Third GOP senator to break with party, vote to reopen government without border wall funding

Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerEx-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm Biden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms MORE (R-Colo.) will break with President TrumpDonald TrumpRonny Jackson, former White House doctor, predicts Biden will resign McCarthy: Pelosi appointing members of Jan. 6 panel who share 'pre-conceived narrative' Kinzinger denounces 'lies and conspiracy theories' while accepting spot on Jan. 6 panel MORE and vote to reopen the government without funding for a border wall, his spokesman told The Denver Post editorial board. 

Gardner is one of three Republicans expected to vote to advance the "clean" funding bill. 

Gardner’s spokesman told the Post that the senator planned to vote for a “clean funding bill … with no border-security funding attached.”

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Gardner, who is up for reelection in 2020 in a state where Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe Shontel Brown gaining ground against Nina Turner in Ohio: poll Biden hits trail for McAuliffe in test of his political brand MORE defeated Trump in 2016, also intends to vote for a measure backed by Trump that the Senate will consider on Thursday. 

Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiWhy Biden's Interior Department isn't shutting down oil and gas Biden signs bill to bolster crime victims fund Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor MORE (R-Alaska) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTransit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal The Hill's Morning Report - Infrastructure vote fails; partisan feud erupts over Jan. 6 panel Senate falling behind on infrastructure MORE (R-Maine) are also expected to vote for the clean funding bill.

“I’m in the camp of being happy that we’re going to be going to the floor and having an opportunity to vote on proceeding to anything,” Murkowski said. “I’m not very optimistic at its chance of passage but we’ve got to get ourselves off of dead center here.” 

Collins has said she will vote to advance both bills, and Murkowski told The Washington Post that she would definitely vote to move forward with Trump's bill. 

Both of the measures the Senate is considering on Thursday are expected to fall short of the 60 votes needed to advance.  

The Senate will first take up Trump’s immigration-centric proposal, which asks for $5.7 billion in funding for the wall and would grant protections to some immigrants.

The second proposal involves a two-week stopgap funding bill to fund the government through Feb. 8 and allow time for lawmakers and Trump to reach a long-term deal. 

Updated on Jan. 24 at 9:04 a.m.