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Sanders: 'Not crazy' about nixing the Senate filibuster

 
"I'm not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster," Sanders said during an interview with CBS News's "This Morning." 
 
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Sanders, appearing to pivot away from the topic of the filibuster, added that the "problem" with Washington, D.C., is that there is a system dominated "by wealthy campaign contributors." 
 
"I'm not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster. I think the problem is, people often talk about the lack of comity and the anger. The real issue is that you have in Washington a system which is dominated in Washington by wealthy campaign contributors," he said. 
 
Talk of getting rid of the legislative filibuster if Democrats retake the Senate in 2020 kicked into high gear late last month after Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSchumer vows to advance two-pronged infrastructure plan next month Overnight Health Care: CDC panel meets on vaccines and heart inflammation | Health officials emphasize vaccine is safe | Judge rules Missouri doesn't have to implement Medicaid expansion Democrats urge Biden to extend moratorium on student loan payments MORE (D-Mass.) told Politico that nixing the 60-vote legislative filibuster should be “on the table” if Democrats win back the chamber and the White House in the 2020 elections.  
 
A coalition of progressive groups are trying to make the the legislative filibuster a wedge issue in the primary, where several Democratic senators are running for their party's nomination. 
 
They argue that the myriad of big-idea proposals currently being pitched by progressives — including "Medicare for all" and the Green New Deal — would be dead on arrival in the Senate if 60 votes are required. 
 
But several Democratic senators, including Sen. Dick DurbinDick Durbin'Killibuster': Democratic angst grows as filibuster threatens agenda Biden administration to back bill ending crack, powder cocaine sentence disparity: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats await Manchin decision on voting rights bill MORE (Ill.), the No. 2 Democrat in the chamber, are wary or outright opposed to nixing the filibuster, arguing it would turn the Senate into the House, defang the minority and freeze any hope of bipartisanship.