SPONSORED:

Warner says there are 'enormous amounts of evidence' suggesting Russia collusion

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerLeadership changes at top cyber agency raise national security concerns IRS races to get remaining stimulus checks to low-income households Hillicon Valley: Trump fires top federal cybersecurity official, GOP senators push back | Apple to pay 3 million to resolve fight over batteries | Los Angeles Police ban use of third-party facial recognition software MORE (D-Va.) said Sunday that there are "enormous amounts of evidence" suggesting collusion between President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden to nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield for UN ambassador: reports Scranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Kasich: Republicans 'either in complete lockstep' or 'afraid' of Trump MORE's 2016 campaign and Russia.

"Where that evidence leads, in terms of a conclusion — and we still have some of those key people to come back — I'm going to reserve judgment until I'm finished," Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"There's no one that could factually say there's not plenty of evidence of collaboration or communications between Trump Organization and Russians."

ADVERTISEMENT

Warner's comments came in response to a quote from Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrNorth Carolina's Mark Walker expected to announce Senate bid Lara Trump mulling 2022 Senate run in North Carolina: report Cyber agency urges employees not to lose focus in wake of director's firing MORE (R-N.C.) in which he said there was "no factual evidence" of collusion.

Host Chuck Todd pressed Warner on whether there was an actual crime in play that could precipitate the impeachment of Trump.

"I have never in my lifetime seen a presidential campaign, from a person of either party, have this much outreach to a foreign country and a foreign country that the intelligence community, and our committee has validated, intervened, massively, in our election and intervened with an attempt to help one candidate, Donald Trump, and to hurt another candidate, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden to name longtime aide Blinken as secretary of State: report Understanding mixed results in Pennsylvania key to future elections What's behind the divisions over Biden's secretary of Labor? MORE," he said.

Warner continued that he would reserve his judgement until criminal investigations from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE conclude so that the Intelligence Committee can meet with key figures.

"Those criminal investigations need to conclude, before we get a chance to talk to them," he said.

Trump has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing related to collusion, calling investigations into him a "witch hunt."