Dems strengthen hand in shutdown fight

Democrats strengthened their hand in the shutdown battle with Republicans and President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren: 'White supremacists pose a threat to the United States like any other terrorist group' National Enquirer paid 0,000 for Bezos texts: report Santorum: Trump should 'send emails to a therapist' instead of tweeting MORE after six GOP senators broke ranks and backed a bill to reopen the government that did not include money for Trump’s border wall.

Senate Majority Leader McConnell (R-Ky.) and Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerWhy we need to build gateway now Campaign to draft Democratic challenger to McConnell starts raising funds Schumer congratulates J. Lo and A-Rod, but says 'I'm never officiating a wedding again' MORE (N.Y.) are talking about a deal after Republicans sent the message to Vice President Pence at a Thursday lunch meeting that they want the shutdown to end as soon as possible.

A GOP source familiar with the meeting said McConnell told Pence “we should never have had a shutdown” and “they don’t work.”

“I don’t know how many times I’ve told you, there’s no education in the second kick of a mule,” the GOP source said, summarizing McConnell’s message to the vice president.

ADVERTISEMENT

Republican lawmakers hope Trump can win some concessions from Democrats, but they say the shutdown has become intolerable and they want to see a resolution as soon as possible.

“I reminded colleagues that I was feeling a very keen sense of urgency on this because Alaska has the highest number of federal workers that are impacted by the partial shutdown and we needed to get this open now,” Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiJuan Williams: Don't rule out impeaching Trump The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration Overnight Defense: Senate rejects border emergency in rebuke to Trump | Acting Pentagon chief grilled on wall funding | Warren confronts chief over war fund budget MORE (R-Alaska) said, recalling her comments at the meeting Pence attended.

“There was a lot of frustration expressed about the situation we find ourselves in,” said Sen. John CornynJohn CornynCornyn shrugs off Trump criticism of 'SNL' GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers Julian Castro hints at brother Joaquin's Senate run MORE (R-Texas), who was also present.

Pence asked the GOP conference to stay unified in opposition to the Democratic proposal to reopen the government without funding for the border wall, but the administration received a rebuke moments later when six Senate Republicans voted with Schumer.

The defectors were Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderWhite House proposes limits on student loan borrowing as part of higher education reforms The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration Trump issues first veto, warning of 'reckless' resolution MORE (Tenn.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts' Juan Williams: Don't rule out impeaching Trump MORE (Maine), Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerOvernight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts' Trump keeps tight grip on GOP MORE (Colo.), Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonThe Hill's 12:30 Report: O'Rourke jumps into 2020 fray Trump vows veto ahead of Senate vote on emergency declaration Senate to rebuke Trump on wall MORE (Ga.), Murkowski and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTrump keeps tight grip on GOP The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration Overnight Defense: Senate rejects border emergency in rebuke to Trump | Acting Pentagon chief grilled on wall funding | Warren confronts chief over war fund budget MORE (Utah.).

Collins later tweeted “this shutdown must come to an end” and called it her “top priority.” 

An Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll released Wednesday showed Trump’s approval rating at its lowest level in more than a year and a majority of Americans blaming him for the shutdown. 

Sixty percent of the survey’s respondents, including 54 percent of independents, said Trump has “a great deal” of responsibility for the shutdown.

Trump’s weakened position was reflected by his decision announced Wednesday evening to delay his State of the Union address until after the shutdown ends.

Only hours earlier, he defiantly insisted that he would find an alternative site for the annual address after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiHillicon Valley: Social media faces scrutiny after New Zealand attacks | YouTube removed 'tens of thousands' of shooting videos | DHS chief warns of state-backed cyber threats | House Dems plan April vote on net neutrality Republican senators who voted against Trump have no excuses Manchin says he won't support LGBTQ protection bill as written MORE (D-Calif.) denied him access to the House. 

With Trump and Pelosi barely on speaking terms, GOP lawmakers hope that they can drive a wedge between Senate and House Democrats and negotiate a deal separately with Schumer.

“To get a result here, we have to have the sides at the table,” said Senate Republican Whip John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSenators offer bipartisan bill to fix 'retail glitch' in GOP tax law GOP's Tillis comes under pressure for taking on Trump We need a national privacy law that respects the First Amendment MORE (S.D.), describing the Trump-Pelosi relationship as a “tough dynamic.”

“One way or another we got to get out of this,” he added. “This is a no-win for anybody.” 

“Right now it’s Schumer and McConnell,” Cornyn said after the vote. “There are a lot of different ways to skin the cat. It just depends on what Sen. Schumer and Sen. McConnell think they can agree to.”

Sen. Mike BraunMichael BraunOvernight Health Care - Presented by Kidney Care Partners - Dems renew push to fund gun violence research at CDC | New uncertainty over vaping crackdown | Lawmakers spar over Medicare drug prices Breaking my silence to protect life Senate approves border bill that prevents shutdown MORE (R-Ind.) said that Senate leaders need to help break the impasse between Trump and Pelosi.

“That’s what we’re hoping because we all want to get it done,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

McConnell and Schumer sat down for a meeting in the majority leader’s office Thursday afternoon after the six Republicans voted for a Democratic proposal to reopen the government until Feb. 8 without providing the $5.7 billion Trump has demanded for a border wall.

“We’re talking,” Schumer said as he emerged from McConnell’s office, refusing to share any details.

Democrats say the vote was a sign of their party’s growing leverage in the shutdown fight and predicted that GOP efforts to split Schumer and Pelosi will fail.

“They’re attached at the hip. He’s not going to do anything to undermine her,” said a Democratic senator who requested anonymity to comment on Schumer’s relationship with Pelosi.

Only one Democrat, centrist Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinManchin says he won't support LGBTQ protection bill as written Senators offer bipartisan bill to fix 'retail glitch' in GOP tax law Murkowski, Manchin call for 'responsible solutions' to climate change MORE (W.Va.), voted both for the GOP plan to reopen the government and to fill Trump’s funding request for the wall.

A second Democratic senator said Schumer feels he has all the political leverage in his talks with McConnell. 

“Chuck’s pretty confident about where the numbers are heading. I don’t think he feels a lot of pressure to negotiate. He feels that eventually [Republicans] are going to take a position to open the government,” said the source, who requested anonymity to discuss Schumer’s message to colleagues.

Just as Schumer predicted to his colleagues, a group of Republicans, including Murkowski, Collins, Gardner, Isakson and Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOverwhelming majority of voters want final Mueller report released: poll Bottom Line Pence traveling to SC for Graham reelection launch MORE (S.C.), introduced a clean three-week spending bill to reopen the government.

Their proposal does not include disaster relief funding that was attached to the Democratic stopgap measure that the six Republicans supported.

Graham briefed Trump on the proposal Thursday afternoon.

“I told him we’re talking about a three-week [continuing resolution] and all of us believe if we have three weeks with the government open that we could find a way forward to produce a bill that he would sign,” Graham said.

Trump released a statement shortly afterward asking Democrats to include what he called a “pro-rated down payment for the wall.”

But Democratic leaders have said for weeks now that they will not support any funding for a border wall even though they will agree to additional funds for other border security measures.

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisOvernight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts' Trump keeps tight grip on GOP MORE (R-N.C.), a Trump ally who faces a potentially tough reelection race in 2020, suggested that McConnell and Schumer could reach an agreement that spreads extra security funding to ports of entry in addition to the U.S.-Mexico border.

He said a deal could hinge on “better clarity on how the allocation of the border security would be programed, particularly with points of entry and a number of areas where we seem to have agreement.” 

Pelosi suggested strengthening infrastructure and roads at ports of entry when she delivered a response to Trump’s address to the nation on Jan. 8 asking Congress to fund the border wall. 

“We can build the infrastructure and roads at our ports of entry; we can install new technology to scan cars and trucks for drugs coming into our nation; we can hire the personnel we need to facilitate trade and immigration at the border,” she said.

House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) on Wednesday said Democrats could agree to as much as $5.7 billion in border security funding as long as it’s not included for a physical wall. 

Instead, he said Democrats could back a “smart wall.”

A Senate Republican aide said GOP lawmakers could offer extra money for Democratic priorities, such as for schools in economically depressed urban areas, as a trade-off for a down payment on the wall or a bump up in general border security funding. 

Jordain Carney contributed.