Republicans want Trump to keep out of border talks

Republicans are urging President TrumpDonald John TrumpEsper sidesteps question on whether he aligns more with Mattis or Trump Warren embraces Thiel label: 'Good' As tensions escalate, US must intensify pressure on Iran and the IAEA MORE to step back, for now, from the negotiations to prevent a second partial government shutdown.

The president is offering a running, real-time commentary about the conference committee tasked with breaking the months-long stalemate between the White House and congressional Democrats, frustrating lawmakers who worry Trump is complicating already difficult talks.

In a tweet on Thursday, Trump warned that Republicans on the panel might be “wasting their time.”

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He later added during a rollercoaster White House appearance before reporters that he “won’t even look” at a deal that didn’t including funding for his wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

GOP senators say Trump should stick to the sidelines and let the bipartisan group of appropriators, known for their ability to cut deals, get to work.

“I think it would be more worthwhile and effective if the president would allow some space for these negotiations to occur and not be doing commentary at this point,” said Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP put on the back foot by Trump's race storm GOP senator: 'Outrageous' to say Trump's tweets about Democratic congresswomen are racist Fox personalities blast Trump's remarks MORE (R-Maine).

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneGOP struggles to find backup plan for avoiding debt default GOP frets over nightmare scenario for Senate primaries High anxiety hits Senate over raising debt ceiling MORE (S.D.), the No. 2 Senate Republican, said he hoped Trump’s skepticism was “wrong” and that the president was just “trying to set expectations low.”

Asked if the president should give negotiators some space, Thune added: “I think it’s good to let them do their thing and see what they can come up with.”

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiFinally, GOP lawmakers prove conservation and conservatism go hand-in-hand Alaska political mess has legislators divided over meeting place Republican lawmakers on why they haven't read Mueller report: 'Tedious' and 'what's the point?' MORE (R-Alaska), asked about Trump’s belief that Republicans are wasting their time, said she was trying to “urge success” and that the conference committee should “be empowered to do their work.”

The 17 lawmakers negotiating a possible deal have their work cut out for them.

They have little time to reach an agreement, and must negotiate in the shadow of Trump and Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse Democrat pushes for censuring Trump in closed-door meeting Trump: I don't have a racist bone in my body Ocasio-Cortez responds to fresh criticism from Trump MORE (D-Calif.).

Those two political giants, who had several standoffs during the shutdown that ended last weekend, held dueling press outings on Thursday.

Pelosi put down Democratic goalposts for the negotiations, telling reporters that “there's not going to be any wall money in the legislation.” But she also signaled a new openness to “some infrastructure,” including new fencing or other barriers.

Trump said he would not accept a deal without money for his prized wall, accused Pelosi of “playing games” and jabbed at the conference committee, saying, “I don’t think they’re going to make a deal.”

Democrats have been wary of trying to negotiate with the president, arguing that he is not reliable. Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerNYT: Don't make Acosta a political martyr Charities say they never received donations touted by Jeffrey Epstein: report Schumer to donate Epstein campaign contributions to groups fighting sexual violence MORE (D-N.Y.), reviving a favored quotation, told reporters this week that trying to reach an agreement with Trump is like “negotiating with Jell-o.”

“When the president has stayed out of it, when the president has given Congress room, we have been repeatedly able to forge bipartisan agreements. ... When the president injects ... partisan demands, negotiations tends to fall apart,” Schumer said separately during a Senate floor speech.

The conference committee has until Feb. 15 to clinch a deal that resolves the border fight and funds a quarter of the government, including the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The 17-member panel met for the first time Wednesday.

Absent an agreement, there could be a second partial government shutdown or Trump could declare a national emergency to build his wall — an option he has kept on the table despite fierce pushback from lawmakers.

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyGOP struggles to find backup plan for avoiding debt default GOP balks at White House push for standalone vote on debt ceiling Lawmakers concede they might have to pass a dreaded 'CR' MORE (R-Ala.), a member of the conference committee and chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, said his goal was to reach a deal and that it would probably be easier if the task were left to the 17 lawmakers.  

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynGOP struggles to find backup plan for avoiding debt default Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand On The Money: Mnuchin warns US could hit debt limit in early September | Acosta out as Labor chief | Trump pitches trade deal in Wisconsin | FTC reportedly settles with Facebook for B fine MORE (R-Texas), a member of GOP leadership, added that “the Constitution commits appropriations to the Congress, and I think we ought to do our job.”

But senators acknowledged that whatever agreement they come up with, Trump will ultimately have to sign.

“There’s no question that their opinion matters,” Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) said of the White House.

Asked if it would be easier to get a deal if Trump wasn’t tweeting about the committee, Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenMcConnell ups pressure on White House to get a budget deal Senators introduce bill to prevent border agency from selling personal data Overnight Energy: Bipartisan Senate group seeks more funding for carbon capture technology | Dems want documents on Interior pick's lobbying work | Officials push to produce more electric vehicle batteries in US MORE (R-N.D.) said that “everybody’s going to continue to comment on this process. Everybody’s going to continue to put forward ideas. That’s how it works around here.”

Keeping Trump from continuously offering public commentary, some senators acknowledged, was a pipe dream.  

Kennedy mused that Trump was just “saying out loud what a lot of people on Capitol Hill are thinking — this may be a total waste of time.”

Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterTrump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand The Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi looks to squash fight with progressives Democratic senators want candidates to take Swalwell's hint and drop out MORE (D-Mont.), a member of the conference committee, started laughing when he was asked if Pelosi and Trump should give them room to negotiate.

“I would like to have them just leave it up to me. But I have a notion that they’re going to want to [weigh in] and I think that’s the way it needs to be. We need to figure out what their input is and work off of that,” Tester said.

Cornyn, asked if Trump should stop tweeting about the conference committee, quipped: “Oh I don’t think the president wants anybody’s advice.”