Clinton backers say she won’t be Dem pick for 2020 nomination

Democratic lawmakers who strongly backed Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Nadler: I don't understand why Mueller didn't charge Donald Trump Jr., others in Trump Tower meeting Kellyanne Conway: Mueller didn't need to use the word 'exoneration' in report MORE in 2016 say they are confident she won’t be their party’s nominee in 2020. 

Over the last couple of months, Clinton hasn’t publicly ruled out another White House bid — which has startled some Democrats. 

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Clinton quickly locked down support of most of the Democratic establishment in the 2016 election cycle and enjoyed nearly unanimous support among Democrats on Capitol Hill, but former allies warn that support has mostly evaporated. Clinton, who won more of the popular vote than President TrumpDonald John TrumpThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Obama condemns attacks in Sri Lanka as 'an attack on humanity' Schiff rips Conway's 'display of alternative facts' on Russian election interference MORE and would be viewed as one of the most qualified candidates in the field if she ran, has told friends that she is not closing the door on a 2020 run, according to a report from veteran CNN reporter Jeff Zeleny over the weekend. 

In October, Clinton said, “I’d like to be president.” After being pressed on whether she was seriously considering a bid, Clinton responded like other possible 2020 candidates — “I’m not even going to think about it until we get through this [midterm] election.” 

Democratic lawmakers, however, are skeptical that Clinton will launch a third presidential bid.  

“I haven’t heard a serious suggestion from her or her husband about that. but I think there are plenty of candidates. I think her time has passed,” said Senate Democratic Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDurbin calls Mueller report findings on Trump team 'troubling' Congress opens door to fraught immigration talks McConnell: 'Past time' for immigration-border security deal MORE (Ill.), who endorsed Clinton in 2016. “She can do what she wishes, but I would hope that we would look for a new candidate.”

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Sen. Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichNew Mexico senators request probe into militia group detaining migrants Lawmakers, tech set for clash over AI Why America needs the ability to track enemy missiles from space MORE (D-N.M.) said “it’s time to let a new generation of leadership rise.”

“We have great options,” he said of younger-generation Democrats who are making presidential runs, such as Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' Tulsi Gabbard fundraises off 4/20: 'Appalls me' that feds consider marijuana illegal MORE (Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' 2020 Dems ratchet up anti-corporate talk in bid to woo unions MORE (N.Y.), or eyeing them, like Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' 2020 Dems ratchet up anti-corporate talk in bid to woo unions MORE (N.J.) and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (Texas), among many others. 

“I’m excited by the number of fresh faces we have who are looking at 2020,” he added.  

Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) Tester20 Dems demand no more money for ICE agents, Trump wall Overnight Energy: Bipartisan Senate group seeks more funding for carbon capture technology | Dems want documents on Interior pick's lobbying work | Officials push to produce more electric vehicle batteries in US Bipartisan senators want 'highest possible' funding for carbon capture technology MORE (D-Mont.), who also endorsed Clinton in 2016 as “the most qualified person on the ballot to unite our nation,” warned the environment will be much different in 2020.  

“Is she running as a Democrat or is she going to go the coffee man’s way,” he joked, referring to former Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz, who has come under intense fire from Democrats for announcing that he is considering running in 2020 as an independent candidate. 

Tester cautioned “it will be clear” that Clinton’s “viability” will be “different than it was four years ago. ... It’s just tough.”

Other Democrats say it’s a free country and that Clinton is within her right to run again. 

Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyOnly four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates More than 30 Senate Dems ask Trump to reconsider Central American aid cuts Long-shot goal of nixing Electoral College picks up steam MORE (D-Ore.), who backed Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Wage growth shaping up as key 2020 factor for Trump Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' MORE (I-Vt.) in the 2016 Democratic primary, said “anybody who thinks they have a role to play in the 2020 conversation should consider being part of it.”
Gillibrand, who announced her own presidential campaign earlier this month, said, “I think anybody who wants to run should run.” 

Privately, Democratic senators say nominating Clinton in 2020 would be a big mistake because of her high unfavorable rating after decades of battling the Republican Party. More voters backed Trump in 2016 because they disliked Clinton than vice versa, according to exit polling of the race.

“Last time we all picked arguably the worst candidate we could have picked,” said one Democratic senator who requested anonymity, admitting that party leaders underestimated Clinton’s negatives ahead of the contest with Trump. 

A second Democratic senator who requested anonymity to discuss Clinton’s prospects frankly warned that “the Clintons have a lot of baggage.”

“I can’t believe there would be much support in the party,” the lawmaker added. But the source speculated the CNN report “is probably true” that Clinton is still harboring White House ambitions because “she’s kind of throwing her name out.”
Clinton has defended women candidates and helped lead the pushback against punditry assessing the “likability of female candidates.” Promoting a bill protecting reproductive rights at an event in Albany, N.Y., earlier this month, Clinton noted, “There’s been a lot of talk recently about whether our country is ready for women leaders.” In November, she argued that loose border control has fueled right-wing politics in Europe, warning in an interview with The Guardian that “if we don’t deal with the migration issue it will continue to roil the body politic.” 

A spokesman for Clinton did not respond to a request for comment and two former advisers to her 2016 campaign did not respond to messages.

Some Democratic aides on Capitol Hill say they are confident that Clinton won’t run in 2020 and point to efforts by former Clinton advisers to knock down the CNN report that she’s considering another White House bid. 

NBC’s Alex Seitz-Wald reported Monday that “people close” to Clinton “are downplaying” her willingness to run another race and cited a “source close to Clinton” who said it “seems like supportive chatter from people and not much more than that.” 

Neera Tanden, a longtime senior Clinton adviser, said rumors of Clinton’s interest in returning to politics often serve as nothing more than a mean-spirited excuse to bash her. “Every few months, someone whispers to a reporter that Hillary has not signed in blood that she won’t run and we get this media swarm which is an opportunity to drag her,” she tweeted Monday. Tanden did not respond to a request for comment. 

But another former Clinton adviser, Doug Schoen, backed up CNN’s report from the weekend during an appearance on Fox Nation’s “Liberty File.” 

Asked about Clinton keeping her options open for another presidential run, he said, “I think that’s been her position for a while.” He claims that Clinton could have a path to victory if the Democratic electorate is fractured among a wide field of candidates. 

“Her thinking … very simply is if you have 10 or 15 candidates, she can get a minority of the vote. Win a substantial number of minorities, arguably, and get the nomination that way and have another rematch with Donald Trump,” Schoen said. 
Mark Penn, who served as Clinton’s chief pollster in the 2008 presidential election, predicted in a Wall Street Journal op-ed published on Nov. 11 that “Hillary will run again.” 

“More than 30 years in the making, this new version of Mrs. Clinton, when she runs for president in 2020, will come full circle — back to the universal-health-care-promoting progressive firebrand of 1994,” he wrote in the piece co-authored with former Manhattan Borough President Andrew Stein.

“True to her name, Mrs. Clinton will fight this out until the last dog dies. She won’t let a little thing like two stunning defeats stand in the way of her claim to the White House,” he predicted. 

But that vision isn’t shared by many of her former supporters on Capitol Hill. They say they’re ready for a new batch of leaders. 

“We’re going to have lots of great candidates, lots of new ideas, lots of people getting involved and that’s a good thing for the party,” said Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne Shaheen Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 William Barr is right to investigate FBI actions during 2016 campaign Trolling of Bill Barr shows how language is twisted to politics MORE (D), whose home state of New Hampshire hosts the nation’s first primary next year.