Democrats will object to Senate adjourning amid shutdown

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats hit Scalia over LGBTQ rights Missouri Republican wins annual craft brewing competition for lawmakers Sen. Kaine: No reason for US to 'engage in military action to protect Saudi oil' MORE (D-Va.) plans to object to the Senate adjourning for the week Thursday afternoon amidst a 20-day government shutdown, according to Senate sources.

Kaine and his fellow Senate Democrats want to ratchet up pressure on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPatagonia says to shut stores for a few hours during Global Climate Strike Overnight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Pelosi unveils signature plan to lower drug prices | Trump says it's 'great to see' plan | Progressives pushing for changes On The Money: House votes to avert shutdown, fund government through November | Judge blocks California law requiring Trump tax returns | Senate panel approves three spending bills MORE (R-Ky.), who earlier in the day blocked a Senate vote on House-passed legislation to reopen government agencies not connected with the partisan standoff over the border wall.  

“Why would the Senate leave town this weekend before voting to reopen the government?!” Kaine tweeted on Thursday afternoon.

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“Countless federal workers aren't being paid. People are worrying about how to pay bills. Congress could act now to fix it if Mitch McConnell would just take up a bill. Let's stay here and do it!” he wrote. 

Kaine has told McConnell that he will object to any motion to adjourn the Senate for the week, something that is usually approved as a matter of routine on Thursday afternoons.  

Sources familiar with the floor standoff over adjourning for the week said Kaine has made McConnell “aware” and is now waiting for the GOP leader’s response. 

McConnell could either hold a vote to override Kaine’s objection or keep the Senate in session through the weekend although no votes would be expected, according to one senator briefed on the plan. 

The GOP leader angered Democrats earlier Thursday by refusing to allow a vote on a bundle of six bills funding government agencies that don’t have jurisdiction over the hot-button issue of border security. 

McConnell argued the House-passed legislation won’t go anywhere without President TrumpDonald John TrumpMarine unit in Florida reportedly pushing to hold annual ball at Trump property Giuliani clashes with CNN's Cuomo, calls him a 'sellout' and the 'enemy' Giuliani says 'of course' he asked Ukraine to look into Biden seconds after denying it MORE’s approval. 

“The last thing we need to do right now is trade pointless — absolutely pointless — show votes back and forth across the aisle,” he said. 

Negotiations appeared to collapse Thursday among a group of moderate Republicans led by Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamHouse Armed Services panel gets classified briefing on Saudi attacks America's newest comedy troupe: House GOP GOP group hits Pence over Trump alleged business conflicts MORE (R-S.C.) who had sought to find a compromise. 

“I think we're stuck. I just don't see a pathway forward,” Graham told reporters.  

Jordain Carney contributed.