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Sherrod Brown: Dems will lose if 'we have to choose' between speaking to progressive base and workers

Sherrod Brown: Dems will lose if 'we have to choose' between speaking to progressive base and workers
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Ohio Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownOn The Money: Democrats accuse Mnuchin of sabotaging economy in dispute with Fed | Trump administration proposal takes aim at bank pledges to avoid fossil fuel financing | JPMorgan: Economy will shrink in first quarter due to COVID-19 spike Democrats accuse Mnuchin of sabotaging economy in dispute with Fed McSally, staff asked to break up maskless photo op inside Capitol MORE (D) is urging the Democratic Party's eventual 2020 presidential nominee to reach out to all Americans and build a broad coalition instead of choosing to either speak to workers or progressives. 

In an interview with MSNBC's "Morning Joe," Brown warned that such a choice between working-class voters and progressive activists was a trap that spelled defeat for the party.

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"No matter who the presidential nominee is, it ... should be somebody whose centerpiece of the campaign is dignity of work," Brown said, riffing off of his "Dignity of Work" tour, which has brought the senator to several key primary states.

"I've seen so many national Democrats look at this as you either speak to the progressive base, or you speak to workers, working-class voters of all races. And if we have to choose between the two, we lose," he added to MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski.

"To win Ohio, to win the industrial Midwest, the heartland, and the Electoral College you've got to speak to the progressive base, to be sure, as I have my whole career, but you've got to talk to workers and live where they live."

Brown added that he is thinking "very seriously" of running in 2020, echoing his previous comments.

In an interview with The New York Times last year, Brown said that he and his wife "have been overwhelmed by the number of people that have come forward and said, ‘You’ve got to run. You have the right message. You come from the right state.’ ”

Brown won reelection in November by 7 points in a state President TrumpDonald John TrumpMinnesota certifies Biden victory Trump tells allies he plans to pardon Michael Flynn: report Republican John James concedes in Michigan Senate race MORE won by 8 points over Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonIntercept DC bureau chief says Biden picks are 'same people' from Obama years The Hill's 12:30 Report - Third vaccine candidate with 90% efficacy Biden won — so why did Trump's popularity hit its highest point ever? MORE (D) in 2016.

If he decides to run, the 66-year-old would join a crowded Democratic field that includes several of his colleagues in the Senate. Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisBiden teams to meet with Trump administration agencies Biden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members Ossoff, Warnock to knock on doors in runoff campaigns MORE (D-Calif.) announced her candidacy earlier this week and Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience On The Money: Biden to nominate Yellen for Treasury secretary | 'COVID cliff' looms | Democrats face pressure to back smaller stimulus MORE (D-Mass.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Social media responds to Harris making history: 'I feel like our ancestors are rejoicing' Ocasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever' MORE (D-N.Y.) have formed presidential exploratory committees.