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Warner says there are 'enormous amounts of evidence' suggesting Russia collusion

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerWhite House briefed on bipartisan infrastructure deal but says questions remain Bipartisan Senate group announces infrastructure deal 'The era of bipartisanship is over': Senate hits rough patch MORE (D-Va.) said Sunday that there are "enormous amounts of evidence" suggesting collusion between President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump DOJ demanded metadata on 73 phone numbers and 36 email addresses, Apple says Putin says he's optimistic about working with Biden ahead of planned meeting Biden meets Queen Elizabeth for first time as president MORE's 2016 campaign and Russia.

"Where that evidence leads, in terms of a conclusion — and we still have some of those key people to come back — I'm going to reserve judgment until I'm finished," Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"There's no one that could factually say there's not plenty of evidence of collaboration or communications between Trump Organization and Russians."

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Warner's comments came in response to a quote from Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze Burr House Democrats to Schumer: Vote again on Jan. 6 probe Lara Trump lost her best opportunity — if she ever really wanted it Trump touts record, blasts Dems in return to stage MORE (R-N.C.) in which he said there was "no factual evidence" of collusion.

Host Chuck Todd pressed Warner on whether there was an actual crime in play that could precipitate the impeachment of Trump.

"I have never in my lifetime seen a presidential campaign, from a person of either party, have this much outreach to a foreign country and a foreign country that the intelligence community, and our committee has validated, intervened, massively, in our election and intervened with an attempt to help one candidate, Donald Trump, and to hurt another candidate, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump asks Biden to give Putin his 'warmest regards' Huma Abedin announces book deal Mystery surrounds Justice's pledge on journalist records MORE," he said.

Warner continued that he would reserve his judgement until criminal investigations from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE conclude so that the Intelligence Committee can meet with key figures.

"Those criminal investigations need to conclude, before we get a chance to talk to them," he said.

Trump has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing related to collusion, calling investigations into him a "witch hunt."