Senate Dem: History will judge Trump harshly for 'inept' shutdown negotiations

Senate Dem: History will judge Trump harshly for 'inept' shutdown negotiations
© Greg Nash

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerLive video of New Zealand shooting puts tech on defensive The Hill's Morning Report — Trump readies first veto after latest clash with Senate GOP Senate Dem warns against Manafort pardon after sentencing MORE (D-Va.) on Sunday blasted President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoint Chiefs chairman denies report that US is planning to keep 1K troops in Syria Kansas Department of Transportation calls Trump 'delusional communist' on Twitter Trump has privately voiced skepticism about driverless cars: report MORE for his "inept negotiation" to bring an end to the ongoing partial government shutdown.

"I think history will show that Donald Trump, the supposed great dealmaker ... that business schools and management consultants will look back for years and say, this was the most inept negotiation," Warner said on CNN's "State of the Union.

"He boxed himself in a corner," Warner continued. "He didn't empower his negotiators, like the vice president or [Sens.] Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamCNN anchor hits Trump: He didn't go to Vietnam 'until he was in his 70s' with 'Secret Service protection' Trump reignites criticism of McCain months after senator's death Graham defends McCain amid Trump attacks: 'Nothing about his service will ever be changed' MORE [R-S.C.] or Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellRepublicans up for reelection fear daylight with Trump Overnight Energy: Students around globe demand climate action | EPA bans consumer sales of deadly chemical in paint strippers | Green New Deal set for Senate vote The Hill's Morning Report — Trump readies first veto after latest clash with Senate GOP MORE [R-Ky.]. He's not allowed any win-win circumstance."

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Roughly 25 percent of the federal government has been shuttered for more than three weeks amid a standoff between Trump and congressional Democrats. The president has demanded more than $5 billion to fund his desired wall along the southern border, something Democrats have steadfastly opposed.

Negotiations between the two sides broke down last week, with few signs that a breakthrough is imminent.

Warner, the ranking member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, lamented the effect the shutdown has had on hundreds of thousands of federal workers who have been furloughed or forced to work without pay.

He argued the president should agree to reopen the government while lawmakers hash out an agreement on border security, echoing the stance held by most Democrats.