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Schumer says Congress should make sure shutdown 'never happens again'

Schumer says Congress should make sure shutdown 'never happens again'
© Stefani Reynolds

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerCowboys for Trump founder arrested following Capitol riot Graham pushes Schumer for vote to dismiss impeachment article Biden and the new Congress must protect Americans from utility shutoffs MORE (D-N.Y.) said Sunday he wants to prevent future government shutdowns in the event of funding lapses.

"Now that the shutdown is over, we should roll up our sleeves and make sure it never happens again," Schumer said at a Manhattan news conference, according to Newsday.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSocial media posts, cellphone data aid law enforcement investigations into riots 'Almost Heaven, West Virginia' — Joe Manchin and a 50-50 Senate Confirmation hearing for Biden's DNI pick postponed MORE (D-Va.) last week introduced a bill called The Stop Stupidity (Shutdowns Transferring Unnecessary Pain and Inflicting Damage In The Coming Years) Act, which would automatically renew funding for all aspects of government, except for the legislative branch and president’s office, at the same level as the previous year.

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Senate Republicans, led by Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGraham pushes Schumer for vote to dismiss impeachment article Impeachment trial tests Trump's grip on Senate GOP GOP in bind over Trump as corporate donations freeze MORE (R-Ohio), have also introduced similar legislation, the End Government Shutdowns Act.

Schumer has not taken a position on specific legislation.

White House acting chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyTrump allies, Washington insiders helped plan rallies before Capitol breach: reports Author: Meadows is history's worst White House chief of staff The Hill's Morning Report - House to impeach Trump this week MORE said Sunday on CBS's "Face the Nation" that President TrumpDonald TrumpGiuliani used provisional ballot to vote in 2020 election, same method he disparaged in fighting to overturn results Trump gets lowest job approval rating in final days as president Fox News' DC managing editor Bill Sammon to retire MORE is willing to shut down the government again in three weeks should lawmakers not come to a satisfactory agreement on border security funding.

The president on Friday signed a bill to fund the government for three weeks, ending a partial government shutdown that had lasted 35 days. The measure did not include money for a wall along the southern border, but provided the opportunity for a bipartisan conference of lawmakers to negotiate border security funding.

Trump said in an interview published Sunday with The Wall Street Journal that he views the chances of a potential deal among lawmakers as "less than 50-50."

Updated at 6:10 p.m.