Sanders: 'Not crazy' about nixing the Senate filibuster

 
"I'm not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster," Sanders said during an interview with CBS News's "This Morning." 
 
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Sanders, appearing to pivot away from the topic of the filibuster, added that the "problem" with Washington, D.C., is that there is a system dominated "by wealthy campaign contributors." 
 
"I'm not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster. I think the problem is, people often talk about the lack of comity and the anger. The real issue is that you have in Washington a system which is dominated in Washington by wealthy campaign contributors," he said. 
 
Talk of getting rid of the legislative filibuster if Democrats retake the Senate in 2020 kicked into high gear late last month after Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenArtist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE (D-Mass.) told Politico that nixing the 60-vote legislative filibuster should be “on the table” if Democrats win back the chamber and the White House in the 2020 elections.  
 
A coalition of progressive groups are trying to make the the legislative filibuster a wedge issue in the primary, where several Democratic senators are running for their party's nomination. 
 
They argue that the myriad of big-idea proposals currently being pitched by progressives — including "Medicare for all" and the Green New Deal — would be dead on arrival in the Senate if 60 votes are required. 
 
But several Democratic senators, including Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSupreme Court poised to hear first major gun case in a decade Protecting the future of student data privacy: The time to act is now Overnight Health Care: Crunch time for Congress on surprise medical bills | CDC confirms 47 vaping-related deaths | Massachusetts passes flavored tobacco, vaping products ban MORE (Ill.), the No. 2 Democrat in the chamber, are wary or outright opposed to nixing the filibuster, arguing it would turn the Senate into the House, defang the minority and freeze any hope of bipartisanship. 
 
 
Twenty-eight Democrats currently in the Senate signed a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Energy: Pelosi vows bold action to counter 'existential' climate threat | Trump jokes new light bulbs don't make him look as good | 'Forever chemicals' measure pulled from defense bill Overnight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson – House progressives may try to block vote on Pelosi drug bill | McConnell, Grassley at odds over Trump-backed drug pricing bill | Lawmakers close to deal on surprise medical bills GOP senators request interview with former DNC contractor to probe possible Ukraine ties MORE (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOvernight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson — Democrats call on Supreme Court to block Louisiana abortion law | Michigan governor seeks to pause Medicaid work requirements | New front in fight over Medicaid block grants House, Senate Democrats call on Supreme Court to block Louisiana abortion law Why a second Trump term and a Democratic Congress could be a nightmare scenario for the GOP MORE (D-N.Y.) in 2017, after Republicans got rid of the 60-vote filibuster for Supreme Court nominees, supporting keeping the legislative filibuster.