Senate rejects effort to block Trump on Russia sanctions

 
Senators voted 57-42 to end debate on the resolution, falling short of the 60 votes needed. If all Democrats supported the measure, they needed to win over 13 GOP senators. 
 
ADVERTISEMENT
GOP Sens. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanTrump getting tougher for Senate GOP to ignore Former NFL player challenging Boozman in Arkansas GOP primary Senate GOP opens door to earmarks MORE (Ark.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSunday shows preview: Delta concerns prompt CDC mask update; bipartisan infrastructure bill to face challenges in Senate Top Democrat: 'A lot of spin' coming from White House on infrastructure Bill would honor Ginsburg, O'Connor with statues at Capitol MORE (Maine), Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonUp next in the culture wars: Adding women to the draft Chuck Todd is dead wrong: Liberal bias defines modern journalism Ex-Rep. Abby Finkenauer running for Senate in Iowa MORE (Ark.), Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesSenate committee advances bipartisan energy infrastructure bill  Hillicon Valley: Lina Khan faces major FTC test | Amazon calls for her recusal | Warren taps commodities watchdog to probe Google Senators propose bill to help private sector defend against hackers MORE (Mont.), Cory GardnerCory GardnerEx-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm Biden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms MORE (Colo.), Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyBiden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet 228 Republican lawmakers urge Supreme Court to overrule Roe v. Wade Trio of Senate Republicans urges Supreme Court to overrule Roe v. Wade MORE (Mo.), John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.), Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallySchumer, Tim Scott lead as Senate fundraising pace heats up GOP group launches million ad campaign pressing Kelly on filibuster Democrats facing tough reelections back bipartisan infrastructure deal MORE (Ariz.), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranGraham: Bipartisan infrastructure pay-fors are insufficient This week: Democrats move forward with Jan. 6 probe Bipartisan senators ask CDC, TSA when they will update mask guidance for travelers MORE (Kan.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSenate holds sleepy Saturday session as negotiators finalize infrastructure deal Break glass in case of emergency — but not for climate change Democrats join GOP in pressuring Biden over China, virus origins MORE (Fla.) and Ben SasseBen SasseSasse calls China's Xi a 'coward' after Apple Daily arrest Defunct newspaper's senior editor arrested in Hong Kong Murkowski: Trump has 'threatened to do a lot' to those who stand up to him MORE (Neb.) voted to end debate on the resolution and advance it to a final vote.
 
The Trump administration announced plans late last month to relax sanctions on the three businesses — Rusal, EN+ and EuroSibEnergo — connected to Oleg Deripaska, an oligarch with ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin.
 
Under the 2017 sanctions bill, Democrats are able to force a vote on a resolution to block the administration from lifting the financial penalties.
 
 
He met with House Democrats last week and Senate Republicans on Tuesday to make the case that the sanctions against the three companies should be lifted because Deripaska’s ownership in the entities has fallen below 50 percent.
 
Mnuchin failed to sway enough senators to stop the resolution during an initial vote on Tuesday, where only a simple majority was needed. With Democrats holding 47 seats they had to win over at least four GOP senators on the first vote.
 
GOP senators who backed the resolution say they were unconvinced that Deripaska wouldn't maintain considerable sway over the companies under the Treasury Department's plan. 
 
"For all intents and purposes between his shares, the independent shares that the Russian state-owned bank control and various other individual shareholders, I still think he retains operational control," Rubio told reporters ahead of the initial vote. "So they’re going to have to do better.”
 
Kennedy added afterward that he voted to advance the resolution "because the principal involved is a gangster."
 
But Tuesday's 57-42 vote still left Democrats a few votes shy of being able to defeat the expected filibuster. Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerManchin on reported boos at Democratic luncheon: 'I heard a lot of nos' Wisconsin GOP quietly prepares Ron Johnson backup plans Senate infrastructure talks spill over into rare Sunday session MORE (D-N.Y.) urged Republicans to support the resolution to block the sanctions from being lifted if they believe that Putin is a "thug." 
 
"I'd like to make a direct appeal to my Republican friends who are wondering about this. … Do you believe America should take a tough line on Putin or do you think we should go easy on Putin and his cronies? From where I'm standing that's an easy choice," Schumer said. 
 
The vote in the Senate means that the Trump administration will be able to lift the Russia sanctions.
 
Though House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerProgressives camp outside Capitol to protest evictions House adjourns for recess without passing bill to extend federal eviction ban Top Democrat: 'A lot of spin' coming from White House on infrastructure MORE (D-Md.) said this week that he would introduce a resolution in that chamber to block the financial penalties from being nixed, both chambers would need to pass a resolution of disapproval by Thursday in order to block the administration from lifting sanctions.

House Democrats have asked for an extension from the Treasury Department, but Mnuchin declined to discuss the issue with reporters.
 
The Russia sanctions resolution is the first piece of legislation the Senate has debated since the start of the 116th Congress. Democrats have blocked a separate GOP foreign policy bill three times, arguing lawmakers should be focused on ending the partial government shutdown. 
 
Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session Manchin 'can't imagine' supporting change to filibuster for voting rights Biden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet MORE (R-Ky.) knocked Democrats on Wednesday accusing them of trying to blow up an agreement negotiated by the Trump administration in order to "make a political splash." 
 
"Political obstruction is their top priority. Everything else follows from that," McConnell said.