Negotiators poised to meet for shutdown talks

Key negotiators seeking to avoid a new partial government shutdown are poised to meet at 3:30 p.m. Monday after talks derailed over the weekend.

A Senate aide confirmed that Sens. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyWary GOP eyes Meadows shift from brick-thrower to dealmaker On The Money: Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire | Jobs report poised to light fire under COVID-19 talks | Tax preparers warn unemployment recipients could owe IRS Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire MORE (R-Ala.) and Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahySenate Democrats demand answers on migrant child trafficking during pandemic Yates spars with GOP at testy hearing Vermont has a chance to show how bipartisanship can tackle systemic racism MORE (D-Vt.) and Reps. Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyGovernors air frustrations with Trump on unemployment plans It's past time to be rid of the legacy of Jesse Helms Helping our seniors before it's too late MORE (D-N.Y.) and Kay GrangerNorvell (Kay) Kay GrangerHelping our seniors before it's too late House approves .3 trillion spending package for 2021 GOP lawmakers comply with Pelosi's mask mandate for House floor MORE (R-Texas) will meet on Monday afternoon to try to break the stalemate.

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The meeting comes days ahead of Congress's Feb. 15 deadline to clinch a deal on President TrumpDonald John TrumpTeachers union launches 0K ad buy calling for education funding in relief bill FDA head pledges 'we will not cut corners' on coronavirus vaccine Let our values drive COVID-19 liability protection MORE's U.S.-Mexico border wall and funding for roughly a quarter of the federal government, including the Department of Homeland Security.

If they can't get a larger agreement by then, Congress would need to pass a continuing resolution to punt the border fight and prevent a second lapse in funding in as many months.

Lawmakers left Washington late last week relatively optimistic they would be able to get a deal by Friday, the date established by a three-week stopgap measure that Trump signed into law last month, ending the longest shutdown in U.S. history.

But talks remain stuck on two key issues: the amount of physical barrier funding and the number of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention beds to be funded.

Shelby, speaking Sunday, acknowledged that talks were stalemated and put the chances of getting a deal at 50-50.

“We're hoping we can get there. But we've got to get fluid again. We've got to start movement,” Shelby said on “Fox News Sunday.”

Without specifically mentioning Democrats, Shelby released a letter on Monday from sheriffs groups warning against capping the number of ICE detention beds.

Democrats acknowledged on Sunday that they had proposed a cap on the number of ICE detention beds, arguing it would force the Trump administration to focus on “serious criminals” and was in line with numbers from the Obama administration.

“The Trump Admin has been tearing communities apart with its cruel immigration policies. A cap on ICE detention beds will force the Trump Admin to prioritize deportation for criminals and people posing real security threats, not law-abiding immigrants contributing to our country,” Rep. Lucille Roybal-AllardLucille Roybal-AllardHispanic Caucus asks for Department of Labor meeting on COVID in meatpacking plants Democrats may bring DHS bill to House floor Texas Democrat proposes legislation requiring masks in federal facilities MORE (D-Calif.) said in a tweet.