Sherrod Brown: Dems will lose if 'we have to choose' between speaking to progressive base and workers

Sherrod Brown: Dems will lose if 'we have to choose' between speaking to progressive base and workers
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Ohio Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBank watchdogs approve rule to loosen ban on risky Wall Street trades Dayton mayor assigned extra security following verbal spat with Trump The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape MORE (D) is urging the Democratic Party's eventual 2020 presidential nominee to reach out to all Americans and build a broad coalition instead of choosing to either speak to workers or progressives. 

In an interview with MSNBC's "Morning Joe," Brown warned that such a choice between working-class voters and progressive activists was a trap that spelled defeat for the party.

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"No matter who the presidential nominee is, it ... should be somebody whose centerpiece of the campaign is dignity of work," Brown said, riffing off of his "Dignity of Work" tour, which has brought the senator to several key primary states.

"I've seen so many national Democrats look at this as you either speak to the progressive base, or you speak to workers, working-class voters of all races. And if we have to choose between the two, we lose," he added to MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski.

"To win Ohio, to win the industrial Midwest, the heartland, and the Electoral College you've got to speak to the progressive base, to be sure, as I have my whole career, but you've got to talk to workers and live where they live."

Brown added that he is thinking "very seriously" of running in 2020, echoing his previous comments.

In an interview with The New York Times last year, Brown said that he and his wife "have been overwhelmed by the number of people that have come forward and said, ‘You’ve got to run. You have the right message. You come from the right state.’ ”

Brown won reelection in November by 7 points in a state President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch To ward off recession, Trump should keep his mouth and smartphone shut Trump: 'Who is our bigger enemy,' Fed chief or Chinese leader? MORE won by 8 points over Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe road not taken: Another FBI failure involving the Clintons surfaces DHS cyber agency to prioritize election security, Chinese threats ABC chose a debate moderator who hates Trump MORE (D) in 2016.

If he decides to run, the 66-year-old would join a crowded Democratic field that includes several of his colleagues in the Senate. Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Gabbard, Steyer inch toward making third Democratic debate MORE (D-Calif.) announced her candidacy earlier this week and Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Keystone XL Pipeline gets nod from Nebraska Supreme Court MORE (D-Mass.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Gabbard, Steyer inch toward making third Democratic debate Gillibrand unveils mental health plan MORE (D-N.Y.) have formed presidential exploratory committees.