Democrats signal they'll reject Trump shutdown proposal

Democrats quickly rejected a proposal President TrumpDonald John TrumpAverage tax refunds down double-digits, IRS data shows White House warns Maduro as Venezuela orders partial closure of border with Colombia Trump administration directs 1,000 more troops to Mexican border MORE's to link border money to temporary protections for some undocumented immigrants as a path out of the partial government shutdown. 

Trump, wants $5.7 billion for the border wall in exchange for a three-year extension of protected status for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program recipients and some Temporary Protected Status holders. 

But Democratic aides, rank-and-file members and Democratic leadership are panning the proposal, making it unlikely Trump's pitch will break the weeks-long shutdown stalemate.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDon’t look for House GOP to defy Trump on border wall GOP Green New Deal stunt is a great deal for Democrats National emergency declaration — a legal fight Trump is likely to win MORE (D-N.Y.) said that Trump offering some protections for DACA and TPS recipients "in exchange for the wall is not a compromise but more hostage taking.”

Trump "keeps putting forward one-sided and ineffective remedies. There’s only way out: open up the government, Mr. President, and then Democrats and Republicans can have a civil discussion and come up with bipartisan solutions," Schumer added.

House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiKids confront Feinstein over Green New Deal Can progressives govern? Dems plan hearing on emergency declaration's impact on military MORE (D-Calif.), in a statement released shortly before Trump's speech, said the proposal couldn't pass the House and is a "non-starter."

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Democratic leadership was not consulted on the forthcoming White House proposal, according to two aides, who both noted that Democrats had previously rejected similar ideas.  

"Similar inadequate offers from the Administration were already rejected by Democrats. The BRIDGE Act does not fully protect Dreamers and is not a permanent solution," said a senior House Democratic aide. 

"This is not a compromise as it includes the same wasteful, ineffective $5.7 billion wall demand that shut down the government in the first place," the aide added. 

The BRIDGE Act, as previously introduced by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump says he'll '100 percent' veto measure blocking emergency declaration Overnight Defense: Dems tee up Tuesday vote against Trump's emergency declaration | GOP expects few defections | Trump doubles number of troops staying in Syria to 400 On The Money: Dems set Tuesday vote on Trump's emergency declaration | Most Republicans expected to back Trump | Senate plots to avoid fall shutdown drama | Powell heading before Congress MORE (R-S.C.) and Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinKids confront Feinstein over Green New Deal Senate plots to avoid fall shutdown brawl Overnight Energy: Trump ends talks with California on car emissions | Dems face tough vote on Green New Deal | Climate PAC backing Inslee in possible 2020 run MORE (D-Ill.), would allow "Dreamers" — immigrants who came to the country illegally as children — to get up to three years of "provisional protected presence" and the ability work in the United States. The proposal was meant to be a patch while Congress worked out a broader immigration deal. 

Durbin, in a statement ahead of Trump's speech, rejected using his bill as part of the solution to end the partial shutdown.

"I cannot support the proposed offer as reported and do not believe it can pass the Senate," Durbin said.

A second Democratic aide characterized the offer from Trump as "non-serious product." 

"Dems were not consulted on this and have rejected similar overtures previously. It’s clearly a non serious product of negotiations amongst [White House] staff to try to clean up messes the president created in the first place. [The President] is holding more people hostage for his wall," the aide said. 

Trump's offer comes on Day 29 of the partial government shutdown, which is impacting roughly a quarter of the government and forced approximately 800,000 federal employees to either be furloughed or work without pay. 

The White House has been trying to build a wedge between Democratic leadership and moderate members as they hunt for an exit strategy. Trump's proposal is the latest effort by the administration to try to put pressure on lawmakers after multiple polls have shown a majority of Americans blame the president for the shutdown. 

But rank-and-file members have shown no signs of breaking away from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) or Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), who have remained in close coordination throughout the weeks-long funding fight. 

The House senior Democratic aide added on Saturday that the White House offer "cannot pass the House or Senate." 

"The President must agree to re-open government and join Democrats to negotiate on border security measures that work and not an expensive and ineffective wall that the President promised Mexico would pay for," the aide added. 

Though Republicans control the Senate, they need at least seven Democratic senators to get their plan over a 60-vote filibuster. But Democrats showed no signs of breaking from Schumer, who has taken to the Senate floor repeatedly to urge Trump and Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKids confront Feinstein over Green New Deal Trump selects Kelly Craft for United Nations ambassador Union leader says Green New Deal would make infrastructure bill ‘absolutely impossible’ MORE (R-Ky.) to reopen the government before they negotiate on the border demands. 

Democratic senators, who appeared in the dark about what exactly Trump will offer, signaled on Saturday that they were standing by that demand. 

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal Overnight Defense: Trump declares border emergency | .6B in military construction funds to be used for wall | Trump believes Obama would have started war with North Korea | Pentagon delivers aid for Venezuelan migrants Kaine asks Shanahan if military families would be hurt by moving .6B for border wall MORE (D-Va.) said agreeing to take up a deal before the government is reopened "would accelerate the use of shutdown as a negotiating tool." 

"We've got to reopen the government first," he told The Hill. "If we can get government reopen I'm absolutely convinced that there's a deal here." 

Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal GOP Green New Deal stunt is a great deal for Democrats Trump defends using DOD funds on border wall: 'Some of the generals think that this is more important' MORE (D-Hawaii) added in a tweet that "if we open up the government I am open to negotiations. But if we reward this behavior it will never end, and the pain and chaos will be worse in the future."