Bernie Sanders to deliver his own State of the Union response

Bernie Sanders to deliver his own State of the Union response

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: Unhappy voters could deliver political shocks beyond Trump Democratic senator will introduce bill mandating social distancing on flights after flying on packed plane Neil Young opposes use of his music at Trump Mount Rushmore event: 'I stand in solidarity with the Lakota Sioux' MORE (I-Vt.) will deliver his own response to President TrumpDonald John TrumpProtesters tear down statue of Christopher Columbus in Baltimore 'Independence Day' star Bill Pullman urges Americans to wear a 'freedom mask' in July 4 PSA Protesters burn American flag outside White House after Trump's July Fourth address MORE's speech to Congress on Tuesday for the third year running.

The senator's office confirmed to The Hill that his response will follow Trump's State of the Union address as well as the Democratic rebuttal and be streamed on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

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Sanders has made responding to Trump's televised addresses a habit, delivering a response to the president's speech on border security last month in addition to responding to previous speeches to Congress.

Sanders, who is an independent but caucuses with Democrats, will be delivering his response after former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams delivers the official Democratic Party response.

California Attorney General Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraTrump's use of Pentagon funds for US-Mexico border wall illegal, court rules LA coroner walks back suicide ruling in hanging death of Robert Fuller amid backlash Supreme Court denies petition to hear 'sanctuary' case MORE (D) will also give the Spanish-language Democratic response.

Sanders is in the process of deciding whether to pursue a 2020 presidential bid. He has consistently placed toward the top of national polls after challenging eventual Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocrats try to turn now into November The Memo: Unhappy voters could deliver political shocks beyond Trump On The Trail: Trump, coronavirus fuel unprecedented voter enthusiasm MORE in 2016. 

If he chooses to run, Sanders will join a primary field that could see as many as 30 candidates run in 2020.

His colleagues Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden chips away at Trump's fundraising advantage Warnock raises almost M in Georgia Senate race in second quarter The Hill's Morning Report - Trump lays low as approval hits 18-month low MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisJaime Harrison seeks to convince Democrats he can take down Lindsey Graham Senators push foreign media to disclose if they are registered as foreign agents Warnock raises almost M in Georgia Senate race in second quarter MORE (D-Calif.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSenators push foreign media to disclose if they are registered as foreign agents Joe Biden must release the results of his cognitive tests — voters need to know GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday MORE (D-N.J.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocratic lawmakers call for expanding, enshrining LGBTQ rights The Hill's 12:30 Report: Fauci 'aspirationally hopeful' of a vaccine by winter The Hill's Morning Report - Officials crack down as COVID-19 cases soar MORE (D-N.Y.) have already announced they intend to run.

-Updated 7:55 p.m.