member of Congress's upper chamber.

A Morning Consult poll released Thursday found that Sanders enjoys the support of 64 percent of voters in his state.

The number is highest level recorded among any sitting senator and places him in the top spot for the 11th poll in a row, according to Morning Consult's pollsters. Just 28 percent of Vermont voters disapproved of the job the senator is doing, according to the poll. 

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His fellow Vermonter, Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyCongress hunts for path out of spending stalemate This week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Senators press NSA official over shuttered phone surveillance program MORE (D), sat in 2nd place on the rankings list, with 62 percent support in the state. Leahy's approval numbers were tied with Wyoming Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoCentrist Democrats seize on state election wins to rail against Warren's agenda Eleven GOP senators sign open letter backing Sessions's comeback bid GOP senators discuss impeachment with Trump after House vote MORE (R) on the poll, though Barrasso faced slightly higher disapproval numbers.

Republican Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiHillicon Valley: Federal inquiry opened into Google health data deal | Facebook reports millions of post takedowns | Microsoft shakes up privacy debate | Disney plus tops 10M sign-ups in first day Senators press FDA tobacco chief on status of vaping ban Federal inquiry opened into Google health data deal MORE (Alaska.) and Cindy Hyde-Smith (MI) experienced the greatest drops in net support between Thursday's poll and a previous Morning Consult survey last year, dropping 10 percent approval in their home states in a matter of months.

Flake, who remained a vocal opponent of the president's style in the last year of his term saw the highest disapproval rating of any senator, 49 percent, while just 28 percent of Arizonans said he was doing a good job. Flake is reportedly considering a position at CBS News following his departure from the Senate this month.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKavanaugh hailed by conservative gathering in first public speech since confirmation Overnight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families On The Money: Trump appeals to Supreme Court to keep tax returns from NY prosecutors | Pelosi says deal on new NAFTA 'imminent' | Mnuchin downplays shutdown threat | Trump hits Fed after Walmart boasts strong earnings MORE (R-Ky.), previously the lowest-ranked senator on the poll, rose slightly to surpass both Flake and Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillGOP senator rips into Pelosi at Trump rally: 'It must suck to be that dumb' Iranian attacks expose vulnerability of campaign email accounts Ex-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity MORE (D), who was defeated in November, in terms of popularity. 47 percent of voters in Kentucky say they disapprove of the job the top GOP senator is doing, compared to 38 percent who approve.

Morning Consult's poll was conducted between Oct. 1, 2018 and Dec. 31, 2018, and surveyed 416,853 registered voters across the country, based by state. The margin of error varied by senator, but did not exceed 5 percentage points.