Sanders: 'Not crazy' about nixing the Senate filibuster

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersWarren embraces Thiel label: 'Good' Sanders slams decision not to charge officer who killed Eric Garner Cardi B says voters let Bernie Sanders down MORE (I-Vt.) said he is "not crazy" about nixing the legislative filibuster, despite calls from some progressives to get rid of the 60-vote hurdle. 
 
"I'm not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster," Sanders said during an interview with CBS News's "This Morning." 
 
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Sanders, appearing to pivot away from the topic of the filibuster, added that the "problem" with Washington, D.C., is that there is a system dominated "by wealthy campaign contributors." 
 
"I'm not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster. I think the problem is, people often talk about the lack of comity and the anger. The real issue is that you have in Washington a system which is dominated in Washington by wealthy campaign contributors," he said. 
 
Talk of getting rid of the legislative filibuster if Democrats retake the Senate in 2020 kicked into high gear late last month after Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren embraces Thiel label: 'Good' Trump says administration will 'take a look' after Thiel raises concerns about Google, China Thiel calls Warren the most 'dangerous' Democratic candidate MORE (D-Mass.) told Politico that nixing the 60-vote legislative filibuster should be “on the table” if Democrats win back the chamber and the White House in the 2020 elections.  
 
A coalition of progressive groups are trying to make the the legislative filibuster a wedge issue in the primary, where several Democratic senators are running for their party's nomination. 
 
They argue that the myriad of big-idea proposals currently being pitched by progressives — including "Medicare for all" and the Green New Deal — would be dead on arrival in the Senate if 60 votes are required. 
 
But several Democratic senators, including Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinProblem Solvers Caucus co-chair calls Trump comments about progressive congresswomen 'totally unacceptable' Trump's tweets unify a fractured Democratic Party Sunday shows - Immigration raids dominate MORE (Ill.), the No. 2 Democrat in the chamber, are wary or outright opposed to nixing the filibuster, arguing it would turn the Senate into the House, defang the minority and freeze any hope of bipartisanship. 
 
 
Twenty-eight Democrats currently in the Senate signed a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet GOP put on the back foot by Trump's race storm Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA —Biden unveils health care plan | Proposal pitches subsidies, public option | Biden vows if you like your health insurance, 'you can keep it' | Sanders protests planned Philadelphia hospital closure MORE (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerNYT: Don't make Acosta a political martyr Charities say they never received donations touted by Jeffrey Epstein: report Schumer to donate Epstein campaign contributions to groups fighting sexual violence MORE (D-N.Y.) in 2017, after Republicans got rid of the 60-vote filibuster for Supreme Court nominees, supporting keeping the legislative filibuster.