Trump tells GOP senators he’s sticking to Syria and Afghanistan pullout 

Trump tells GOP senators he’s sticking to Syria and Afghanistan pullout 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpForget the spin: Five unrefuted Mueller Report revelations Lara Trump: Merkel admitting migrants 'one of the worst things that ever happened to Germany' Financial satisfaction hits record high: survey MORE told a group of Republican senators Wednesday evening that he is sticking with his plan to draw down U.S. forces in Syria and Afghanistan, marking a new era in American foreign policy. 

Trump’s call to stick with his controversial decision to pull out of Syria and dramatically reduce forces in Afghanistan was praised by Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulDem super PAC campaign urges Republicans to back impeachment Booker, Harris have missed most Senate votes Trump vetoes measure ending US support for Saudi-led war in Yemen MORE (R-Ky.), a libertarian conservative who has long criticized American foreign policy for relying too much on military intervention. 

“I really am proud of the president for making an argument that really no president in recent history has made and that is that we’ve been at war too long in too many places and he’s really going to make a difference,” Paul said after meeting with Trump at the White House.

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Trump met one-on-one with Paul and then had a subsequent meeting with a larger group of Republican senators, including Paul and Sens. John CornynJohn CornynOn The Money: Fed pick Moore says he will drop out if he becomes a 'political problem' | Trump vows to fight 'all the subpoenas' | Deutsche Bank reportedly turning Trump records over to NY officials | Average tax refund down 2 percent Kushner saying immigration plan will be 'neutral' on legal admissions: report Cornyn campaign, Patton Oswalt trade jabs over comedian's support for Senate candidate MORE (Texas), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioDems plot aggressive post-Mueller moves, beginning with McGahn Senate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller Cuban negotiator says Trump's efforts to destabilize Cuba's government will fail MORE (Fla.), Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstTime to keep the promises for farmers to compete in energy Graham challenges Dems to walk the walk on impeachment McConnell pledges to be 'Grim Reaper' for progressive policies MORE (Iowa), Dan SullivanDaniel Scott Sullivan Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 Republicans defend McCain amid Trump attacks Overnight Defense: Senate rejects border emergency in rebuke to Trump | Acting Pentagon chief grilled on wall funding | Warren confronts chief over war fund budget MORE (Alaska) and Mike RoundsMarion (Mike) Michael RoundsGOP gets used to saying 'no' to Trump On The Money: Wells Fargo CEO steps down | Trump vows to keep funding for Special Olympics | House panel approves marijuana banking bill | Controversial Fed pick gains support in Senate Controversial Fed pick gains support in GOP Senate MORE (S.D.). 

“Not only is he following through with his Syria policy, I really do think there will be changes in Afghanistan as well,” Paul said. “If you look at the polling data for the American people, I think the American people are with the president and they’re tired, frankly, of both parties who are unwilling to stand up and say enough is enough.”

To back up his position, Trump pointed out how much U.S. taxpayers have spent on “gas stations, luxury hotels” and other projects in Afghanistan, Paul said. 

Asked about Trump’s Afghanistan policy, Paul said “in general the idea is we’re going to do things differently.”

“We’re not going to stay forever. The Afghans will need to step up. The Afghans will need to begin fighting their own wars and taking care of their country,” Paul said. “It’s not that we’ll do nothing. I think the president still will help them. I think we’ll still actually probably be there longer than I would like to be."

“But the president, I think, is willing to acknowledge that America’s longest war needs to come to a close and that we need to learn how to declare victory,” he added.

Trump shocked Republicans on Capitol Hill last month when he announced he would withdraw 2,000 troops from Syria, declaring in a video “We have won against ISIS,” referring to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, and “our boys, our young women, our men — they’re all coming back, and they’re coming back now.” 

On Wednesday, four Americans on a patrol were killed in Syria in a suicide bombing. ISIS took credit for the attack. 

National security adviser John Bolton contradicted the president earlier this month by saying during a trip to Israel that certain “objectives” must be met before troops leave Syria, and acknowledged that some ISIS forces remain active. 

Bolton said that ISIS must be destroyed and the safety of Kurdish allies guaranteed before U.S. forces leave. 

The Trump administration also announced last month that it would begin withdrawing about 7,000 troops from Afghanistan — about half the number deployed to the region. 

“I will tell you that if you look at his language and his tweets on endless war and you hear him talk about how long this has gone on, I think you’re really seeing one of the extraordinary things that people couldn’t figure out: How did Donald Trump get elected? It was because he doesn’t fit neatly in a box. He was a different kind of Republican who actually looked at the issues of war and said, ‘You know what? We ought to think of America first,’ ” Paul said. 

Paul declined to reveal any specifics Trump shared about his timelines for withdrawal.

“We talked extensively about Syria. He talked about how we will continue to make sure that ISIS is not a problem but at the same time, we will not just go into theater and stay forever. I think he was steadfast in that,” Paul said.