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Another GOP lawmaker calls on Steve King to resign over white supremacy comments

Rep. Chris StewartChris StewartGeorgia AG rejects prosecutor's request for Rayshard Brooks case to be reassigned House Republicans ask for briefing on threats keeping National Guard in DC READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results MORE (R-Utah) on Monday called on fellow GOP Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingRep. Gosar denounces 'white racism' after controversial appearance In Marjorie Taylor Greene, a glimpse of the future House votes to kick Greene off committees over embrace of conspiracy theories MORE (R-Iowa) to resign over recent comments he made about white supremacy and white nationalism. 

"I wish he’d resign, frankly," Stewart said on CNN's "Cuomo Prime Time." "He’s lost the trust and faith of his comrades. For the good of the party, for the good of the American people, I think it’s time for us to make a change."

His comments came just hours after GOP leaders in Congress stripped the Iowa congressman from any committee assignments in the new Congress.

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Stewart said that he "absolutely" agreed with the decision, adding that "without committee assignments ... [King] can’t do work in Congress."

"It’s not the first time that he’s said things that the party just cringes at and says 'what in the world,' " Stewart said, acknowledging that the GOP could have addressed King's past controversial comments.

King last week prompted outrage from Democratic and Republican lawmakers after he questioned why terms such as "white nationalist" and "white supremacist" were offensive in an interview with The New York Times. 

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?” King, who has served in Congress since 2003, asked. “Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?”
 
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyWatch live: McCarthy holds press briefing Biden vows to work with Congress to 'refine' voting rights bill House passes voting rights and elections reform bill MORE (R-Calif.) vowed to take action over the remarks on Sunday. He announced a day later that King would not serve on any committees in the new Congress.
 
King had been a member of the House Judiciary, Agriculture and Small Business committees. He had also served as chairman of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice in the last Congress. 
 
 
King has defended himself amid the backlash, saying he is not a white supremacist or white nationalist and was not suggesting either were acceptable in the interview. He said in a statement Monday that the GOP's decision to strip him of committee assignments was a "political decision that ignores the truth."