Senate Dem: History will judge Trump harshly for 'inept' shutdown negotiations

Senate Dem: History will judge Trump harshly for 'inept' shutdown negotiations
© Greg Nash

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerDC train system losing 0k per day during government shutdown Leaders nix recess with no shutdown deal in sight Mobile providers at center of privacy storm MORE (D-Va.) on Sunday blasted President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump directed Cohen to lie to Congress about plans to build Trump Tower in Moscow during 2016 campaign: report DC train system losing 0k per day during government shutdown Senate Republicans eye rules change to speed Trump nominees MORE for his "inept negotiation" to bring an end to the ongoing partial government shutdown.

"I think history will show that Donald Trump, the supposed great dealmaker ... that business schools and management consultants will look back for years and say, this was the most inept negotiation," Warner said on CNN's "State of the Union.

"He boxed himself in a corner," Warner continued. "He didn't empower his negotiators, like the vice president or [Sens.] Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOvernight Defense: Trump unveils new missile defense plan | Dems express alarm | Shutdown hits Day 27 | Trump cancels Pelosi foreign trip | Senators offer bill to prevent NATO withdrawal McConnell blocks bill to reopen most of government On The Money: Shutdown Day 27 | Trump fires back at Pelosi by canceling her foreign travel | Dems blast 'petty' move | Trump also cancels delegation to Davos | House votes to disapprove of Trump lifting Russia sanction MORE [R-S.C.] or Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate Republicans eye rules change to speed Trump nominees McConnell blocks bill to reopen most of government Overnight Health Care: Thousands more migrant children may have been separated | Senate rejects bill to permanently ban federal funds for abortion | Women's March to lobby for 'Medicare for All' MORE [R-Ky.]. He's not allowed any win-win circumstance."

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Roughly 25 percent of the federal government has been shuttered for more than three weeks amid a standoff between Trump and congressional Democrats. The president has demanded more than $5 billion to fund his desired wall along the southern border, something Democrats have steadfastly opposed.

Negotiations between the two sides broke down last week, with few signs that a breakthrough is imminent.

Warner, the ranking member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, lamented the effect the shutdown has had on hundreds of thousands of federal workers who have been furloughed or forced to work without pay.

He argued the president should agree to reopen the government while lawmakers hash out an agreement on border security, echoing the stance held by most Democrats.