Barr calls for 'barrier system' on border

Barr calls for 'barrier system' on border
© Stefani Reynolds

President TrumpDonald John TrumpJustice Department preparing for Mueller report as soon as next week: reports Smollett lawyers declare 'Empire' star innocent Pelosi asks members to support resolution against emergency declaration MORE’s nominee for attorney general, William Barr, on Tuesday urged Congress to include border security funds in a bill to reopen the government, but left the door open for solutions other than President Trump's proposed border wall.

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSanders on Trump insult: Crazy that president 'is a racist, a sexist, a xenophobe and a fraud' Trump revives 'Crazy Bernie' nickname one day after Sanders enters race Betting against Bernie? Dems assess the risk MORE (D-Minn.) asked Barr during his nomination hearing what he would like to say to federal employees currently furloughed or working without pay during the partial government shutdown.

“I would like to see a deal reached where by Congress recognizes it's imperative to have border security,” Barr said, adding that he would like to see “common-sense barriers.”

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When Klobuchar noted that government funding bills from past years have included border security funds, Barr replied that the U.S. needs “money for border security right now.”

He went on to say that could mean walls, steel slats or other barriers, “whatever makes sense in different areas of the border.”

During an earlier exchange with Sen. Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstPush for paid family leave heats up ahead of 2020 Ivanka Trump to meet with GOP senators to discuss paid family leave legislation On The Money: Negotiators aiming to reach deal Monday night | Why border talks stalled | Treasury calls reports on dip in tax refunds 'misleading' | Cuomo, Trump to discuss SALT deduction cap MORE (R-Iowa), Barr had also called for "a barrier system on the border in order to get control of the border."

A standoff between House Democrats and Trump over the president's requested funding for his long-promised wall on the southern U.S. border has resulted in a now 25-day-long partial government shutdown, setting a new record.

The president had invited several moderate Democrats to the White House for lunch on Tuesday to try and strike a deal on their own that would fund both the government and the border wall.

But Democrats rejected the offer, with none attending the lunch. Several House Republicans were present at the White House meeting.

Senate Republicans on Tuesday also blocked a package of bills passed by the House that would reopen the government. 

--This report was updated at 1:25 p.m.