Sanders: 'Not crazy' about nixing the Senate filibuster

 
"I'm not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster," Sanders said during an interview with CBS News's "This Morning." 
 
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Sanders, appearing to pivot away from the topic of the filibuster, added that the "problem" with Washington, D.C., is that there is a system dominated "by wealthy campaign contributors." 
 
"I'm not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster. I think the problem is, people often talk about the lack of comity and the anger. The real issue is that you have in Washington a system which is dominated in Washington by wealthy campaign contributors," he said. 
 
Talk of getting rid of the legislative filibuster if Democrats retake the Senate in 2020 kicked into high gear late last month after Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenMSNBC's Chris Matthews confuses South Carolina Democratic Senate candidate with GOP's Tim Scott Trump surveys South Carolina supporters on preferred Democratic opponent Watch live: Trump holds a rally in South Carolina MORE (D-Mass.) told Politico that nixing the 60-vote legislative filibuster should be “on the table” if Democrats win back the chamber and the White House in the 2020 elections.  
 
A coalition of progressive groups are trying to make the the legislative filibuster a wedge issue in the primary, where several Democratic senators are running for their party's nomination. 
 
They argue that the myriad of big-idea proposals currently being pitched by progressives — including "Medicare for all" and the Green New Deal — would be dead on arrival in the Senate if 60 votes are required. 
 
But several Democratic senators, including Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats introduce bill to reverse Trump's shift of military money toward wall Overnight Energy: EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in drinking water | Trump budget calls for slashing funds for climate science centers | House Dems urge banks not to fund drilling in Arctic refuge Democratic senators criticize plan that could expand Arctic oil and gas development MORE (Ill.), the No. 2 Democrat in the chamber, are wary or outright opposed to nixing the filibuster, arguing it would turn the Senate into the House, defang the minority and freeze any hope of bipartisanship. 
 
 
Twenty-eight Democrats currently in the Senate signed a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Facebook — Washington, Wall Street on edge about coronavirus Overnight Energy: Murkowski, Manchin unveil major energy bill | Lawmakers grill EPA chief over push to slash agency's budget | GOP lawmaker accuses Trump officials of 'playing politics' over Yucca Mountain Lawmakers race to pass emergency coronavirus funding MORE (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerBiden win in South Carolina could turn tide, say strategists Sanders blasts Trump for picking 'completely unqualified' Pence for coronavirus response Trump passes Pence a dangerous buck MORE (D-N.Y.) in 2017, after Republicans got rid of the 60-vote filibuster for Supreme Court nominees, supporting keeping the legislative filibuster.