Warner says there are 'enormous amounts of evidence' suggesting Russia collusion

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerBipartisan senators urge national security adviser to appoint 5G coordinator Hillicon Valley: Commerce extends Huawei waiver | Senate Dems unveil privacy bill priorities | House funding measure extends surveillance program | Trump to tour Apple factory | GOP bill would restrict US data going to China Klobuchar unveils plan to secure elections as president MORE (D-Va.) said Sunday that there are "enormous amounts of evidence" suggesting collusion between President TrumpDonald John TrumpDem senator says Zelensky was 'feeling the pressure' to probe Bidens 2020 Dems slam Trump decision on West Bank settlements Trump calls latest impeachment hearings 'a great day for Republicans' MORE's 2016 campaign and Russia.

"Where that evidence leads, in terms of a conclusion — and we still have some of those key people to come back — I'm going to reserve judgment until I'm finished," Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"There's no one that could factually say there's not plenty of evidence of collaboration or communications between Trump Organization and Russians."

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Warner's comments came in response to a quote from Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrMcConnell hopes Senate impeachment trial 'not too lengthy a process' Bipartisan senators urge national security adviser to appoint 5G coordinator GOP divided over impeachment trial strategy MORE (R-N.C.) in which he said there was "no factual evidence" of collusion.

Host Chuck Todd pressed Warner on whether there was an actual crime in play that could precipitate the impeachment of Trump.

"I have never in my lifetime seen a presidential campaign, from a person of either party, have this much outreach to a foreign country and a foreign country that the intelligence community, and our committee has validated, intervened, massively, in our election and intervened with an attempt to help one candidate, Donald Trump, and to hurt another candidate, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocrats ask judge for quick ruling on McGahn subpoena Hillary Clinton: 'Every day Stephen Miller remains in the White House is an emergency' The Memo: Centrists change tone of Democratic race MORE," he said.

Warner continued that he would reserve his judgement until criminal investigations from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSpeier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump Gowdy: I '100 percent' still believe public congressional hearings are 'a circus' Comey: Mueller 'didn't succeed in his mission because there was inadequate transparency' MORE conclude so that the Intelligence Committee can meet with key figures.

"Those criminal investigations need to conclude, before we get a chance to talk to them," he said.

Trump has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing related to collusion, calling investigations into him a "witch hunt."